Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
David: What Should You Order in this British Restaurant? David Here.
Kellie: Hello. I'm Kellie.
David: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to order a meal in a restaurant. The conversation takes place at a restaurant.
Kellie: The speakers are strangers.
David: So they will speak formal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Waiter: Are you ready to order?
Katrina: I would like to ask a couple of questions first. It says in the menu that the quiche is vegan, is that correct? Are there any eggs in it?
Waiter: No madam, there are no eggs. It is fully vegan.
Katrina: That's good! How spicy is your Thai curry?
Waiter: It has a three spice rating which means that it is very spicy.
Katrina: Hmm, that might be too spicy for me. I will have the quiche. Can you bring the bill afterwards, please?
Waiter: Of course.
David: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Waiter: Are you ready to order?
Katrina: I would like to ask a couple of questions first. It says in the menu that the quiche is vegan, is that correct? Are there any eggs in it?
Waiter: No madam, there are no eggs. It is fully vegan.
Katrina: That's good! How spicy is your Thai curry?
Waiter: It has a three spice rating which means that it is very spicy.
Katrina: Hmm, that might be too spicy for me. I will have the quiche. Can you bring the bill afterwards, please?
Waiter: Of course.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
David: It sounds like Katrina is vegan!
Kellie: It does! Food allergies and special diets are becoming more and more common in the UK, so she would be one of many that live a vegan lifestyle.
David: Is it easy to be vegan or avoid allergies?
Kellie: I think so, yes. The UK has a wide variety of foods, so shopping or eating for allergies or intolerances isn’t too difficult.
David: Is it okay in restaurants?
Kellie: Most restaurants have detailed information on their food that will list ingredients and highlight allergy information, so you just need to ask, like Katrina did.
David: There are lots of specialist food stores too.
Kellie: Yeah, there are many health food stores that have sections for, for example, gluten-free food.
David: You can get organic fruit and vegetables in supermarkets too.
Kellie: You can, but that’s typically more expensive than regular fruit or vegetables.
David: It’s better for you though!
Kellie: I agree!
David: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
David: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
David: Next we have..
Kellie: correct [natural native speed]
David: true, free of errors
Kellie: correct[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: correct [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: quiche [natural native speed]
David: a pie-like dish, made from a pastry shell with a filling of savoury custard and other ingredients such as cheese, ham, or seafood
Kellie: quiche[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: quiche [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: fully [natural native speed]
David: totally, completely
Kellie: fully[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: fully [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: spicy [natural native speed]
David: seasoned with spice, hot to eat
Kellie: spicy[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: spicy [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: rating [natural native speed]
David: a classification system based on quality or rank
Kellie: rating[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: rating [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: curry [natural native speed]
David: an Indian dish made with spices and usually served with either rice or naan bread
Kellie: curry[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: curry [natural native speed]
David: And last..
Kellie: afterwards [natural native spee d]
David: at a later time
Kellie: afterwards[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: afterwards [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
David: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Kellie: vegan
David: meaning "a person who eats nothing that comes from an animal"
David: Vegans are different from vegetarians, right?
Kellie: Yes, they are. Vegans not only don’t eat any animal products, including things such as eggs, but they also won’t use any other animal products.
David: Oh, you mean things like leather?
Kellie: Yes, leather, wool.. Vegans won’t touch that. If you have to cook or buy a present for someone who is vegan, be careful!
David: Check all of the ingredients or materials.
Kellie: Definitely!
David: Can you give us an example using this word?
Kellie: Sure. For example, you can say.. My sister has been a vegan since she was 18.
David: ..which means "My sister hasn’t eaten or used animal products since she was 18". Okay, what's the next word?
Kellie: curry
David: meaning "a spicy dish that originated in South and Southeast Asia"
David: We briefly spoke about curry before and said it was really popular in the UK.
Kellie: Curry houses, that is, curry restaurants, are everywhere in the UK.
David: Is it the same as the curry you’d find in India, or Pakistan, for example?
Kellie: No, it’s evolved a bit to suit Brits a bit more.
David: How is it different?
Kellie: It’s still hot and made from different spices, but some of the flavours are different and so is the way it’s served.
David: Can you give us an example using this word?
Kellie: Sure. For example, you can say.. Let's go for a curry after work.
David: .. which means "Let’s eat a hot and spicy meal after work" Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

David: In this lesson, you'll learn how to order a meal in a restaurant. But first let’s review how to use the relative pronoun “which”. In the dialogue, the waiter said “It has a three-spice rating which means that it is very spicy.”
Kellie: That is an example of “which” being used as a relative pronoun.
David: So let’s concentrate on the use of “which” only.
Kellie: Alright. Some relative pronouns, like “who”, for example, are used when talking about people. “Which” is only used for things.
David: Such as the three-spice rating in the dialogue.
Kellie: The waiter could have used two separate sentences. He could have said “It has a three spice rating” as sentence one.
David: And then “It means it is very spicy” as sentence two.
Kellie: But using short sentences like that when they can be connected sounds a little strange. Native English speakers wouldn’t do that.
David: They would connect the sentences.
Kellie: Yes. Native and fluent English is full of long sentences. For example, “I caught the train, which was late, at King’s Cross Station”.
David: You used “which” to add in the information that the train was late.
Kellie: Yes. The sentence flowed and sounded natural.
David: Okay. In the last lesson, we looked at the word “may”. Now, let’s look at a word that is kinda similar - “might”.
Kellie: “Might” isn’t as polite as “may”. It isn’t rude in any way, it just isn’t as polite. We can use the word “may” for permission, but we can’t use “might” for permission.
David: Okay. So those are the differences. How about the similarities?
Kellie: We can use “might” for possibility. “He might pass the test if he studies hard.”
David: “They mightn’t eat meat, I’m not sure.”
Kellie: Note that negative “might not” was contracted into “mightn’t” there. It can also be used for suggestion.
David: We can suggest and recommend things.
Kellie: “You might want to wash your hands before eating.”
David: “You might want to read the lesson notes for this lesson.”
Kellie: Oooh, good one! So, if you find yourself in a restaurant, there are many set phrases you can use to order some food.
David: These all follow a similar pattern and you can switch the name of the food for any other food.
Kellie: To begin with, you can tell the waiter “I’m ready to order”, to say that you have decided.
David: Then the waiter will be ready to take your order!
Kellie: I fancy some steak, so I could say “I will have the steak” or “Could I have the steak, please?”
David: If you want steak but aren’t sure if they have it, you can ask “Do you have steak?”
Kellie: And if they do, you can order! I’m hungry now, so let’s go and eat steak.
David: Good idea!

Outro

David: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Kellie: Bye.

3 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 06:30 PM
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If you were allergic to a kind of food, how would you let others know in English?

Gonna
Saturday at 11:02 PM
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Oh pleased to hear the example of dialogue,its attractive and be inspiring. thank you👍😇

Rosario Rosato
Wednesday at 01:25 PM
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What's the difference between "there are no eggs" and "there aren't eggs"?