Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

Intro

Barbara: Good morning!
Braden: Braden here. Receiving an English Invite to an Exclusive Dinner. In this lesson, you’ll learn about Noun + Prepositions and Formal dinners.
Barbara: This conversation takes place in the morning, at a meeting.
Braden: And it’s between the Chairman and Jennifer.
Barbara: They are at an official meeting, so they are speaking professionally.
Braden: Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Chairman: Okay so, everyone is agreed that Jeffrey Nye will take Daniel Giesbrect's place as our new keynote speaker?
(general confirmation)
Chairman: Excellent. Is there any other business?
Jennifer: Sir, I'd just like to remind every one of the banquet that we're going to have on Thursday night.
Chairman: Yes that's right. Please, take the floor.
Jennifer: Each year the International Relations Department puts on a banquet in connection with the seminar. The entire committee is invited, and you may bring with you, one guest. This dinner is closed to the public.
Chairman: That's right. For those of you who have not been with us in past years, I would like to stress that this is a formal banquet for committee members, International relations Department members, and delegates and this year we're expecting around eighty attendees.
Jennifer: We have reserved the Brazilian steakhouse Fogo de Chão starting at 7.
Chairman: Let's bring this meeting to a close for today. Our next meeting will take place in two weeks on February 18.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: So, we wanted to talk a little bit about formal dinners.
Barbara: Formal dinners or formal banquets are very common in academic settings. Seminars, conventions, galas, and symposiums frequently have some kind of closed session, a formal banquet for the experts or delegates invited.
Braden: The dress code for these formal dinners can vary dramatically. For the most part, however, a “black-tie” dress code is the most common. “Black-tie” events require the men to wear black tuxedos with black bow ties.
Barbara: This is the standard dress for weddings in the United States.
Braden: There also exists a “white tie” dress code. In the United States, the white tie dress code has been largely replaced by black tie dress.
Barbara: The only time I have ever seen a man in white tie dress was the conductor of a large metropolitan symphony playing classical music. The musicians wore black-tie attire.
Vocabulary and Phrases
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Barbara: shall we [natural native speed]
Braden: when used with “let’s” a suggestion to do something
Barbara: shall we [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: shall we [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: keynote [natural native speed]
Braden: introductory speech given at the beginning of a conference
Barbara: keynote [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: keynote [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: night [natural native speed]
Braden: period of darkness after sunset
Barbara: night [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: night [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: delegate [natural native speed]
Braden: a person who represents others in a conference
Barbara: delegate [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: delegate [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: department [natural native speed]
Braden: a division of a large organization
Barbara: department [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: department [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: member [natural native speed]
Braden: an individual, thing or organization belonging to a group
Barbara: member [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: member [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Barbara: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase Let's bring this to a close for today.
Braden: This phrase is used to close some kind of event. The prepositional phrase “for today” used at the end indicated that they are dealing with something that will happen again on some other day.
Barbara: You can use this phrase to either close a particular topic of discussion for the day or to close the entire meeting for today.
Braden: This is often used by meeting leaders when the discussion within the meeting has become unproductive, or a next step cannot be defined.
Barbara: This is a polite phrase compared to “The meeting is over.” or, “Stop talking about that.” It’s also a phrase using the word, “let’s” to show unity among the group.
Braden: Sometimes, it isn't used to remind the group that they should be working together and not against each other.
Braden: Could you break this down for us?
Barbara: Let's bring this to a close for today (slowly)
Braden: And one time fast?
Barbara: Let's bring this to a close for today (fast)
Braden: Our next phrase is, Is there any other business?
Braden: The chairman asked this to make sure that each relevant topic had been discussed during the meeting.
Barbara: Here the word “business” refers to “topics to be discussed” and not some other company.
Braden: Could you break this down?
Barbara: Is there any other business? (slowly)
Braden: And one time fast?
Barbara: Is there any other business? (fast)
Braden: Let’s take a look at the grammar point.

Lesson focus

Barbara: The focus of this lesson is nouns and prepositions
Braden: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase
Barbara: Each year the International Relations Department puts on a banquet in connection with the seminar.
Braden: In this lesson, we’re going to specify a preposition. Then we’re going to give you a short list of nouns and a sample sentence using that noun/preposition combination.
Barbara: Let’s start with BETWEEN. Use 'between' preceded by the following nouns.
Braden: First “connection” An example sentence would be “There is no connection between the two crimes.”
Barbara: Second “relationship” The sample sentence would be “The relationship between the two friends was very strong.”
Braden: Now let’s take a look at the preposition “FOR.”
Barbara: Use 'for' preceded by the following nouns.
Braden: First, a “check” – for (an amount of money) Sample sentence, “She gave me a check for $50.”
Barbara: Third, need. Sample sentence, “There is a real need for discipline in this class.”
Braden: Next, let’s have a look at “IN.” Use 'in' preceded by the following nouns. First, “rise” Sample sentence, “There has been a rise in prices recently.”
Barbara: Second, “increase” Sample sentence, “We have seen many increases in production levels.”
Braden: Next, we’ll look at “OF.” Use 'of' preceded by the following nouns.
Barbara: First, “cause” Sample sentence, “She is the cause of all his problems.”
Braden: Second, “photograph” or “picture” “He took a photograph of the mountains.”
Barbara: Next we’ll look at “TO” - Use 'to' preceded by the following nouns.
Braden: First, we’ll look at “damage” Sample sentence, “I did a lot of damage to my car the other day.”
Barbara: Second, “reaction” “Her reaction to his behavior was quite comical.”
Braden: Lastly, we’ll look at “WITH.” Use 'with' preceded by the following nouns.
Barbara: First, “relationship “ “My relationship with Mary is wonderful."
Braden: Second, “contact” “Have you had any contact with Sarah?”

Outro

Braden: That just about does it for today.
Braden: Thanks for listening!
Barbara: See you later!

7 Comments

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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:30 PM
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Hello again all you fabulous EnglishClass101.com listeners! Have you ever participated in a formal dinner in English?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 01:24 PM
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Hello there John, Amber and Lorna,


Thank you for taking the time to write to us.


Thanks for the question Amber - and yes, John you are correct. To "take the floor" is to become the centre of attention - it could be in reference to a stage or in a speech or conversation.


If you ever have any other questions, feel free to ask!


Cheers,

Eva

Team EnglishClass101.com

John Xiang
Saturday at 08:44 PM
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Hi Amber ,

I think "take the floor" means that go to the stage and say something about the banquet. In this conversation , Jennifer reminds everyone of the banquet, so the chairman says this words to her.

wish it could help you.

thanks

Lorna
Monday at 05:39 PM
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Good Job, as always.

Amber
Tuesday at 08:38 PM
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What does it mean " take the floor"?

Englishclass101.com Verified
Saturday at 01:35 AM
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Hello AungZW


Great to see you here!


Should you have any questions, please let us know.


Sincerely


Cristiane

Team Englishclass101.com

AungZW
Friday at 04:26 PM
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