Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

Intro

Barbara: Good afternoon!
Braden: Braden here.You Have to Remember Your Plane Ticket in the US! In this lesson, you’ll learn about Modal verbs–must/have to and Income taxes.
Barbara: This conversation takes place in the afternoon, at the travel agency.
Braden: And it’s between the receptionist and Mr. Jeffery Nye.
Barbara: Mr. Nye is a customer of the travel agency and has purchased his tickets to the seminar through the agency. Now he seems to be missing something.
Braden: Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Receptionist: What can I help you with, Mr. Nye?
Jeffery Nye: I believe I forgot my plane tickets here the other day.
Receptionist: Wait just one moment please, I'll check...
(computer noises, paper rustling, a chair moving)
Receptionist: Mr. Jeffery Nye?
Jeffery Nye: That's correct.
Receptionist: Our records show that you don't have any printed tickets yet. I didn't print your tickets because we can't do that here.
Jeffery Nye: I'm afraid I don't understand.
Receptionist: Most of our plane tickets are handled online; we just email you the confirmation code.
Jeffery Nye: That's right. I've done that before.
Receptionist: However, you informed me that you must have paper tickets for tax purposes.
Jeffery Nye: (remembering) That's right. I'm in a unique tax situation, and I mustn't forget.
Receptionist: In order to accommodate you, sir, we sent you an email with a special case number. You'll have to call customer service with that case number and ask them to mail you printed tickets.
Jeffrey Nye: But I don't remember getting any email. Could you send me another one?
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: So, we wanted to talk a little bit about Income taxes
Barbara: Since everyone's different, so is every situation. This also applies to income taxes. In the dialogue, it was mentioned that Mr. Jeffrey Nye had a unique tax situation that required him to have paper-based plane tickets.
Braden: This is extremely rare as the IRS or Internal Revenue Service accepts electronic documentation in most situations.
Barbara: Income tax is a government tax levied on the income of individuals and businesses. Every country has a different income tax system, and even within the United States, there are variations from state to state.
Braden: In general, individuals are taxed on their gross (or total) income while businesses are taxed on their net income (the difference between gross revenue minus expenses).
Braden: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
Vocabulary and Phrases
Braden: The first word we’ll look at is:
Barbara: ticket [natural native speed]
Braden: a piece of paper that serves as a permit
Barbara: ticket [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: ticket [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: plane [natural native speed]
Braden: an airplane
Barbara: plane [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: plane [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: forgot [natural native speed]
Braden: fail to remember
Barbara: forgot [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: forgot [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: forgotten [natural native speed]
Braden: past participle of “forget.”
Barbara: forgotten [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: forgotten [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: believe [natural native speed]
Braden: hold some idea; think or suppose
Barbara: believe [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: believe [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: moment [natural native speed]
Braden: a short period of time
Barbara: moment [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: moment [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: understand [natural native speed]
Braden: to grasp the meaning of; comprehend
Barbara: understand [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: understand [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: confirmation [natural native speed]
Braden: proof of something, validation
Barbara: confirmation [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: confirmation [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: print [natural native speed]
Braden: process of transferring images, text, and designs to paper
Barbara: print [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: print [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: explain [natural native speed]
Braden: to make something understandable
Barbara: explain [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: explain [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: handle [natural native speed]
Braden: to feel, manipulate, drive or control with the hands or influence
Barbara: handle [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: handle [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: online [natural native speed]
Braden: on the Internet
Barbara: online [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: online [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: informed [natural native speed]
Braden: having knowledge of a particular subject
Barbara: informed [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: informed [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: must [natural native speed]
Braden: be obliged to; should
Barbara: must [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: must [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: tax [natural native speed]
Braden: compulsory contribution to state revenue
Barbara: tax [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: tax [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: purpose [natural native speed]
Braden: reason
Barbara: purpose [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: purpose [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: SPAM [natural native speed]
Braden: unsolicited messages sent via the Internet to many recipients at a time
Barbara: SPAM [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: SPAM [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: link [natural native speed]
Braden: a relationship between two things or situations
Barbara: link [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: link [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Barbara: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase for tax purposes
Braden: When someone says “tax purposes” or tax reasons” they are referring to their personal or business income taxes.
Barbara: In the United States, taxes are the main source of money for the government to pay for its programs and services.
Braden: Depending on your income, you could lose a lot of money to taxes in any given year. For that reason, and many others, American’s are always trying to pay less taxes.
Barbara: In order to pay less taxes, an individual must prove to the government that certain expenses or income do not qualify for taxation. To do this, they must have evidence in the form of receipts, or in this case, plane tickets.
Braden: Could you break this down?
Barbara: for tax purposes (slowly)
Braden: And one time fast?
Barbara: for tax purposes (fast)
Braden: Our next phrase is I’m afraid I don’t understand.
Braden: Just to be clear, this phrase doesn’t actually mean that you’re afraid. “I’m afraid that” is an expression, so it shouldn’t be taken literally.
Barbara:
Braden: Could you break this down?
Barbara: I’m afraid I don’t understand (slowly)
Braden: And one time fast?
Barbara: I’m afraid I don’t understand (fast)
Braden: Let’s take a look at the grammar point.

Lesson focus

Barbara: The focus of this lesson is the modal verbs must and have to
Braden: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase
Barbara: However, you informed me that you must have paper tickets for tax purposes.
Braden: "Must" and "Have to" in the positive or question form are used to speak about responsibilities and obligations.
Barbara: Sometimes, "must" and "have to" can be exchanged, but the general rule is that must is used for strong personal obligations (I must do this right now!) and have to is used for responsibilities (I have to file reports every week.)
Braden: "Don't have to" and "Mustn't" have very different meanings. "Don't have to" is used to express that something is not required. "Mustn't" is used to express that something is prohibited.
Barbara: In general, "must" is used in everyday situations in which something important occurs and requires immediate action.
Braden: "Have to" is often used to discuss our daily responsibilities and is commonly used to describe workplace situations. Many times, "have to" is used in place of "must" in informal English.
Barbara: First let’s take a look at Have to do and Responsibilities. Use "have to" in the past, present, and future to express responsibility or necessity.
Braden: Be aware that "have to" is conjugated as a regular verb and therefore requires an auxiliary verb in the question form or negative.
Barbara: For example, “ You’ll have to call customer service with that case number.” and “She had to work hard yesterday.”
Braden: Now let’s look at Must do - Obligations. Use "must" to express something that you or a person feels is necessary. This form is used only in the present and future.
Barbara: For example, “You informed me that you must have paper tickets for tax purposes.” and “Must you work so hard?”
Braden: Now let’s look at, “Don't have to do - Not Required. The negative form of "have to" expresses the idea that something is not required. It is, however, possible if so desired.
Barbara: For example, “You don't have to arrive before 8.” and “They didn't have to work so hard.”
Braden: Now let’s look at Mustn't do - Prohibition. The negative form of "must" expresses the idea that something is prohibited - this form is very different in meaning than the negative of "have to"!
Barbara: For example, “Dustin, you mustn't play with fire.” and “ She mustn't use such horrible language.”
Braden: Also be aware that – The past form of "have to" and "must" is "had to." "Must" does not exist in the past.
Barbara: For example, “Did he have to leave so early?” and “She had to pick the children up from school.”
Barbara: Let’s review this lesson.

Outro

Braden: That just about does it for today.
Braden: Thanks for listening!
Barbara: See you later!

9 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:30 PM
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Hello all! Do you think business should be taxes on their gross income just like individuals?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 11:04 AM
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Hello G,


Thanks for taking the time to write and share this with us.


We will review it and take relevant action.


I hope you're enjoying your studies with us.


Regards,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

G
Wednesday at 10:02 AM
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believe - incorrect audio file

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 11:52 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Juana,


Excellent news! We're pleased to be helping you along your journey to speaking fluent English.


We are constantly updating the lessons on our site so please stay tuned! 👍


Feel free to ask us any questions that come up.


Take it easy,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Juana Díaz
Wednesday at 08:41 AM
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This was a very practical and useful lesson. Thanks for including it within the program.

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 12:55 PM
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Hi again Lorna 😄


Thanks for writing and giving your opinion. Good to know this topic interests you! ❤️️👍


We have so many lessons and a lot of support for you here during your studies and are constantly updating the lessons on our site so please stay tuned! 👍


Feel free to ask us any questions that come up.


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Lorna
Monday at 08:25 PM
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Hello everyone:

That's an interesting question, and I'd like to give my humble opinion.

As an individual taxpayer, my answer at first glance would be 'Yes, I do". However, little do I know about businesses and on how many expenses they incur to carry out their operations: such as additional taxes and obligations with different tax authorities (local, state and federal tax agency) throughout the year, unlike personal taxpayer; probably my answer would be "No, I do not".

I would like to learn more about this kind of topics in the future.

Englishclass101.com Verified
Sunday at 05:10 PM
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Hi AungZW


Thank you for posting.


Looking forward to seeing you often here.


Sincerely


Cristiane

Team Englishclass101.com

AungZW
Sunday at 02:55 PM
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