Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

Intro

Barbara: Good morning!
Braden: Braden here. Get the Best Panelists for your American Seminar. In this lesson, you’ll learn about The five types of adverbs and about Panel discussions.
Barbara: The conversation takes place in the late morning, on the phone.
Braden: And it’s between Jennifer and Daniel Giesbrect.
Barbara: Jennifer and Daniel have never met, and Jennifer is inviting Daniel to officially participate in the seminar, so the language will be formal.
Braden: Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Jennifer: Thank you for taking the time to speak with me today.
Daniel Giesbrect: It's my pleasure. What can I do for you?
Jennifer: As part of our seminar, we're going to have a number of workshops, panel discussions, and speeches. In order to advertise properly, I need to ask you some questions so that people participating in the seminar will have an idea of your background.
Daniel Giesbrect: Makes sense.
Jennifer: May I begin?
Daniel Giesbrect: Go for it.
Jennifer: Who do you work for?
Daniel Giesbrect: I am a full-time employee for ExxonMobil. However, I also have a significant number of independent consulting contracts.
Jennifer: What are your main responsibilities at ExxonMobil?
Daniel Giesbrect: Currently, I'm the head of the multi-chemical division. We are usually in charge of the crude oil processing, although, sometimes that can be outsourced.
Jennifer: And where are you based?
Daniel Giesbrect: The ExxonMobil headquarters is located in Texas which, fortunately, is where my office is.
Jennifer: Are your independent contracts related to your position at ExxonMobil?
Daniel Giesbrect: No and yes. I'm usually contracted because my position is high-profile. However, the contracts I receive are not "because I work at Exxon."
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: So, we wanted to talk a little bit about Panel discussions.
Barbara: A panel discussion is a type of convention panel, which is a forum for discussion of a particular topic at conventions, seminars, and symposiums.
Braden: Usually, the discussions and presentations are related to the topic of the convention itself.
Barbara: Since the theme of this seminar is "Energy and our Future,” the topics for these panel discussions will probably be about things such as nuclear energy, wind energy, petroleum, and other forms of energy production.
Braden: They could also deal with reduction in energy costs, alteration of energy taxes and subsidies, or energy distribution models.
Barbara: Usually, each member of the panel of delegates gives us a short presentation and after all of them are finished with their presentations, the panel is opened up for discussion and or Q&A, which means question and answer.
Braden: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
Vocabulary and Phrases
Braden: The first word we’ll look at is:
Barbara: outsourced [natural native speed]
Braden: using companies and organizations outside of your own to complete tasks, obtain goods or services from outside or foreign supplier
Barbara: outsourced [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: outsourced [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: series [natural native speed]
Braden: a number of things of a similar kind grouped in successive order
Barbara: series [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: series [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: crude [natural native speed]
Braden: in a natural or raw state; not yet processed or refined
Barbara: crude [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: crude [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: oil [natural native speed]
Braden: a liquid derived from petroleum used as lubricant or fuel
Barbara: oil [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: oil [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: processing [natural native speed]
Braden: perform a series of operations
Barbara: processing [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: processing [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: headquarters [natural native speed]
Braden: the place that serves as a managerial and administrative center of an organization
Barbara: headquarters [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: headquarters [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Barbara: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase "taking the time."
Braden: This phrase is an English idiom. Often it refers to the larger phrase “taking the time out of your busy schedule.” or “taking the time out of your day.”
Barbara: “Taking the time” is a shortened version of that.
Braden: What we wanted to point out here is how this phrase fits into the sentence. Specifically, wether to use “you” or “your” directly before it.”
Barbara: Many people say “you” because you conjugate the verb “taking.” “Taking the time” is an action that the person performs.
Braden: However, some hold that, particularly in formal writing, “taking the time” as an idiom has become a noun phrase and therefore should be possessed by the individual, which would require the pronoun “your.”
Barbara: For me, they both sound right when putting in the correct contexts. If I were talking to an individual person, I’d say, “you taking the time.” But if I were talking to a board of directors at my company, I might say “you're taking the time.”
Braden: Could you break this down?
Barbara: taking the time (slowly)
Braden: And one time fast?
Barbara: taking the time (fast)
Braden: Our next phrase is "It’s my pleasure." This is a very polite phrase used to show that you are happy about talking to the other person.
Barbara: This is often used in response to the phrase “taking the time.” These two phrases aren’t paired, exactly, but that happens together frequently.
Braden: That’s right. Could you break this down?
Barbara: It’s my pleasure. (slowly)
Braden: And one time fast?
Barbara: It’s my pleasure. (fast)
Braden: Our next phrase is "crude oil." This phrase refers to petroleum before it’s processed.
Barbara: The adjective “crude” can sometimes mean “low” or “degrading.” as in “That’s crude language.” to refer to language containing swear words.
Braden: However, in this situation, “crude” is a synonym for “raw” or “unprocessed.”
Braden: Could you break this down?
Barbara: crude (slowly)
Braden: And one time fast?
Barbara: crude (fast)
Braden: Perfect. Let’s take a look at the grammar point.

Lesson focus

Braden: What’s the focus of this lesson?
Barbara: The focus of this lesson is the five types of adverbs
Braden: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase
Barbara: We are usually in charge of the crude oil processing, although, sometimes that can be outsourced.
Braden: First we’ll look at Adverbs of manner. By the way, “manner” is spelled with an “er”, not an “ar.” In case you are having trouble with that.
Barbara: So, Adverbs of manner provide information on how someone does something.
Braden: For example, “Dustin drives very carefully.”
Barbara: Adverbs of manner are placed after the verb or at the end of the sentence.
Braden: For example, “Their teacher speaks quickly.”
Barbara: Now, let’s look at Adverbs of Time. Adverbs of time provide information on when something happens.
Braden: For example, “We'll let you know our decision next week.”
Barbara: Adverbs of time are placed after the verb or at the end of the sentence.
Braden: For example, “She visited her friends last year.”
Barbara: Next we have Adverbs of Frequency. Adverbs of frequency provide information on how often something happens.
Braden: Adverbs of frequency are placed before the main verb, not the auxiliary verb. For example, “He often goes to bed late.” or “Do you sometimes get up early?”
Barbara: Next we have Adverbs of Degree. Adverbs of degree provide information concerning how much of something is done.
Braden: Adverbs of degree are placed after the verb or entire expression (at the end of the sentence). For example, “She'll attend the meeting as well.”
Barbara: Next we have Adverbs of Comment. Adverbs of comment provide a comment or opinion about a situation.
Braden: Adverbs of comment are placed at the beginning of a sentence. For example, “Luckily, I was able to come to the presentation.”
Barbara: Now let’s look at an exception to standard Adverb Placement. Adverbs of frequency are placed after the verb 'to be' when used as the main verb of the sentence.
Barbara: For example, “Dustin is often late for work.”
Braden: To wrap things up, let’s review Adverb Formation. Adverbs are usually formed by adding '-ly' to an adjective.
Barbara: For example, “quiet” becomes “quietly” and “careful” becomes “carefully.”
Braden: Also, adjectives ending in '-le' change to '-ly.' For example, “possible” becomes “possibly” and “probable” becomes “probably.”
Barbara: Adjectives ending in '-y' change to '-ily.' For example, “lucky” becomes “luckily” and “happy” becomes “happily.”
Braden: Adjectives ending in '-ic' change to '-ically.' For example, “basic” becomes “basically,” and “ironic” becomes “ironically.”

Outro

Braden: That just does it for today.
Barbara: Thanks for being with us.
Braden: Thanks for listening.
Barbara: Bye!

44 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:30 PM
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Hello EnglishClass101.com listeners! How many telephone interviews have you done?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 03:10 PM
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Hello Pramod,


Thanks for the feedback! We really appreciate you taking the time to send it to us!


Please let us know how we can help you on your English language journey.


Cheers,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Pramod
Thursday at 10:10 PM
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hi ,

Adverbs are great - Feel more confident during business meetings .


I'd like to see more quiz questions in this lesson .

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 06:51 PM
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Hello Edson,


Thank you for posting! We hope you're enjoying your studies and find a lot of success with us.


Feel free to shoot through any questions you have throughout your studies.


Cheers,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Edson Congolo
Friday at 02:56 PM
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Hello, I have done a couple of telephone Interviews, but it was more like introduction to go to the next phase.

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 04:23 PM
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Hello Sarrina,


Thanks for taking the time to comment and share your new English language skills.


Please feel free to ask us any questions you have here or direct to your teacher in the ‘MyTeacher’ feature.


Cheers,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Sarrina
Sunday at 11:33 AM
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Hello there,

I haven’t done telephone interviews and didn’t hear acquaintances did those.

I like interviews face to face.

Best regards,

Sarrina

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 08:29 AM
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Hi there Khalid,


Thanks for taking the time to post and share. 👍


If you ever have any questions, let us know here or through your Premium Plus teacher messenger.


Kindly,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

khalid
Sunday at 07:17 PM
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Well, I don't remember that I did a telephone interviews, but I know that I'll do terribly if i have a chance 😅

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 03:16 PM
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Hello Chanon,


Thanks for taking the time to post. Everything is fine over here, thanks for asking.


Job interviews can be rather nerve-racking, so be assured you aren't alone in that.


I would just suggest changing to this: ".... I did terribly in most of them" (Add suffix -ly to 'terrible).


I hope this is helpful to you. 😄👍


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Chanon
Sunday at 11:47 AM
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Hi EnglishClass101! How is everything going? So to answer your question, I think I've never really had any telephone interviews before. When I come to think about it, my job interviews were all face to face and I did terrible in most of them. haha

*Feel free to correct my grammar or advise me a better version of the phrases I used! I would really appreciate that! Have a nice day!