Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

Intro

Barbara: Good afternoon!
Braden: Braden here. Use the Right English Preposition Combinations for Effective Negotiations. In this lesson, you’ll learn about Adjective and preposition combinations, part 1 and Negotiation.
Barbara: This conversation takes place in the afternoon, on the phone.
Braden: And it’s between Sarah and a hotel manager
Barbara: Sarah has never met the hotel manager, so things start off professionally but then take a turn.
Braden: Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Sarah: My name is Sarah Walker, and I'm calling from the University of Indiana.
Hotel Manager: Ah yes! You guys are famous for that international seminar you do every year.
Sarah: Thank you! We're very excited about this year.
Hotel Manager: Excellent. How may I help you?
Sarah: This year we're organizing the seminar in March, and we're going to need rooms for fifteen delegates.
Hotel Manager: I can help you with that. What are the dates?
Sarah: I'd like to know the daily rates first.
Hotel Manager: Then I need to know what kind of rooms you are looking for.
Sarah: Each delegate will have their own room so there will be fifteen, single rooms. It would also be nice if they were quiet rooms. Last year some of the delegates were irritated by being too close to the pool and not being able to sleep.
Hotel Manager: That will be just fine. We have some very quiet rooms on the 5th floor overlooking the river.
Sarah: Those sound expensive. We're on a university budget mind you.
Hotel manager: Don't worry too much about that. The daily rates in March are different from other times of the year. What are the dates exactly?
Sarah: It will be for four days during the first full week of March; the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: So, we wanted to talk a little bit about Negotiation
Barbara: Negotiation is defined as a dialogue between two or more individuals or parties, with the intent of reaching an understanding, resolving a point of difference, or gaining some advantage in the outcome of dialogue.
Braden: In the dialogue, Sarah negotiates reserving rooms for the delegates with the hotel manager.
Barbara: Even though the hotel manager is very friendly and positive about reserving the rooms to Sarah, she is still careful about the details she needs to have addressed.
Braden: It's important that Sarah have this mindset because, even though the hotel manager is friendly, the conversation may turn at any moment.
Barbara: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
Vocabulary and Phrases
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Barbara: behalf [natural native speed]
Braden: in the interests of another
Barbara: behalf [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: behalf [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: may [natural native speed]
Braden: expressing probability or permission
Barbara: may [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: may [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: rooms [natural native speed]
Braden: a part of a structure enclosed by walls, floor, and ceiling
Barbara: rooms [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: rooms [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: delegate [natural native speed]
Braden: a person who represents others in a conference
Barbara: delegate [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: delegate [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: date [natural native speed]
Braden: day of the month specified by the number
Barbara: date [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: date [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: vary [natural native speed]
Braden: differ in quality compared to something else
Barbara: vary [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: vary [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: slightly [natural native speed]
Braden: to a small degree
Barbara: slightly [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: slightly [natural native speed]
: Next:
Barbara: negotiate [natural native speed]
Braden: attempt to reach an agreement
Barbara: negotiate [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: negotiate [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Barbara: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase I can help you with that.
Braden: Grammatically, this is a simple phrase. We point it out because of the context. In a phone call like this one, where Sarah is calling an organization, she could very easily contact someone who doesn’t have the authority to help her.
Barbara: In business settings, this is very common. Often the first person you talk to is the receptionist. Receptionists are rarely allowed to make deals on behalf of the company.
Braden: Because of this, the hotel manager points out that he can help Sarah with this problem. This is a courtesy to Sarah so that she doesn’t waste time explaining her situation or negotiating with someone that, in the end, cannot give her approval.
Braden: Could you break this down?
Barbara: I can help you with that (slowly)
Braden: And one time fast?
Barbara: I can help you with that (fast)
Braden: Our next phrase is daily rates
Braden: “Daily rates” is a phrase that refers to the price for each room per day.
Barbara: She could have said, “How much does a room cost per day?” However, it’s much more natural to say “What are your daily rates?”
Braden: Depending on the hotel and your length of stay, you could also ask for the weekly or monthly rates. Could you break this down?
Barbara: daily rates (slowly)
Braden: And one time fast?
Barbara: daily rates (fast)
Braden: Our last phrase is "mind you." This phrase is interesting because it’s actually very casual. You will often hear mothers use this phrase when talking to their children.
Barbara: At the beginning of the phone call, Sarah and the hotel manager did not know each other. Therefore, they used formal or respectful language when talking to each other.
Braden: The hotel manager was very relaxed in his conversation. This allowed Sarah to also relax in the way she expressed herself. And that’s why such a casual phrase can be used in a conversation that just seconds before was quite formal.
Braden: Could you break this down for us?
Barbara: mind you (slowly)
Braden: And one time fast?
Barbara: mind you (fast)
Braden: Perfect! Let’s take a look at the grammar point.

Lesson focus

Barbara: The focus of this lesson is adjective and preposition combinations, part 1
Braden: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase
Barbara: My name is Sarah Walker, and I’m calling from the University of Indiana.
Braden: Let’s explain a bit about the structure of this lesson. First, we’re going to specify a preposition. Then we’re going to give you a short list of adjectives and a sample sentence using that adjective preposition combination.
Barbara: Also, each group of adjectives has the same or related meanings and use patterns.
Braden: First we’re going to look at the preposition ABOUT. Use the following adjectives followed by 'about'.
Barbara: Use the verb 'to be' with these expressions. Our adjectives are “angry, “annoyed,” “furious about something.”
Braden: For example, “I'm really angry about our losses on the stock market!”
Barbara: Next we have “excited about something” For example, “He's excited about his birthday party next week.”
Braden: Next is, “worried,” or “upset about something” For example, “He's worried about his upcoming examinations.
Barbara: Next is, “sorry about something” For example, “I'm very sorry about losing your book.”
Braden: Now let’s look at the adjective that uses the preposition “AT.” Again, each group of adjectives has the same or related meanings. Use the verb 'to be' with these expressions.
Barbara: Our first adjectives are “good,” “excellent,” “brilliant at something” OR “at doing something.” For example, “They are excellent at planning fun parties.”
Braden: The next set of adjectives are “bad” and “hopeless" as in "hopeless at something” OR at doing something” For example, “Unfortunately, I'm hopeless at being on time.”
Barbara: There is a small subset of adjectives that can use either AT or BY. Again, use the verb 'to be' with these expressions.
Braden: Those adjectives are "amazed,” “astonished,” “shocked,” “surprised at” OR “by something” For example, “I was amazed at his stamina.” or “I was amazed by his stamina.” Same meaning.
Barbara: Our last preposition is the word “FOR.” Use the following adjectives followed by 'for.' Use the verb 'to be' with these expressions.
Braden: First we have “famous for something.” For example, “She's famous for her watercolor paintings.”
Barbara: Next we have “responsible for something.” For example, “You'll have to speak to John, he's responsible for customer complaints.”
Braden: Next is “Sorry for doing something.” For example, “He says he's sorry for shouting at you.”
Barbara: A similar combination is the (to feel or be) sorry for someone For example, “I really feel sorry for Pam.”
Braden: Last, we have the preposition “FROM.” Use the following adjectives followed by 'from.' different from someone,” “something.”
Barbara: For example, “His photographs are very different from his paintings.”

Outro

Braden: That just about does it for today.
Barbara: Thanks for being here.
Braden: Thanks for listening!
Barbara: Bye-bye!

32 Comments

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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:30 PM
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Hi listeners! What did you think of this lesson? How do you negotiate for good hotel room prices?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 05:19 PM
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Hello Muugii,


You are very welcome! That's what we're here for!


In relation to your question, it should say "I'm hopeless at being on time." 😄


I have passed this information on and we will endeavour to have it fixed up ASAP.


Please let us know if you have any questions throughout your studies.


Cheers,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Muugii
Tuesday at 11:32 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Dear team,


Firstly, thank u for all those great lessons.

And here is my question:

Does "Unfortunately, I'm hopeless at being at time" mean I can't be on time?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:14 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Tahar,


Thanks for taking the time to write to us. ❤️️


The last sentence would have been "That's just about it for today..." which means 'that is almost all that is being done today/ there is nothing / not much else to be done.'


I hope this is helpful to you. 😄👍


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Tahar
Tuesday at 06:29 AM
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I just do not understand the last sentence said by Braden to express that the lesson is over.

I think something like " That is just about for today....."

Can you correct me ?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 06:40 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Yifei,


Thanks for getting in touch.


The word "being" is used in the last part of your example sentence as it is being used as the past participle of the verb "be." In this case meaning "having a state of sleep."


I hope this is helpful to you. 😄👍


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Yifei Guan
Thursday at 06:52 AM
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Helle, why is the "being" used in this sentence "Last year some of the delegates were irritated by being too close to the pool and not being able to sleep."? Thank you.

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 08:34 AM
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Hello Md Sohail Ahmad,


A big thank you for your post and the positive feedback!


Please feel free to ask us any questions you have throughout your studies.


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Md Sohail Ahmad
Wednesday at 12:04 AM
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I must say that this the most effective way of learning, its appreciated team English101. Thank you!

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Sunday at 11:49 AM
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Hello Manaureh,


Thanks for taking the time to ask for advice and for the lovely comment.


To assist in recalling new vocabulary. I would practice using the new word in a sentence. You can write these out and say them in the correct context, so that you can remember how and when they are used.


I hope this helps. 😄👍


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Manaureh
Wednesday at 03:48 AM
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Hi there,


Thank you so much for your hard working and providing the good lessons. I have suggestion regarding writing. Is it possible to have a wringing option in dashboard. In my opinion, it'll help us to know the grammar and spelling. I’m going to get a job but I’m worried about spelling and grammar. My writing is not good. I forgot the vocabulary, while I’m speaking. I don’t know, what should I do to remember the vocabulary when I’m speaking. I need your advice.

Thank you for your time.