Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Becky: Asking for Simple Business Information in English. Becky here.
John: Hi, I'm John.
Becky: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to ask for simple information. The conversation takes place at an office.
John: It's between Linda and John Sullivan.
Becky: The speakers are co-workers, therefore, they will speak informal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Linda: Do you know Mr. Lee's telephone number?
John Sullivan: Yes, his office number is 555-1234.
Linda: Yes, I tried that earlier, but he wasn’t in. Do you happen to know his cell phone number?
John Sullivan: Yes, it's 555-5678.
Linda: I'll try there. Thank you very much!
Becky: Listen to the conversation one more time, slowly.
Linda: Do you know Mr. Lee's telephone number?
John Sullivan: Yes, his office number is 555-1234.
Linda: Yes, I tried that earlier, but he wasn’t in. Do you happen to know his cell phone number?
John Sullivan: Yes, it's 555-5678.
Linda: I'll try there. Thank you very much!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Becky: Although the Internet has become essential to business, phone calls are still very important also. How should you answer a business call in the US?
John: When you answer a call, you should state your company's name and then your name, followed by asking if you can help the caller.
Becky: What if you’re the one who called?
John: If you make a call, you should also identify your company and yourself before asking any questions. If you make an internal call, it might be more informal.
Becky: That’s because internal calls sometimes have caller ID, so you may not need to introduce yourself and can instead just say a short greeting before asking any questions.
John: Some companies give their employees business cell phones that the company will pay for, so they should never be used for any personal calls.
Becky: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Becky: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
John: to know [natural native speed]
Becky: to be aware of something
John: to know [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: to know [natural native speed]
Becky: Next, we have...
John: telephone [natural native speed]
Becky: a machine that allows you to speak to other people in a different place
John: telephone [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: telephone [natural native speed]
Becky: Next up is...
John: number [natural native speed]
Becky: symbol representing a quantity
John: number [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: number [natural native speed]
Becky: Next, there’s...
John: office [natural native speed]
Becky: a place where people work, usually on computers
John: office [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: office [natural native speed]
Becky: Next, we have...
John: to happen [natural native speed]
Becky: to take place, to occur
John: to happen [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: to happen [natural native speed]
Becky: And lastly...
John: cell phone [natural native speed]
Becky: a portable telephone
John: cell phone [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: cell phone [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Becky: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
John: office number
Becky: The first word "office" is a noun and refers to a workplace where administrative work is performed. The second word "number" is short for "phone number."
John: The phrase together refers to the telephone number of the office. For example, you can say “Can you tell me your office number?”
Becky: You can switch out "office" for any other number you need. For example "hospital number" or "Mark's number."
Becky: Okay, what's the next word?
John: Not in
Becky: "Not" is an adverb that is used to make sentences negative. "In" is a preposition that means "inside." This phrase is a quick way of saying that a person isn't in a certain place, such as the office.
John: This is a slightly informal phrase, but it's fine to use it in most situations, also in the contracted form. For example, “The doctor isn't in right now.”
Becky: In this case, “is not in” became “isn’t in.”
Becky: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Becky: In this lesson, you'll learn how to ask for simple information. An easy way to ask for simple information is with WH question words. Let’s review them.
John: They are “what,” “where,” “when,” “why,” “who,” and “how.”
Becky: Using these six words, we can make many different questions. Let’s give a sample sentence for each one, starting with “what.”
John: You can say “What time does the meeting start?”
Becky: A question with “where” could be “Where is the meeting?”
John: An example with “when” is “When will the meeting start?”
Becky: Using “why” you could ask “Why were you late this morning?”
John: With “who” you can ask about people, for example “Who will be at the meeting?”
Becky: “How” is usually to ask about method, condition, or quality.
John: For example “How does the fax machine work?”
Becky: To make these questions softer and more polite, you can begin the sentence by saying “Do you know?”
John: For example “Do you know when the meeting will start?” or “Do you know who will be at the meeting?”
Becky: Now let’s see how to answer simple questions and give information.
John: Most of the simple questions we just saw can be answered by using a sentence made by a pronoun followed by a “to be” verb and the answer.
Becky: Listeners, in the lesson notes, you can find a table complete with the personal pronouns and the verb “to be.” Let’s practice, for example, what can you answer to “When is the meeting?
John: You could say “It’s at two p.m.”
Becky: If someone asks “Where is your office?” you could answer “It’s on the third floor.”
John: Remember that for questions about the future, such as “When will the meeting start?” and “Who will be at the meeting?” we need to use the modal verb “will.”
Becky: This follows the pronoun, and goes before the verb.
John: For example “It will start at two p.m.” or “Mr. Baker will be at the meeting.”

Outro

Becky: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
John: See you!

3 Comments

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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Try to ask for some simple information in the comments!

 

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 09:01 AM
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Hello Niket,


Thank you for sharing!! It's great to have you on board with us!


If you ever have any questions regarding your studies, please let me know.


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Niket
Wednesday at 06:34 AM
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thank you very much for this course, i had tried to review my english number counter