Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Becky: Asking For Time Off Work in English. Becky Here.
John: Hi, I'm John.
Becky: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to ask for a day off. The following conversation takes place over the phone.
John: It's between Catherine Smith and Linda.
Becky: The speakers are boss and employee; therefore, they will speak formal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Linda: Mrs. Smith, sorry to call so early...
Catherine Smith: Hello, Linda. What happened?
Linda: I don't feel very good today and I'd rather stay home.
Catherine Smith: Sure, don't worry. Are you going to see a doctor?
Linda: If it gets worse, I will.
Catherine Smith: Okay. Please call back this afternoon and tell me how you are doing.
Linda: I will.
Becky: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Linda: Mrs. Smith, sorry to call so early...
Catherine Smith: Hello, Linda. What happened?
Linda: I don't feel very good today and I'd rather stay home.
Catherine Smith: Sure, don't worry. Are you going to see a doctor?
Linda: If it gets worse, I will.
Catherine Smith: Okay. Please call back this afternoon and tell me how you are doing.
Linda: I will.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Becky: How does time-off work in the U.S.?
John: For employees of private companies, there is no minimum amount of paid leave that employers have to give. However, more than 70% of companies give employees paid leave. The average amount of time off is 10 days a year.
Becky: What about federal employees?
John: Federal employees get at least two weeks.
Becky: Are there other special types of leave, like maternity leave?
John: Maternity leave in the US is short compared to most countries, as it’s only 12 weeks and unpaid.
Becky: What about sick leave?
John: Currently, employers are not required to give employees paid sick leave for short-term illnesses, but unpaid sick leave is guaranteed for serious illnesses.
Becky: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Becky: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
John: Early. [natural native speed]
Becky: The first part of a period of time.
John: Early. [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: Early. [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have...
John: To feel. [natural native speed]
Becky: To experience an emotion.
John: To feel. [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: To feel. [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have...
John: Rather. [natural native speed]
Becky: Used to indicate preference.
John: Rather. [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: Rather. [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have...
John: To stay. [natural native speed]
Becky: To remain, to not leave.
John: To stay. [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: To stay. [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have...
John: To call back. [natural native speed]
Becky: To make a phone call to someone you have already called.
John: To call back. [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: To call back. [natural native speed]
Becky: And lastly...
John: Worse. [natural native speed]
Becky: Comparative form of "bad."
John: Worse. [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: Worse. [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Becky: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
John: What happened?
Becky: The first word, "what," is a question word used to gather more information. "Happened" is the past tense of "happen," which means an event or something that took place.
John: You can use this phrase to ask for details about a past incident, in both formal and informal situations. Here is an example, “The kitchen is such a mess; what happened?”
Becky: If the event you're asking about is already the topic, you can just ask, "what happened?"
Becky: Okay, what's the next word?
John: Feel.
Becky: This means "to experience an emotion."
John: This is a verb that can be used to speak about our health.
Becky: It is typically used with adjectives such as "good," "bad," and "fine." It can be used in both formal and informal situations. Can you give us an example using this word?
John: Sure. For example, you can say, “I don't feel very well today.”
Becky: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Becky: In this lesson, you'll learn how to ask for a day off. As there is no minimum requirement for the number of paid leave days a company must give, taking a day off can differ from company to company.
John: Some companies will be fine with employees taking days off, but with other companies it may be more difficult.
Becky: In any case, you should speak directly to your manager if you need to take a day off.
John: Some companies may require a form to be submitted to HR, while others require you to speak to your manager.
Becky: There are two main things you should tell them—the date and a reason. Let’s review the date.
John: In the US, dates are written and spoken in a month/day/year format. For example, “May 27th, 2017.” If you don’t need to specify the year, you can just say, “July 4th” or “October 11th.”
Becky: Also remember to use ordinal numbers when talking about dates. You can find a complete list in the lesson notes, if you need to review them. Let’s now see how to state the reason for taking a day off.
John: When providing the reason, most people will start by saying, “I have” or “I need,” especially for medical or childcare reasons. For example, “I have a doctor’s appointment,” or “I need to go to a parent meeting at my child’s school.”
Becky: If you are asking for vacations or recreational days, you should only use “I want.”
John: For example, “I want to go on vacation.”
Becky: Sometimes, you need to ask for a day off on short notice. If you’re calling on the day that you need to take off, you should call your manager as early as possible.
John: In this case, it’s better to be more direct and use phrases such as “I need” or “I can’t.” For example, “I can’t come in today, because I don’t have any childcare.”
Becky: Let’s see how you would ask for a day off if you’re feeling sick.
John: When talking about an illness, the key phrase is “I have,” followed by the name of the illness.
Becky: For example, “I have a headache,” or “I have the flu.”
John: In the case of an illness, you have to keep your supervisor updated; however, it is not mandatory to do the same with your co-workers, unless you want to.

Outro

Becky: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
John: See you!

3 Comments

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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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What would you say to ask for a day off from your boss?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 05:47 PM
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Hello Yunchae,


Thank you for posting!


I hope you're enjoying your studies.


Feel free to shoot through any questions you have throughout your studies.


Cheers,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Yunchae Jung
Saturday at 10:06 AM
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I say I want to take a day off with some reasons.

I don't do this often.