Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Becky: Offering an Invitation. Becky here.
John: Hi, I'm John.
Becky: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to accept an invitation. The conversation takes place in an office lounge.
John: It's between Linda and Thomas Gray.
Becky: The speakers are co-workers, therefore, they will speak informal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Linda: Do you have any plans for tomorrow night?
Thomas Gray: No, I'm free.
Linda: After work, all of our co-workers will have dinner at a new restaurant. Do you want to join us?
Thomas Gray: Sure, I'd love to.
Linda: Good! I'll send you a message with the address and other details.
Thomas Gray: That would be great, thanks.
Linda: You're welcome!
Becky: Listen to the conversation one more time, slowly.
Linda: Do you have any plans for tomorrow night?
Thomas Gray: No, I'm free.
Linda: After work, all of our co-workers will have dinner at a new restaurant. Do you want to join us?
Thomas Gray: Sure, I'd love to.
Linda: Good! I'll send you a message with the address and other details.
Thomas Gray: That would be great, thanks.
Linda: You're welcome!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Becky: So Thomas was invited to an after-work gathering with his co-workers.
John: Yeah, things like this aren’t as common in America as in some other countries, but they still happen pretty frequently.
Becky: What kinds of work parties and events happen in the US?
John: It’s usually big organized events for things like Christmas or New Year’s.
Becky: Since they’re organized, are they formal events?
John: They can be, it depends on the company. Some might have black tie events at posh hotels, others might have a casual dinner in local restaurants.
Becky: There may also be events in the year.
John: Yes, companies might have an event to mark their anniversaries or success, or even one at the end of the financial year.
Becky: Financial years run from April to April in America.
John: Also, there might be informal events that aren’t company wide.
Becky: Yes, if you’re good friends with your co-workers you might get invited to things such as birthday parties and weddings.
John: Some co-workers might even go out for drinks on a Friday night to celebrate the end of the work week.
Becky: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Becky: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
John: plans [natural native speed]
Becky: something you intend to do
John: plans [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: plans [natural native speed]
Becky: Next, we have...
John: free [natural native speed]
Becky: having no commitments or plans
John: free [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: free [natural native speed]
Becky: Next up is...
John: co-workers [natural native speed]
Becky: the people you work with in your company
John: co-workers [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: co-workers [natural native speed]
Becky: Next, there’s...
John: to join [natural native speed]
Becky: to connect, become a part of
John: to join [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: to join [natural native speed]
Becky: Then, we have...
John: sure [natural native speed]
Becky: having no doubt about something
John: sure [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: sure [natural native speed]
Becky: Next, we have...
John: address [natural native speed]
Becky: a description of the location of a place
John: address [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: address [natural native speed]
Becky: And lastly...
John: other [natural native speed]
Becky: not the specified object, a different one
John: other [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: other [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Becky: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
John: plans
Becky: ...meaning "something you intend to do."
Becky: This is a noun.
John: It’s used to talk about a proposal for doing something.
Becky: You can use this with anyone, such as friends or co-workers, to see if they are doing anything at a certain time.
John: “Plans” is the plural form of “plan,” and in most cases, we usually say “plans.”
Becky: Yes, even if only one thing is scheduled, we still say “plans.” Can you give us an example using this word?
John: Sure. For example, you can say “I'm not free on Sunday; I have plans.”
Becky: Okay, what's the next word?
John: free
Becky: ...meaning "having no commitment or plans."
Becky: This is an adjective.
John: It kind of links to the last word we heard, “plans.”
Becky: Yes, it does. Neat link!
John: We use “free” to say that we have no plans.
Becky: Can you give us an example using this word?
John: Sure. For example, you can say “Let's meet for lunch tomorrow, as I'm free all day.”
Becky: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Becky: In this lesson, you'll learn about how to accept an invitation. Earlier in this lesson, we spoke about formal work parties, such as for Christmas and New Year’s.
John: And also informal events, such as a co-worker's birthday party or after-work drinks.
Becky: Invitations depend on how formal the event is. For a formal event, invitations are usually in writing.
John: When you accept or decline the invitation, you should also do it in writing by the deadline.
Becky: If you have invited someone and they haven’t replied, you can politely remind them.
John: Yes, you can say something like “Have you received my wedding invitation?” or “Did you get the invite to the company party?”
Becky: Asking if they have received the invitation instead of asking if they are coming is more polite.
John: If it is an informal party, you don’t need to invite people in writing.
Becky: No, you can just ask them using phrases such as “I’m having…” or “I’m holding…”
John: “I’m having a birthday party” or “I’m holding a housewarming party.”
Becky: If it is a work party that you have organized or are telling people about, you can use “There is…”
John: “There is a New Year’s party.”
Becky: To add in extra information about time and date, you need to use prepositions.
John: Use the preposition “on” for days - “on Monday.” For time and place, you use “at” - “at 3pm,” “at the Italian restaurant.”
Becky: In really informal invites, these prepositions are often dropped. Let’s hear some examples.
John: “I’m having a birthday party on Saturday at seven p.m. at the Italian restaurant across the street.” and “I’m holding a housewarming party, Saturday, seven p.m., my place.”
Becky: To accept an informal invitation, you can just reply verbally.
John: “Sure, sounds great! Thank you”
Becky: “I’d love to, thanks.”
John: “Thanks for inviting me. I’d love to come.”
Becky: And if you want to know how to decline...
John: ...that will be in a later lesson!

Outro

Becky: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
John: See you!

3 Comments

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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Do you like after work gatherings?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 01:13 PM
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Hello Gabriel,


Thank you for sharing. 😄😄


I hope you're enjoying your studies with us.


Feel free to shoot through any questions you have throughout your studies.


Cheers,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Gabriel
Sunday at 11:34 PM
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I don't like to work after work gatherings. Normally my co-workers and me usually eat and drink something after them. But of course not alcohol drinks.