Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Becky: Introducing Your Boss to a Client in English. Becky here.
John: Hi, I'm John.
Becky: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to introduce your boss. The conversation takes place at an office.
John: It's between Linda, Paul Handerson, and Catherine Smith.
Becky: The speakers are strangers, therefore, they will speak formal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Linda: Mr. Handerson, this is Green &Blue's vice president, Mrs. Smith.
Paul Handerson: Mrs. Smith, nice to meet you. I'm Paul Handerson, sales manager at Rainbow's.
Paul Handerson: I believe we’ve spoken on the phone a couple of times.
Catherine Smith: Oh, yes. Nice to meet you.
Paul Handerson: Let me introduce you to our company's CEO. He should be in his office.
Paul Handerson: Could you please have a seat, and I’ll see if he finished his morning meeting.
Becky: Listen to the conversation one more time, slowly.
Linda: Mr. Handerson, this is Green &Blue's vice president, Mrs. Smith.
Paul Handerson: Mrs. Smith, nice to meet you. I'm Paul Handerson, sales manager at Rainbow's.
Paul Handerson: I believe we’ve spoken on the phone a couple of times.
Catherine Smith: Oh, yes. Nice to meet you.
Paul Handerson: Let me introduce you to our company's CEO. He should be in his office.
Paul Handerson: Could you please have a seat, and I’ll see if he finished his morning meeting.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Becky: Are business fairs or exhibitions common in the US?
John: Well, as one of the top nations for industry in the world, the US hosts a huge range of international fairs.
Becky: Business events are a great way to advertise your brand and find new clients. What does a trade fair consist of?
John: At trade fairs, many companies with specific trades, or companies that belong to specific industries, come together to display their goods and services.
Becky: So, it’s a great way to make contacts and see what the competition is doing!
John: A good showing at a trade fair can help a business pick up new clients.
Becky: Another business event is a conference.
John: Right, conferences are also great for networking. So if you ever go to one, make sure to have your business cards ready!
Becky: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Becky: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
John: vice president [natural native speed]
Becky: the second in command in a company or country, next to the president
John: vice president [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: vice president [natural native speed]
Becky: Next, we have...
John: to let [natural native speed]
Becky: to allow
John: to let [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: to let [natural native speed]
Becky: Next, there’s...
John: to believe [natural native speed]
Becky: to accept something as true
John: to believe [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: to believe [natural native speed]
Becky: Then, there’s....
John: couple of times [natural native speed]
Becky: twice
John: couple of times [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: couple of times [natural native speed]
Becky: Next up is...
John: CEO [natural native speed]
Becky: acronym for Chief Executive Officer – the highest ranking executive in a company
John: CEO [slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: CEO [natural native speed]
Becky: And lastly...
John: to have a seat [natural native speed]
Becky: to sit down
John: to have a seat[slowly - broken down by syllable]
John: to have a seat [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Becky: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
John: to let
Becky: This is a verb that means "to allow."
John: You can use this verb in any situation when permission is being given to or by another person.
Becky: Remember that both the past tense and past participle of this verb are "let."
John: Here is a sample sentence - “Let me carry those bags for you.”
Becky: Okay, what's the next phrase?
John: to have a seat
Becky: "Have" means “to possess,” and "seat" refers to something you can sit on, like a chair. All together, the phrase means "to sit down."
John: This phrase is used all the time, usually when asking someone else to sit down.
Becky: For example, you can say "Please have a seat while you wait."
John: You can also say "to take a seat."
Becky: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Becky: In this lesson, you'll learn how to introduce your boss.
John: When you introduce your boss or supervisor in English, be sure to indicate their position. That will allow your business partner to understand that they're being introduced to someone who they can refer to when making important requests.
Becky: Now, let's see how to do that in a clear way. Here are two examples from the dialogue.
John: We heard two sentences. The first was “Mr. Handerson, this is Green &Blue's vice president, Mrs. Smith.”
Becky: The second was “Let me introduce you to our company's CEO.”
John: As you may already know, We use the phrase "this is" as a formula when introducing people to each other.
Becky: Remember also that in English-speaking countries, the use of gestures is very important. In America, when we introduce someone saying, "This is...," often, we will gesture toward the person we are introducing as we say the person's name.
John: Usually, we perform this gesture with the palm of the hand facing up and with all fingers touching each other.
Becky: Okay, following up, after introducing someone, you should state the position and the name of the person you are introducing. What are some of the most common roles in an American company?
John: First, there is the “CEO.”
Becky: As we already said “CEO” stands for Chief Executive Officer.
John: The “CEO” is the most senior corporate employee at an organization.
Becky: There can also be the “president,” which is the leader of a company or organization.
John: The second in charge, behind the president, is usually called “vice president.”
Becky: Following that, we could have the “head of marketing,” which is the employee in charge of the department responsible for creating, engaging, and maintaining customers.
John: Also the “head of accounting” or the employee in charge of the department responsible for the company’s finances.
Becky: The “head of sales” is the employee in charge of the department responsible for selling the company’s products.
John: The “head of HR” is the employee in charge of the department responsible for employee issues.
Becky: We could also be introduced to a “secretary” or “personal assistant,” an employee who deals with admin duties, such as handling visitors, organizing meetings or writing letters.
John: Most job titles in English are not gender specific, so you can use them for men and women.
Becky: Probably the main exception is “chairman,” a title used for a person who is the leader of an organized group, such as the board of directors. Over time, “chairman” has been falling out of favor and instead you might hear “chairperson” or simply “chair.” Let’s wrap up this lesson with a couple of sample sentences.
John: You can say "I'd like to introduce you to our President, Mr. Orton." or "This is our receptionist, Mr. Styles."

Outro

Becky: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
John: See you!

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Monday at 06:30 PM
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Try to introduce your boss!

English101.com
Monday at 11:46 AM
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Hello Marlon!


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marlon
Wednesday at 03:15 AM
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