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๐Ÿ˜„ ๐Ÿ˜ž ๐Ÿ˜ณ ๐Ÿ˜ ๐Ÿ˜’ ๐Ÿ˜Ž ๐Ÿ˜  ๐Ÿ˜† ๐Ÿ˜… ๐Ÿ˜œ ๐Ÿ˜‰ ๐Ÿ˜ญ ๐Ÿ˜‡ ๐Ÿ˜ด ๐Ÿ˜ฎ ๐Ÿ˜ˆ โค๏ธ๏ธ ๐Ÿ‘

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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Did you get it right?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 06:28 AM
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Hello Kevin,


Glad you enjoyed this conversation and thanks for taking the time to post your great question!๐Ÿ‘


As a grammar rule we would usually use the word "on" before any days of the week. "On" is sometimes replaced by "that," "this," or "next" when the day being discussed is being highlighted in the conversation.


For example, the start of the conversation for your example, might have been... "Are you able to meet next Monday, or any days next week?" - response: "I have a meeting that Monday morning and the exhibition on Tuesday or Wednesday."


"That," "this," and "next" are often used as prepositions for days of the week often even though, "that," "this," and "next," are commonly used to refer to objects.


In relation to your second example, this appears to be a promotional sign, the "on" has been dropped to minimise word count. It is also a type of slang to drop the "on" before days of the week. I often hear it with British English speakers.


I hope this is helpful to you! ๐Ÿ˜„


Please feel free to shoot through any questions you have throughout your studies.


Sincerely,

ร‰va

Team EnglishClass101.com

Kevin
Tuesday at 05:18 AM
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hi, I like this conversation.

but I have a question about the preposition before the Monday or other days.

1) I have a meeting that Monday morning and the exhibition on Tuesday and Wednesday; no preposition "on" before Monday, "on" before Tuesday and Wednesday;

2) 15 percent off Monday to Thursday and 5 percent off on Friday.

when should we add the preposition "on" before? when shouldn't?

thank you!

EnglishClass101.com
Monday at 07:30 PM
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Hello Jianghui,


Thank you for your post and the positive feedback! I am pleased to hear you are enjoying our lessons. ๐Ÿ˜„๐Ÿ˜„


The statement you didn't understand means - the person who is stating this will be finished the activities they have to do around the exhibition by a certain time mentioned earlier in the conversation.


Please let us know if you have any more questions.


Cheers,

Eva

Team EnglishClass101.com

jianghui
Wednesday at 10:05 AM
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Hello

This conversation is wonderful.


I donโ€™t know the meaning of this sentence-โ€˜Iโ€™ll be done with the exhibition by then.โ€™


Thanks for your reply

Francis
Saturday at 10:07 AM
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Yep!