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Lesson Transcript

New Yearโ€™s Day
"Black-eyed peas?" I asked.
"Gotta have 'em," my husband said, rubbing his stomach in anticipation.
"They're the best when they've been cooked down with some bacon or ham and get all mushyโ€ฆmmmm."
"Never heard of it," I said.
"What?" He was shocked.
"You're kidding, right?" No, I wasn't kidding. I had never heard of the New Year's Day tradition of eating black-eyed peas for luck. In fact, I had never eaten black-eyed peas in my life. Not even once.
"Maybe it's a Southern thing," I said.
Since moving to the Southern United States from Southern California ten years ago, I have learned many new things, the main thing being that American culture can be vastly different from region to region. The American South is no exception.
Take tobacco, for instance. It is not just something that comes rolled in a cigarette and gets you kicked out of California bars. Tobacco is a way of life. Ask just about any Southerner over the age of thirty, and he'll tell you a story about farming tobacco. It has to be planted and picked by hand, and then the leaves must be dried in barns before going to auction. Modern tobacco barns are made of metal and run by electricity, but drive down any North Carolina country road, and you will see a wooden tobacco barn leaning to one side, its metal roof waiting to rust away. Many Southerners have vivid memories of climbing into the rafters of those old barns to hang tobacco sticks laden with leaves over propane heaters to dry.
In ten years, I have become enamored with the culture of the South.
I have walked into many old tobacco barns and seen the ghosts of family. And every New Year's morning, I eat black-eyed peas.
What do you do for good luck?

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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:30 PM
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New Year’s Day

"Black-eyed peas?" I asked.
"Gotta have 'em," my husband said, rubbing his stomach in anticipation.
"They're the best when they've been cooked down with some bacon or ham and get all mushy…mmmm."
"Never heard of it," I said.
"What?" He was shocked.

"You're kidding, right?" No, I wasn't kidding. I had never heard of the New Year's Day tradition of eating black-eyed peas for luck.  In fact, I had never eaten black-eyed peas in my life. Not even once.

"Maybe it's a Southern thing," I said.

Since moving to the Southern United States from Southern California ten years ago, I have learned many new things, the main thing being that American culture can be vastly different from region to region. The American South is no exception.

Take tobacco, for instance. It is not just something that comes rolled in a cigarette and gets you kicked out of California bars. Tobacco is a way of life. Ask just about any Southerner over the age of thirty, and he'll tell you a story about farming tobacco. It has to be planted and picked by hand, and then the leaves must be dried in barns before going to auction. Modern tobacco barns are made of metal and run by electricity, but drive down any North Carolina country road, and you will see a wooden tobacco barn leaning to one side, its metal roof waiting to rust away. Many Southerners have vivid memories of climbing into the rafters of those old barns to hang tobacco sticks laden with leaves over propane heaters to dry.

In ten years, I have become enamored with the culture of the South.

I have walked into many old tobacco barns and seen the ghosts of family.  And every New Year's morning, I eat black-eyed peas.

What do you do for good luck?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 09:26 AM
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Hi there XY,


Thanks for your question.


"Ghosts" in this sentence is in reference to 'the past of the family.'


Feel free to shoot through any questions you have throughout your studies.


Cheers,

ร‰va

Team EnglishClass101.com

XY
Monday at 04:15 PM
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Hello there. I don't quite understand what the "ghosts" means in this sentence:


"I have walked into many old tobacco barns and seen the ghosts of family."


Is the "ghosts" refer to those old tobacco barns that no longer in use? Or the old memories?


Thank you in advance for your answer!

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Sunday at 07:40 AM
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Hi Amy,


Thank you for leaving the comment.


If you have any questions, please let us know. :)


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team Englishclass101.com

Amy
Saturday at 12:36 PM
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Interesting

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 05:09 PM
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Hi suncheol,


Thank you for your kind comment! I hope that you continue to enjoy studying with us!


Kellie

Team EnglishClass101.com

suncheol
Friday at 11:17 AM
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What a wonderful English learning tool!

I feel happy to use this site to improve my English.

Thank you.

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 04:30 PM
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Hi Paul,


To be "kicked out" of somewhere means to be forced to leave. You can use it anytime someone is asked to leave somewhere before they are ready to go.


I hope that helps!

Kellie

Team EnglishClass101.com

Paul
Tuesday at 06:51 AM
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Hi,

I didn't understand this sentence ''It is not just something that comes rolled in a cigarette and gets you kicked out of California bars.'' What it means gets you kicked out?

TeamEnglishClass101.com
Thursday at 09:41 AM
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Hi Andreas,

Thank you!

The PDF has been fixed, and you can now see the definitions :)


Jessi

Team EnglishClass101.com

Andreas
Saturday at 07:37 PM
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"Definition" of the vocabulary words are missing in the "lesson notes"