Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

Chihiro: Chihiro here! Basic Bootcamp , Lesson 2 - Basic English Sentence Structure
None (manual write in):
Ryan: Hey everybody, I'm Ryan and you're listening to Basic Bootcamp Lesson 2 - Basic English Sentence Structure
Chihiro: Thanks for joining us, I'm Chihiro and welcome to EnglishClass101.com where you can learn English in a fun and fast way!
Ryan: So, what are we talking about today Chihiro?
Chihiro: In this lesson you'll will learn how to say where you are from
Ryan: This conversation takes place nowhere in particular
Chihiro: The conversation is between Sonya and Javier
Ryan: The speakers will be mentioning where they are from
Chihiro:

Lesson conversation

A: Hello, I am Sonya. I am Korean.
B: Hi, I'm Javier. I'm Panamanian.
English Host: Letโ€™s hear the conversation one time slowly.
A: Hello, I am Sonya. I am Korean.
B: Hi, I'm Javier. I'm Panamanian.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Chihiro: Hmm, short dialogue!
Ryan; Yeah, we kept it short and sweet this time.
Chihiro: In English, the name of a country's primary language can be the same word as the nationality in that country.
Ryan: For example, "German" is the person and "German" is the language. However, many countries are different as well. For example, "Costa Rican" is the person and "Spanish" is the language.
Vocabulary and Phrases
Chihiro: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Ryan: Korean [natural native speed]
Chihiro: person born or an inhabitant of Korea
Ryan: Korean [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: Korean [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: Panamanian [natural native speed]
Chihiro: person born or an inhabitant of Panama
Ryan: Panamanian [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: Panamanian [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: Australian [natural native speed]
Chihiro: person born or an inhabitant of Australia
Ryan: Australian [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: Australian [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: Chilean [natural native speed]
Chihiro: person born or an inhabitant of Chile
Ryan: Chilean [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: Chilean [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: South African [natural native speed]
Chihiro: person born or an inhabitant of South Africa
Ryan: South African [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: South African [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: Sudanese [natural native speed]
Chihiro: person born or an inhabitant of Sudan
Ryan: Sudanese [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: Sudanese [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: New Zealander [natural native speed]
Chihiro: person born or an inhabitant of New Zealand
Ryan: New Zealander [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: New Zealander [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: Greenlandic [natural native speed]
Chihiro: person born or an inhabitant of Greenland
Ryan: Greenlandic [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: Greenlandic [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: Polish [natural native speed]
Chihiro: person born or an inhabitant of Poland
Ryan: Polish [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: Polish [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: Iraqi [natural native speed]
Chihiro: person born or an inhabitant of Iraq
Ryan: Iraqi [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: Iraqi [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Chihiro: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Ryan: The first word/phrase weโ€™ll look at is....
Chihiro: Let's take a closer look at the endings for a few countries. Some countries end in -ian, such as Australians live in Australia.
Ryan: And some end in -ean, like Chileans from Chile.
Chihiro: Some are simply -an, as in a South Africans living in South Africa.
Ryan: And some end in -ese. We have the Sudanese in Sudan.
Chihiro: Next up is -er, who we have New Zealanders in New Zealand as an example.
Ryan: And one that is a little rare would be -ic such as Greenlandic for somebody from Greenland.
Chihiro: There's -ish for those who are Polish from Poland.
Ryan: And finally, just a single letter -i like Iraqis from Iraq.
Chihiro: Okay, we don't suggest you remember all of these, although if you do it would be great.
Ryan: But at least try to remember the ones that are perhaps in surrounding countries, and your own of course!

Lesson focus

Chihiro: Now, onto the grammar part, English word order is usually SVO - subject, verb, object. In other words, the subject comes first, then the verb, then the object. This is flexible sometimes, but you can never go wrong with this order.
Ryan: We use the verb "to be" to indicate the identity of something. We conjugate this irregular verb that as follows
Chihiro: Here are some examples of sentences using the verb "to be" to indicate nationality in the SVO order. Some may sound very short because of the contraction, but nevertheless, the SVO is there.
Ryan: Okay, we'll use different ethnicities to give you a variety of countries. Chihiro, the first example?
Chihiro: "I'm Pakistani."
Ryan: "We are Nigerian."
Chihiro: "She's British."
Ryan: "They are French."
Chihiro: You might want to use the non contracted regular form when you want to make a statement or when you want some emphasis. That just about does it for this lesson.

16 Comments

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๐Ÿ˜„ ๐Ÿ˜ž ๐Ÿ˜ณ ๐Ÿ˜ ๐Ÿ˜’ ๐Ÿ˜Ž ๐Ÿ˜  ๐Ÿ˜† ๐Ÿ˜… ๐Ÿ˜œ ๐Ÿ˜‰ ๐Ÿ˜ญ ๐Ÿ˜‡ ๐Ÿ˜ด ๐Ÿ˜ฎ ๐Ÿ˜ˆ โค๏ธ๏ธ ๐Ÿ‘

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:30 PM
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EnglishClass101.com
Monday at 04:24 PM
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Hello Pd,


Thankyou for your post. I'm sorry you didn't see Iran in this lesson, there are so many countries in the world we couldn't use every country as an example or we'd be here all year reading it. ๐Ÿ˜„


Feel free to ask us any questions should you have any.


Sincerely,

Eva

Team EnglishClass101.com

pd
Tuesday at 04:11 AM
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it is for me hard to hear the others countrise near in iran but you dont use name iran๐Ÿ˜ ๐Ÿ˜ 

Englishclass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 04:19 AM
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Hi Aleksander,


Thank you for posting.


Almost there, you're Ukrainian :wink:


Feel free to let us know if you have any questions.


Cristiane

Team Englishclass101.com

Aleksander
Thursday at 05:56 PM
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Hi there! my name is Aleksander , and I'm from Ukraine. So, who am I? Ukrainean, isn't it?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 02:06 PM
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Hi Ammar,


How is life in Turkey? I hope that it is good :thumbsup:


Kellie

Team EnglishClass101.com

Ammar
Sunday at 02:01 AM
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I'm Syrian , but now I'm living in Turkey .....

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 03:57 PM
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Dear Nathoura4299,

The correct version is actually the "word on the street!"

Thank you and have a great weekend!

Kind regards,

Gabriella

Team EnglishClass101.com

Nathoura4299
Friday at 04:52 PM
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Hi,


thank you for your answer, I now understand... I have another question that has nothing to do with the current lesson. Which of the follonwing is correct : the talk of the street of the word of the street?


Thank you!

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 03:21 PM
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Hi Nathoura,


Actually, "becoming accent," is not an English phrase. Becoming, which is a gerund, can be followed with an adjective. For example, "I am becoming green." Or, it can be followed by a noun phrase that starts with an article. For example, "I am becoming a teacher."


Great question!

Adam


Team EnglishClass101.com

Nathoura4299
Tuesday at 07:47 PM
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Hello,


I am from Madagascar and so please to be part of Englishclass101.com! I am a new learner...


What does "becoming accent" mean? Is it pejorative?


Thank you!