Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Gina: Hi, I’m Gina and welcome back to EnglishClass101.com
Gabriella: Hi everyone, I’m Gabriella
Gina: This is British English Basic Basic Boot Camp Lesson 4 – Counting 1 to 100 in English
Gabriella: In this lesson you’re going to learn about the numbers from 1 to 100. The conversation takes a place at home. It’s between two friends.
Gina: Okay, let’s listen to the conversation.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Gina: We’re going to talk a lot in this lesson about how to say numbers.
Gabriella: Yes, we’re going to teach you how to say every number up to 100, and also how to use numbers when they’re being used in the context of orders.
Gina: I think we should also speak a little about how numbers are written, don’t you?
Gabriella: Yes. English uses Arabic numbers, and these are very commonly used across a lot of the world so most, if not all, of our listeners will already be familiar with them.
Gina: I’m sure our listeners know how to write “one” or “two” already. But what about order numbers, called ordinal numbers, such as “first” or “second”?
Gabriella: We can spell them out of course, such as F-I-R-S-T for first, but there is a shorthand way of writing them.
Gina: I like shortcuts, so let’s hear about them!
Gabriella: For ordinal numbers that end in “st”, like “first”, we write the number and then S-T.
Gina: So “first” would be the number 1, then S-T.
Gabriella: Yes, it would. “Second” is written with the number 2 followed by N-D and “third” with the number 3 followed by R-D.
Gina: Most ordinal numbers end in a “~th” sound, such as “fourth” or “fifth”.
Gabriella: Ah, those are easy. It’s just the number followed by T-H and they all follow that same pattern.
Gina: So “sixth” is the number 6 followed by T-H?
Gabriella: That’s right.
Gina: Okay, thanks for the explanation! Don’t forget to check the lesson notes so that you can actually see these numbers written down.
Gabriella: Yeah, that’s important!
Gina: Let’s move onto the vocabulary now.
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Gina: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson. Our first word for this lesson is “foreign”.
Gabriella: This refers to anything from a different country. You hear it a lot in phrases such as “foreign country” or “foreign food”.
Gina: We can use it as a standalone word too, can’t we? We can just say “that’s foreign” to explain it’s from a different country.
Gabriella: That’s right. And although we can say “foreign people”, it’s far more common to say “foreigner” to describe people from different countries.
Gina: Sure. Next we have two words that are similar, so we’ve grouped them together and they are “Euro” and “pound”.
Gabriella: These are both currencies – types of money. The Euro is used in the European Union or EU, and the pound is used in the UK.
Gina: The UK is in the EU, but chose to keep its own money instead of switching to the Euro.
Gabriella: Yes. And a pound consists of a hundred pennies.
Gina: Our final item for this lesson is “recently”.
Gabriella: “Recently” refers to the time leading up to today. It isn’t very specific though.
Gina: What do you mean by that?
Gabriella: If I say that I’ve been ill recently, it doesn’t tell you how long I’ve been ill for. It could be a couple of days, it could be a week… It doesn’t tell you the exact time frame. It’s used for more general statements.
Gina: If we want to be specific we would say “for three days” or “a week”.
Gabriella: Yes, we would.
Gina: Okay. Let’s move onto the grammar now.
GRAMMAR POINT
Gina: In this lesson, you’ll learn all about numbers and how to use them.
Gabriella: Firstly, we should define the two types of numbers, so that people don’t mix them up.
Gina: Okay. We have cardinal numbers and ordinal numbers, and they both serve a different purpose.
Gabriella: Yes. If you use the wrong one in a sentence it won’t make sense, so be careful.
Gina: Firstly, what are cardinal numbers?
Gabriella: These are numbers concerned with quantity. “There are three apples.” “I worked for two days.”
Gina: So numbers such as “one”, “two”, “three”, “four” and so on.
Gabriella: Yes. The easy numbers!
Gina: There are also ordinal numbers, and we touched on these earlier.
Gabriella: Yes, we did. These are numbers concerned with order. “I came first in the race.” “This is my fourth attempt.”
Gina: So numbers such as “first”, “second”, “third” and “fourth.”
Gabriella: Once you get past twenty, English numbers fall into a regular pattern that is quite easy to master.
Gina: You just have to get to twenty first, right?
Gabriella: Right! So let’s get to twenty right now.
Gina: I’ll do one to ten, and then you can take us up to twenty.
Gabriella: Okay.
Gina: (pause between each) One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten.
Gabriella: Eleven, twelve, thirteen, fourteen, fifteen, sixteen, seventeen, eighteen, nineteen.
Gina: So there’s a small pattern there, as some numbers have “~teen” added at the end to make new numbers.
Gabriella: Yeah, “four “ becomes “fourteen” for example, but that doesn’t work with all of them.
Gina: No, it doesn’t! So, how about counting to a hundred now?
Gabriella: Firstly we need to run through the multiples of ten.
Gina: I’ll do that. Ten, twenty, thirty, forty, fifty, sixty, seventy, eighty, ninety.
Gabriella: The pattern for the other numbers up to a hundred is that you use a multiple of ten and then add a number from 1 to 9.
Gina: So sixty-three. Forty-two. Eighty-four.
Gabriella: That’s right.
Gina: How about ordinal numbers?
Gabriella: It’s a similar pattern. You take 1 to 10 and then I’ll take 11 to 20 again.
Gina: First, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth, tenth.
Gabriella: Eleventh, twelfth, thirteenth, fourteenth, fifteenth, sixteenth, seventeenth, eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth.
Gina: There are a lot of “~th” sounds there.
Gabriella: There are! Above twenty, you use the multiples of ten again – tenth, twentieth, thirtieth, fortieth, fiftieth, sixtieth, seventieth, eightieth, ninetieth, hundredth.
Gina: But if you want to say the ordinal number of sixty three, you don’t say ‘sixtieth third’, do you?
Gabriella: No, you use “sixty-third” instead. It’s the cardinal number “sixty” plus the ordinal “third”. The ordinal tens are only used for the actual multiple of ten.
Gina: So “forty-second” and “eighty-fourth”.
Gabriella: That’s right.

Outro

Gina: Ok, that’s all for this lesson. Don’t forget to check the lesson notes!
Gabriella: Thanks for listening, and we’ll see you next time!
Gina: Bye!

1 Comment

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Listeners! What is your lucky number?