Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
David: Getting Formal in the UK. David Here.
Kellie: Hello. I'm Kellie.
David: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use the future simple tense to answer formal questions. The conversation takes place at the airport.
Kellie: The speakers are strangers.
David: So they will use formal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Border Officer: Welcome to the UK. Why are you visiting the UK?
Katrina: I am here to study.
Border Officer: How long will you stay for?
Katrina: I will stay for one year.
Border Officer: Where will you live?
Katrina: I will live in London.
Border Officer: Thank you. Enjoy your stay.
David: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Border Officer: Welcome to the UK. Why are you visiting the UK?
Katrina: I am here to study.
Border Officer: How long will you stay for?
Katrina: I will stay for one year.
Border Officer: Where will you live?
Katrina: I will live in London.
Border Officer: Thank you. Enjoy your stay.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
David: Speaking formally in English isn’t as clear cut as in some other languages, is it?
Kellie: No, it isn’t. English doesn’t have the strict rules and distinct formal vocabulary of some other languages, but that doesn’t mean that there is no formal language.
David: Yeah, we heard some formal language in the dialogue, right?
Kellie: We did. If you’re speaking formally, always try to use full sentences instead of just one- or two-word answers. It sounds politer and more respectful to say “I live in Scotland” than to just answer with “Scotland” if you are asked where you live.
David: And it’s better to avoid slang and colloquialisms too, right?
Kellie: Definitely! These can help you sound really natural when you’re talking to friends, but shouldn’t be used in formal situations.
David: Is it important to speak formally?
Kellie: In certain situations it is! If you want to impress people at a job interview, you won’t impress much if you speak to the interviewer in the same way you’d speak to a friend at the pub!
David: But sometimes even situations that you think would be formal, people don’t always speak that way, right?
Kellie: That’s right. Situations can change as people become more relaxed. I think it’s best to start formal, but if the conversation becomes more informal, then it’s okay to change too.
David: So...go with the flow?
Kellie: Yep! Go with the flow!
David: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
David: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Kellie: how [natural native speed]
David: in what way, the way in which
Kellie: how[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: how [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: UK [natural native speed]
David: United Kingdom
Kellie: UK[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: UK [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: to visit [natural native speed]
David: to go to see
Kellie: to visit[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: to visit [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: to study [natural native speed]
David: to spend time and attention to learn something
Kellie: to study[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: to study [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: to stay [natural native speed]
David: to remain somewhere
Kellie: to stay[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: to stay [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: where [natural native speed]
David: question starter, asking for the location of something
Kellie: where[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: where [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: year [natural native speed]
David: a period of twelve months
Kellie: year[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: year [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: to live [natural native speed]
David: to be alive, to occupy a place or home
Kellie: to live[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: to live [natural native speed]
David: And lastly..
Kellie: welcome [natural native speed]
David: to greet the arrival of someone cordially or greatly
Kellie: welcome[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: welcome [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
David: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Kellie: UK
David: meaning United Kingdom.
Kellie: The UK is a country that is made up of four smaller countries. Can you name them, David?
David: Um, England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland?
Kellie: That’s right! The capital of the UK is London, and London is also the capital of England. I guess that the difference between the UK and the four countries can be a little confusing at times.
David: Right. Why did the border officer say “Welcome to the UK” instead of “Welcome to England”? Katrina will be living in England, right?
Kellie: She will be, but it was the UK border that she crossed. There are no borders between the four countries. Although they are countries, maybe it’s easier to think of them as special countries!
David: Can you give us an example using this word?
Kellie: Sure. For example, you can say.. “Fish and chips is a popular dish in the UK.”
David: ..which means that in the UK, people love fish and chips! Okay, what's the next word?
Kellie: Welcome
David: meaning “to warmly greet the arrival of someone.”
Kellie: When you say “welcome” to someone, you should say it with a smile and a friendly attitude. You’re happy that person is here!
David: When can we use this word?
Kellie: An easy way to use it is with the word “to”, so “welcome to” and then add the place.
David: Can you give us an example using this word?
Kellie: Sure. For example, you can say.. “Welcome to New York!”
David: .. which means that the person has just arrived in New York and you’re happy that they’re there! Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

David: In this lesson, you’ll learn about the future simple tense. Kellie, what is the future simple tense?
Kellie: It’s the tense we use to explain what we will do in the future. “I will explain the future simple tense”... Like that.
David: Okay! How do we make a sentence using it?
Kellie: The magic word is “will”. We use “will” plus the infinitive form of a verb.
David: What’s the infinitive form?
Kellie: It’s the dictionary form, but without “to”. So words like eat, drink, walk and talk are infinitive verbs.
David: So it’s “will” plus one of those verbs.
Kellie: Yes, like “I will play football.”
David: “I will study English.”
Kellie: That’s right! The basic pattern is subject first, like “I”, “he” or “she,” then “will,” followed by the verb.
David: “I will go to Glasgow next week.”
Kellie: But, if we add “not” after “will”, we can say what we won’t do.
David: For example, “I won’t eat pizza tomorrow.” “Won’t” is the contraction of “will” and “not”.
Kellie: “I won’t watch TV.”
David: “I won’t forget my homework.”
Kellie: Yes. Subject, then will, then not, then verb.
David: Also, let’s take a look at the formal English again quickly. We talked about using longer sentences earlier, but there are also some words that are best avoided in formal situations.
Kellie: That’s right. It’s okay to say “hi” or “bye” to a friend, but a nice “good morning” or “goodbye” is better in formal conversation.
David: Yeah, and if you miss something or want something repeated, I’m sure that “huh?” or “what?” isn’t a good thing to say.
Kellie: You’d be right there! Try “excuse me” or even a full sentence such as “would you repeat that, please?”
David: Yeah, that sounds better. I’m gonna remember that.
Kellie: “Gonna”? If you’re speaking formally, you should say “I’m going to remember that.”
David: Okay. I’ll make sure to remember that, too!

Outro

David: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Kellie: Bye.

22 Comments

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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners! What is the most formal English phrase that you know?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 09:52 AM
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Hello Nursultan,


You are very very welcome. 😇❤️️ We were so happy to read your positive message!

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

We wish you good luck with your language studies.


Kind regards,

Levente

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Nursultan
Thursday at 06:00 PM
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Great lesson! Thank you for your work EnglishClass101

Hello from Kazakhstan

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 03:42 PM
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Hi there Furkan,


Sounds great Furkan! I hope we can help you to achieve your English language goals!! 😄😄


Feel free to shoot through any questions you have throughout your studies.


Cheers,

Éva

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furkan
Sunday at 02:16 AM
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I start to beginner season 2.

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Tuesday at 11:30 AM
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Hello Pavel,


You're welcome! Thanks for your kind feedback. ❤️️


Please let us know if you ever have any questions throughout your studies, we would be happy to assist.


Sincerely,

Éva

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Pavel
Monday at 09:58 AM
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Great lesson! I appreciate it, thank you.

EnglishClass101.com
Friday at 05:17 PM
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Hello Gundala,


Thank you for posting.

You can find related lessons through these links:

https://www.englishclass101.com/lesson/upper-beginner-25-youre-going-to-make-a-great-english-speaker/

https://www.englishclass101.com/lesson/beginner-lesson-15-he-will-pay-for-that/


Let us know if you have any further questions.

Cheers,

Lena

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Gundala
Thursday at 08:12 AM
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Can you explain the difference using "will" ,"going to" and present continuous tense to talk about action in the future?

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Thursday at 12:55 PM
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Hi mohamed,


Thanks for your positive feedback. You can download this lesson notes and scripts by clicking on the "Download as PDF" button in each section. Let us know if you have any further questions.


Cheers,


Khanh

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Thursday at 12:54 PM
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Hi mohamed,


Thanks for your positive feedback. You can download this lesson by clicking on the downward arrow symbol on the right side of the lesson audio bar (bottom of your screen). Let us know if you have any questions.


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Khanh

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