Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
David: Talking About New Beginnings in English. David Here.
Kellie: Hello. I'm Kellie.
David: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to talk about past experiences. The conversation takes place at the park.
Kellie: The speakers are friends.
David: So they will use informal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Phil: You start university next week, huh?
Katrina: Yeah, I'm nervous. Have you ever studied abroad, Phil?
Phil: No, I haven't. I have worked abroad, though.
Katrina: How was it?
Phil: It was fun! Everyone was really nice and looked after me.
Katrina: I hope people are as nice to me.
Phil: It'll be fine. Everyone has been nice to you so far, right?
Katrina: Yeah, it's been a great experience so far!
David: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Phil: You start university next week, huh?
Katrina: Yeah, I'm nervous. Have you ever studied abroad, Phil?
Phil: No, I haven't. I have worked abroad, though.
Katrina: How was it?
Phil: It was fun! Everyone was really nice and looked after me.
Katrina: I hope people are as nice to me.
Phil: It'll be fine. Everyone has been nice to you so far, right?
Katrina: Yeah, it's been a great experience so far!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
David: Katrina is nervous about starting university. That’s natural, I think.
Kellie: I think so too. It’s also natural to ask people if they have any past experiences that might help.
David: Hearing good stories can really put your mind at ease.
Kellie: They’re also a great way to keep a conversation going. If someone talks about something they have done, or are about to do, then just jump in with “me too!” or “I’ve also…”
David: Yeah, people like to hear about the experiences of others.
Kellie: Yeah, you can compare and contrast past experiences.
David: People also like to hear about things they will do in the future.
Kellie: They can hear the good parts and the bad parts.
David: And hopefully avoid the bad.
Kellie: Hopefully! It’s also good to ask other people if they have any experiences to share.
David: Yeah, it makes you sound interested in those around you.
Kellie: And people like talking about themselves, so it’s a win-win situation.
David: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
David: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Kellie: nervous [natural native speed]
David: uneasy and apprehensive
Kellie: nervous[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: nervous [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: ever [natural native speed]
David: at any time
Kellie: ever[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: ever [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: abroad [natural native speed]
David: outside of the current country
Kellie: abroad[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: abroad [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: to look after [natural native speed]
David: to take care of, to watch out for someone or something
Kellie: to look after[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: to look after [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: everyone [natural native speed]
David: every person, each person
Kellie: everyone[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: everyone [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: far [natural native speed]
David: at or up to a certain point
Kellie: far[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: far [natural native speed]
David: And last
Kellie: experience [natural native speed]
David: knowledge or skill acquired over a period of time
Kellie: experience[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: experience [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
David: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Kellie: nervous
David: meaning "to feel uneasy or apprehensive"
David: Katrina said she was feeling nervous.
Kellie: She did. We can use this word when we are feeling uneasy. It can be in serious, physically threatening situations such as walking through a bad part of town, or more trivial situations like waiting for a show to start.
David: Is it the same as being scared?
Kellie: No. Being nervous can be a good thing. Some people perform better when they are nervous and a little stressed.
David: Do you?
Kellie: I do, actually!
David: Can you give us an example using this word?
Kellie: Sure. For example, you can say.. “I have a job interview later so I'm really nervous.”
David: ..which means "I have a job interview later so I feel apprehensive." Okay, what's the next word?
Kellie: so far
David: meaning "up until now"
David: We know that “far” can mean distance, that something isn’t close.
Kellie: That’s right. But when paired with “so far”, it is talking about time, not distance.
David: Alright. So what does it mean?
Kellie: It means up until this point in time, until now. But it hints that there is more to come.
David: Oh, like “the film has been good so far”.
Kellie: Yeah, if you say that when watching a film, it means it has been good, but it isn’t finished yet so there is still more to go.
David: Can you give us an example using this word?
Kellie: Sure. For example, you can say.. So far it's a draw, but I think England can win.
David: .. which means "Up until now the match is a draw, but I think England can win in the rest of the match". Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

David: In this lesson, you'll learn how to discuss past experiences.
David: To do this, we need to talk about the present perfect tense.
Kellie: Okay, we use this tense to talk about things that have happened in the past. However, we aren’t being specific.
David: So we can’t use it to talk about what we did yesterday.
Kellie: That’s right. Words like “yesterday,” “last week”, “March” or “Friday” can’t be used in this tense. We have to use general time words like “before”, “once” or “already”.
David: How do we make sentences in this form?
Kellie: First you need a subject, then “has” or “have”, followed by the past participle of the verb.
David: Let’s hear an example.
Kellie: If the verb is “walk”, we can make a sentence like “I have walked to school before.”
David: Okay, how about the verb “eat”.
Kellie: I have eaten ostrich.
David: Have you?
Kellie: Yes, I have actually! We can also use this pattern for changes over time. So, if the last time you saw a child they were tiny and now they’re six feet tall, you can say “You have grown tall.”
David: This sentence pattern reminds me of a game we played at university all the time.
Kellie: What game is that?
David: “Have you ever...”
Kellie: Ah, I’ve played that game too! And it does use this sentence pattern. It’s a simple game that asks about past experiences and there is usually a forfeit for anyone that has that experience.
David: That’s right.
Kellie: So that uses the present perfect tense plus “ever” to make a question. “Have you ever been to Spain?”
David: “Have you ever climbed a mountain?”
Kellie: These questions are asking if you have done these activities any time in the past. They’re a great way to ask about past experiences.
David: Katrina asked Phil “Have you ever studied abroad?”
Kellie: Yes, she did. And what did Phil say?
David: “No, I haven’t.”
Kellie: That’s how you answer these questions if you haven’t done the activity. If you have, then say “Yes, I have.”
David: Thanks!

Outro

David: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Kellie: Bye.

1 Comment

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Listeners! Try discussing a past experience here.