Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
David: Visiting a British Hairdresser. David Here.
Kellie: Hello. I'm Kellie.
David: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to give directions for a haircut. The conversation takes place at a hair salon.
Kellie: The speakers are strangers.
David: So they will use informal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
hairdresser: So, what are we doing today?
Katrina: My hair is getting too long now. My fringe is always covering my eyes.
hairdresser: Okay, so we'll cut the fringe. How about the length?
Katrina: I want that shorter too, so maybe four or five inches shorter?
hairdresser: That'll make your hair shoulder length.
Katrina: It'll be the shortest my hair has been in years but that's fine. It'll grow back eventually!
David: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
hairdresser: So, what are we doing today?
Katrina: My hair is getting too long now. My fringe is always covering my eyes.
hairdresser: Okay, so we'll cut the fringe. How about the length?
Katrina: I want that shorter too, so maybe four or five inches shorter?
hairdresser: That'll make your hair shoulder length.
Katrina: It'll be the shortest my hair has been in years but that's fine. It'll grow back eventually!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
David: Are there many hair salons in the UK?
Kellie: Yeah, there are. You’ll find several in big cities and even in small towns and villages. People in the UK usually call them hairdressers though.
David: So “I’m going to the hairdressers” is the same as “I’m going to the hair salon.”?
Kellie: That’s right. There is a wide range of natural hair colours in the UK, and it’s also okay to be a little adventurous with fake colours.
David: I’ve seen some crazy hair styles too!
Kellie: Yeah, although people in customer service or who work for the government will probably tone down the crazy colours and styles.
David: Is it expensive to get a haircut?
Kellie: It depends on where you go. Some hairdressers are very expensive, but most salons have a range of prices that are dependent on the skill level of the hairdresser.
David: So better and more experienced hairdressers cost more?
Kellie: Yes. If you want a really cheap cut, then colleges and universities that teach hairdressing courses will let their students cut your hair for a really low price.
David: That sounds dangerous!
Kellie:Yeah, I wouldn’t trust them with my hair! But each to their own!
David: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
David: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Kellie: today [natural native speed]
David: the present day, after yesterday but before tomorrow, the current day
Kellie: today[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: today [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: hair [natural native speed]
David: the fine filaments that grown from the skin of humans and animals, and especially on the head of humans
Kellie: hair[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: hair [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: long [natural native speed]
David: not short, of great length
Kellie: long[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: long [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: fringe [natural native speed]
David: the sections of hair that cover your forehead and/or the sides of your face
Kellie: fringe[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: fringe [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: to cover [natural native speed]
David: to be over something, to hide or conceal it
Kellie: to cover[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: to cover [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: length [natural native speed]
David: how long something is
Kellie: length[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: length [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: inch [natural native speed]
David: an imperial unit of measurement equivalent to 2.54 centimetres
Kellie: inch[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: inch [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: anyway [natural native speed]
David: despite what has been said before
Kellie: anyway[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: anyway [natural native speed]
David: And lastly..
Kellie: to grow [natural native speed]
David: to increase by natural development
Kellie: to grow[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: to grow [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
David: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Kellie: to grow back
David: meaning "to return to a previous state through natural development"
David: We can use the verb “to grow” when something has become bigger or matured through natural development.
Kellie: Yes. Like a child becoming taller as they age, or a tree getting bigger. By adding “back”, we refer to growth in the past.
David: So it’s not only growing, but it’s growing to a state it used to be in.
Kellie: That’s right. If you had long hair but then cut it short, it won’t stay short. It will grow again.
David: It will grow back.
Kellie: Right.
David: Can you give us an example using this word?
Kellie: Sure. For example, you can say.. My toenails grow back so quickly.
David: ..which means "I cut my toenails but they grow again so quickly." Okay, what's the next word?
Kellie: shoulder length
David: meaning "long enough to reach the shoulders"
David: The shoulders are parts of the body. They’re where our arms are attached, by the base of the neck and top of our trunk.
Kellie: We use “length” to explain how long something is.
David: So if it’s shoulder length...
Kellie:..it’s long enough to reach the shoulders. This is used pretty much exclusively to describe hair length, although you could probably use it for a head covering too.
David: Can we switch out “shoulder” for other parts of the body?
Kellie: Of course! Hair can be “waist length” or even “ankle length” too!
David: Can you give us an example using this word?
Kellie: Sure. For example, you can say.. I want to keep growing my hair until it is shoulder length.
David: .. which means "I want to keep growing my hair until it reaches my shoulders." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

David: In this lesson, you'll learn how to give directions for a haircut.
David: We’ll need to describe the haircut we want, which means...
Kellie: ..adjectives again! We’re going to build on what we learnt in Lesson 18.
David: In Lesson 18, we learned about comparative adjectives and how to use them to compare two things.
Kellie: Now we will learn about superlative adjectives. We can use these to compare not two things, but everything.
David: Why compare two books when you can compare several, or even every book ever?
Kellie: Exactly! Think big! Superlative adjectives follow the same rules as comparative ones. So one-syllable adjectives are grouped together and can be made superlative by adding “e-s-t,” “-est,”
David: For example, “tallest,” “cutest,” and “biggest.”
Kellie: If they have two syllables and end in a “-y”, we add “i-e-s-t”, “-iest.
David: As in, “happiest,” and “scariest.”
Kellie: If it’s two syllables without a “-y,” or three syllables or more then we don’t change the adjective. Instead, we add “most” or “least”.
David:For example, “most beautiful,” “least strange,” “most awake,” and “least convenient.” How about the irregular adjectives? Like “good”? Listeners, remember that the comparative form of that was “better.”
Kellie: The superlative form is “best”.
David: In the dialogue Katrina said “It’ll be the shortest my hair has been in years.”
Kellie: Yeah, that’s a good use of it.
David: Let’s quickly look at the adverb “too”.
Kellie: There are two meanings of “too”. One meaning is “also”, which we covered in an earlier lesson.
David: What is the other meaning?
Kellie: It can also mean excessively. In this case, it’s used before the adjective or noun it is modifying.
David: Like, “My hair is too thick and heavy.”
Kellie: Yes. That means that your hair isn’t just thick and heavy, but that it is too thick and heavy to deal with.
David: Going back to the dialogue again, Katrina says “My hair is getting too long now”.
Kellie: Yeah. She then follows by explaining why her hair is too long.
David: It’s getting in her eyes, right?
Kellie: Right. It’s not just long, it’s so long it’s causing trouble.
David: Thanks for the explanation.

Outro

David: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Kellie: Bye.

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Friday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners! Try giving instructions for a haircut here -