Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
David: Making a Dinner Reservation in English. David Here.
Kellie: Hello. I'm Kellie.
David: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to reserve a table in a restaurant. The conversation takes place over the phone.
Kellie: The speakers are strangers.
David: So they will use formal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Waiter: Adam's restaurant, how may I help you?
Katrina: Hello, I'd like to reserve a table for tomorrow night please?
Waiter: Certainly. For what time?
Katrina: About 7pm, if possible.
Waiter: How many people are in your party?
Katrina: There are four of us. One person is vegan though.
Waiter: That won't be a problem as we have many vegan dishes available. So that's a table for four at 7pm. May I take your name please?
Katrina: It's Katrina. Thank you for your help!
David: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Waiter: Adam's restaurant, how may I help you?
Katrina: Hello, I'd like to reserve a table for tomorrow night please?
Waiter: Certainly. For what time?
Katrina: About 7pm, if possible.
Waiter: How many people are in your party?
Katrina: There are four of us. One person is vegan though.
Waiter: That won't be a problem as we have many vegan dishes available. So that's a table for 4 at 7pm. May I take your name please?
Katrina: It's Katrina. Thank you for your help!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
David: Katrina made a restaurant reservation. To be honest, I think that food in the UK has a bad reputation internationally.
Kellie: Yeah, I think it’s seen as being bland and tasteless.
David: Is that true though?
Kellie: British food isn’t as highly seasoned or spiced as food in other countries, but I don’t think that it’s bland.
David: What type of food is eaten in the UK?
Kellie: A lot of food is quite heavy and hearty, with lots of meat and vegetables. It’s good for colder weather.
David: Oh, like the traditional Sunday roast?
Kellie: Yeah. That’s roast meat, like beef or lamb, lots of vegetables and a family gathering. There’s also savoury pies.
David: Steak and kidney is popular too.
Kellie: It is. But British food is also expanding to include food from other cultures. Indian curry is probably the most popular dish in the UK.
David: What other types of international cuisine can you find in the UK?
Kellie: In the larger cities you can find anything! Italian, Thai, Japanese, Spanish, Mexican…. you name it!
David: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
David: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Kellie: many [natural native speed]
David: consisting of a large amount
Kellie: many[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: many [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: party [natural native speed]
David: a group of people
Kellie: party[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: party [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: person [natural native speed]
David: a human being
Kellie: person[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: person [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: vegan [natural native speed]
David: a person who eats nothing that comes from an animal
Kellie: vegan[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: vegan [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: problem [natural native speed]
David: an obstacle, a source of distress, a negative issue
Kellie: problem[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: problem [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: dish [natural native speed]
David: a particular meal or item of food
Kellie: dish[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: dish [natural native speed]
David: And last..
Kellie: available [natural native speed]
David: not busy, easy to get or use
Kellie: available[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: available [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
David: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Kellie: table for four
David: meaning "a table in a restaurant that can seat four customers”. We learned in the vocabulary of Lesson 17 that “table” can specifically refer to a place where we sit in a restaurant and have food served to us.
Kellie: Right. By adding “for four”, we are asking for a table that seats four people.
David: So we can change the number. For example, “Table for two”, “table for one”, or “table for 45”.
Kellie: That last one is a bit extreme! We can also use “table by” to talk about the location of the table.
David: Oh, like “table by the window” if the restaurant is in a place with nice scenery.
Kellie: Yep.
David: Can you give us an example using this word?
Kellie: Sure. For example, you can say.. Do you have a table for four available?
David: ..which means "Is there a table that will seat four people available?" Okay, what's the next word?
Kellie: party
David: meaning "a group of people"
David: We spoke about parties before in previous lessons.
Kellie: Yes, but that was a different type of party. That was the type of social gathering where people get together to celebrate something. This is different.
David: What is this party?
Kellie: It means a group of people gathered for a particular purpose. If you make a reservation at a restaurant or hotel, they might not ask “for how many people”, but instead ask “how many are in your party?”
David: Okay. I also hear it in politics a lot. The Conservative Party and the Labour Party for example.
Kellie: Yeah, we call them political parties, not political groups.
David: Can you give us an example using this word?
Kellie: Sure. For example, you can say.. We're travelling in a party of five.
David: .. which means "We’re travelling in a group of five people." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

David: In this lesson, you'll learn how to reserve a table in a restaurant.
David: We discussed the phrase “table for four” earlier. Now, let’s take a closer look at the preposition “for”.
Kellie: We’ve spoken about prepositions before and learned that they are a class of words that are used to modify nouns, verbs and adjectives.
David: There are many ways that we can use “for”.
Kellie: We can use it to describe what something is used for.
David: Like “This knife is used for steak.”
Kellie: Yes. That means that the knife being spoken about is a steak knife. You might hear that in a restaurant! Also “He reserved a table for my birthday.”
David: Ah, as it was your birthday, he reserved the table.
Kellie: Yes. The table is for birthday celebrations.
David: What are the other uses?
Kellie: There is also “because of”. For example, “I am working hard for him.”
David: Meaning “Because of him, I am working hard.” He is the reason why you’re working hard.
Kellie: Right. You can put “for” at the start of the sentence too. “For this reason, I was late.”
David: Any more uses?
Kellie: It can also be used for time. “We were at the restaurant for three hours.”
David:Or “The race lasted for five minutes.”
Kellie: We can combine a couple of uses of the word “for” to book a table in a restaurant. For example, “I would like to book a table for three people for seven o’clock.”
David: That uses “for” two times.
Kellie: Yes. The first time, we’re saying that the table will be used by three people, and the second time, we are talking about the time it will be used.
David: So it’s a handy word to remember when booking a restaurant.
Kellie: That’s right. In the dialogue, the waiter said “May I take your name please?” “May” is a modal verb that can be used in many ways, just like “for” can be. Here, the waiter is asking for permission to take the coat.
David: How else can it be used?
Kellie: It can be used for possibility. For example, “It may rain tomorrow.”
David: “It may not rain tomorrow”
Kellie: Well, one of us will be right! It can also be used for suggestions.
David: More specifically, polite suggestion.
Kellie: Yes. It’s not a very forceful suggestion because it’s polite. You may want to remember that.
David: “You may want to…” that’s a common phrase.
Kellie: It’s a good to make polite suggestions.
David: I don’t know… We may want to listen to this lesson again!

Outro

David: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Kellie: Bye.

5 Comments

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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 06:30 PM
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What is your favorite British dish?

Englishclass101.com Verified
Thursday at 09:34 PM
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Hi Janusz Sołtys,


Thank you for your reply! We're glad your doubts were cleared :)


Please let us know if you have any further questions.


Cristiane

Team Englishclass101.com

Janusz Sołtys
Wednesday at 06:15 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Kellie,


Thank you for your help very much. It's useful for me. I'm happy that I can learn English with Englishclass101.com. The lessons are great.


Best Regards


Janusz

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Sunday at 09:56 PM
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Hi Janusz Sołtys,


Although that sentence is correct, I think that "I have never eaten British food, but I hope I will," or "I have never eaten British food, but I hope I will be able to," sounds more natural.


Well done!


Kellie

Team EnglishClass101.com

Janusz Sołtys
Wednesday at 10:06 PM
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I have never eaten British food, but I hope I'll do it.

Is this sentence correct? If not, please correct it.