Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
David: How Many Eggs Do You Need to Make a British Omelette? David here.
Kellie: Hello. I'm Kellie.
David: In this lesson, you’ll learn to use adjectives and numbers to describe what is needed. The conversation takes place at a supermarket.
Kellie: The speakers are friends.
David: So they will use informal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Katrina: I want to make an omelette for tea, so I need eggs.
Phil: The eggs are over here, in this aisle.
Katrina: Hmm, I think I need medium-sized eggs.
Phil: Free-range eggs?
Katrina: Yeah! I think half a dozen will be enough.
Phil: How about these?
Katrina: Perfect! Thanks!
David: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Katrina: I want to make an omelette for tea, so I need eggs.
Phil: The eggs are over here, in this aisle.
Katrina: Hmm, I think I need medium sized eggs.
Phil: Free range eggs?
Katrina: Yeah! I think half a dozen will be enough.
Phil: How about these?
Katrina: Perfect! Thanks!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
David: In this lesson, Katrina went to the supermarket. That’s an important place, I think!
Kellie: Of course you do! I know how you love your food! Supermarkets are very popular in the UK. There used to be smaller grocery stores but these have become less popular, as they are more expensive than supermarkets.
David: Yeah, big supermarkets can use their buying power to get goods cheaper.
Kellie: Exactly. There are several supermarket chains in the UK, but the so-called Big Four are Tesco, ASDA, Sainsbury’s and Morrisons.
David: Are there many supermarkets around?
Kellie: They’re everywhere! Sometimes they’re in easy to reach locations, near housing or in the centre of towns and villages, but some of the larger ones are out of towns.
David: People in the UK shop big, right?
Kellie: Yeah, people usually shop for several days, or even a week or so, at one time and then just get fresh stuff like milk and bread as needed.
David: What foods are popular?
Kellie: The UK loves meat and vegetables, but “foreign” foods such as pasta and rice are popular too. And for those that are either really busy, or really lazy, there is a wide range of ready meals.
David: Ready meals?
Kellie: Frozen meals that you microwave for a few minutes and then voila - dinner is served!
David: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
David: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Kellie: to make [natural native speed]
David: to bring something into existence by creating or changing materials
Kellie: to make[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: to make [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: omelette [natural native speed]
David: a dish made from eggs that is cooked until the eggs set
Kellie: omelette[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: omelette [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: egg [natural native speed]
David: hard-shelled edible thing that is commonly from a chicken
Kellie: egg[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: egg [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: medium [natural native speed]
David: neither large nor small
Kellie: medium[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: medium [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: to need [natural native speed]
David: to be in a state or condition that requires something
Kellie: to need[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: to need [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: dozen [natural native speed]
David: twelve of an item
Kellie: dozen[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: dozen [natural native speed]
David: Next we have..
Kellie: enough [natural native speed]
David: as much or as many as required
Kellie: enough[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: enough [natural native speed]
David: And last we have
Kellie: perfect [natural native speed]
David: fitting well to an existing circumstance or occasion
Kellie: perfect[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kellie: perfect [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
David: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Kellie: be enough
David: meaning "to be adequate", “to be suitable”
David: Let’s break this one down a little.
Kellie: Okay. “Be” is the verb “to be”, which we use for existence. “Enough” means as many as needed, so together they mean that the amount is exactly right.
David: So it’s not too much, and not too little?
Kellie: Yep. It’s just right.
David: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Kellie: Sure. For example, you can say.. I bought some snacks for the meeting but I hope there will be enough.
David: ..which means "I bought some snacks, and I hope that everyone will be able to have one." Okay, what's the next phrase?
Kellie: How about these?
David: meaning "I suggest that these would be good"
David: How is this phrase put together?
Kellie: First there is “how about”, which is a nice and easy phrase to ask if something is suitable for a purpose. “These” is just a generic word for the thing we are asking about.
David: We can switch “these” with “this”, if it is just one thing.
Kellie: That’s right. And we can add the specific name instead, as in “how about these shoes.”
David: So, we use this phrase to give a suggestion.
Kellie: Yeah. It’s pretty informal and can be used for almost anything.
David: Can you give us an example using this word?
Kellie: Sure. For example, you can say.. “How about this blue dress?” Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

David: In this lesson, you'll learn how to describe things using adjectives and numbers.
David: Let’s start with the basics. What’s an adjective?
Kellie: It’s a word that is used to modify a noun or a pronoun. So, words such as “small,” “large,” “fast,” “slow” and also colours are all adjectives.
David: How do we use them to modify nouns?
Kellie: You just put the adjective in front of what you are modifying.
David: It’s that easy?
Kellie: Yes! Let’s try with the noun “book” and the adjective “long”.
David: Adjective goes in front… “long book”
Kellie: That’s right!
David: Let me choose an adjective and noun now… Hm, let’s see. Let’s make a sentence with “I have” and use the noun “cat” and adjective “pink”.
Kellie: “I have a pink cat.” Why did you give me something strange to say?! But, what if I don’t have one cat, but I have seven?
David: You’re a crazy cat lady?
Kellie: I’m trying! You can put the number in front of the noun too, just like we did with adjectives. “I have seven cats.”
David: What if you have so many cats that you can’t count them?
Kellie: In that case, you can use general quantity adjectives. These are words like “a lot of,” “most,” “many,” “few” and “a little.” They give a general idea of how many, but don’t use specific numbers. Again, the word goes before the noun.
David: “I have many cats.”
Kellie: “I have some cats.”
David: In the dialogue, Katrina said she needed half a dozen eggs.
Kellie: Right. There are a few words used to describe specific quantities. A “dozen” is probably the most well known and it means 12, so half a dozen is 6.
David: Eggs are usually sold in dozens, or half dozens, right?
Kellie: That’s right. Other common words are “a couple,” for two, or “trio,” for three.
David: How about several? It sounds a bit like seven, but doesn’t mean seven, does it?
Kellie: No, it doesn’t. That one’s a bit of a grey area. It means more than two, but less than many. You can use that if you don’t want to be too specific but want to show that there aren’t too many.
David: And how about a baker’s dozen?
Kellie: That’s “thirteen.”
David: Okay. Maybe bakers can’t count! (laughs)

Outro

David: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Kellie: Bye.

7 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Listeners! How many lessons in this series are you going to study today?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 03:13 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Luciano,


Thanks for getting in touch and for the great question!


You are right, 'a lot' and 'many' as well as other general quantities are adjectives but words like 'dozen' and 'couple' are nouns representing a number.


This is the same for numbers.


I hope this is helpful to you! 😄


Cheers,

Éva 😎

Team EnglishClass101.com

Luciano
Friday at 03:30 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi.

It's said in the lesson that expressions that mean general quantities (like "a lot", "many", etc.) are adjectives.

Are expressions that mean specific quantities (like "dozen", "a couple", etc.) adjectives too?

And do numbers also have an adjective function, as in "I have seven cats"?

Thank you.

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 02:09 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Abdullah,


Thanks for taking the time to write to us. If you ever need any help throughout your studies here, please feel free to message and we will get back to you asap.


Kindly,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Abdullah
Wednesday at 04:39 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

👍👍

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Sunday at 05:10 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Jean Robert,


"Free-range eggs" are eggs that come from chickens that aren't kept in cages. These chickens can move around fields and have more movement.


Thanks,

Kellie

Team EnglishClass101.com

Jean Robert
Wednesday at 12:15 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello, what does that mean free-range eggs?