Lesson Transcript

Hi, everybody! My name is Alisha.
In this lesson, I'm going to talk about the differences between "have" and "had."
I'm going to look at three very common ways that we use these words.
Let's get started! Okay.
The first way that we use these words is "to express ownership."
So, "ownership," this means when we have like an item that something that belongs to us or when we want to talk about like personalities or personal characteristics. When we want to talk about owning that or something belonging to us, we use "have" or past tense "had" to do that.
So, to make a basic ownership expression with this verb, we use "have" plus our noun phrase. So, for example, a marker is a noun phrase, a marker. So, "I have a marker" is a very simple ownership expression. This is present tense, "have."
When the subject of the sentence is "he, she, or it," we change the verb "have" to "has."
"She has a marker."
"He has a marker."
So, keep in mind, the subject of your sentence will change the way that you have to say the verb or spell the verb, so we follow it with a noun phrase.
When we want to make a past tense statement, we change "have" to "had."
This is true if the subject is "she, he, it," anything. We use "had" for past tense ownership statements.
"So, I had a red marker."
"Now, I have a blue marker," for example.
"I had" in the past, now, "I have," present tense.
So we use "had" and "have" to express past and present ownership of things and characteristics.
Some more examples.
First: "I have a cookie."
"Have," present tense. This shows us right now. The speaker, the speaker has a cookie. The speaker has a cookie. I have a cookie.
Another one, past tense here.
"I had a dog when I was a kid."
So here, "I had a dog whenโ€ฆ," "when I was a kid."
This is my point in time or my period of time. This was the time in which I had a dog, past tense.
Here are some examples where the subject is "he" and "she."
"He has a lot of money."
We use "has" because the subject is "he."
"He has a lot of money."
Finally:
"She has a lot of responsibilities."
Again, the subject is "she" so we use "has" instead of "have."
This is only for the present tense.
"She has a lot of responsibilities."
So, this is the first use of "have" and "had" to express ownership.
Let's move on to point number 2 for this lesson.
Point number 2, "we use have and had to make the perfect tenses."
So we use perfect tense, we can use present perfect tense, past perfect tense, future perfect tense, to talk about actions that started in the past and continued until a certain point in time.
So, when we make "present perfect tense sentences," we use "have" or again, "has," it follows the same rule as over here. If the subject is "she, he, or it," we use "has." So we use "have" or "has," but we follow it with the past participle form of a verb. This is a special form of each verb that we attach to this verb, "have" or "has." So this is to make the present perfect tense.
When we make the "past perfect tense"; however, we use "had" plus the participle form of the verb. So again, there's only one word here. There's no change if the subject changes.
So, past perfect - "had."
Present perfect - "have" or "has."
For more information on these tenses and what they mean, please check our website, EnglishClass101.com or please do a quick search on our YouTube Channel for present perfect tense or past perfect tense videos, for more information about this grammar point.
Let's look at some examples, though, of how we use this to make our statements in perfect tenses.
First:
"I have studied English for 3 years."
So, "have" is used here before "studied." "Studied" is the past participle form of the verb "study." "I have studied English (in this case) for 3 years." The speaker includes a length of time. "I have studied English for 3 years."
Let's change the subject of the sentence.
"She has been waiting for an hour."
So here, we're focusing on a continuing action, but we change "have" to "has" because the subject is "she." We use "been" because "been" is the past participle form of the verb "be." So not "she has be," "she has beenโ€ฆ waiting," she has been waiting. So, this is, again, a present perfect tense expression. Here, we're using it with the continuous form or the progressive form.
Now, let's take a look at some past perfect examples.
"I had just arrived home when the phone rang."
Here, you'll notice, I included "just." So I want to show something happened very quickly after this thing, or rather, I want to show that something happened very quickly, like back to back, so one thing happened, and then another thing happened. I had just arrived home when the phone rang.
So, "had' is used here because this is a past situation. So, I just arrived home, I had just arrived home when the phone rang, so, in the moment after that, very quickly. So I used "just" before the past participle verb "arrived," arrived. So, "arrived" is the past participle form of the verb "arrived." I can use "just" to modify that.
So, another example:
"We had been working all night when we got the news that the project was canceled."
Again, "had" comes before my past participle verb, "be," becomes "been," and I'm using another progressive example, an -ING example.
You'll also notice that with past perfect, we tend to use this when we're telling stories in a sequence. So past perfect thing, the thing that happened far, far, far in the past, we use past perfect tense, and then we use simple past tense. We see this in these two examples. This happened first, "had just arrived home," far in the past, "when the phone rang." So this is my simple past tense statement, "just arrived home," "phone rang," so we understand the sequence of events there by using past perfect, simple past. Same thing here. We had been working all night, continuing to work, we were working all night when we got the news, "we got," simple past tense. We got the news that the project was canceled. So we use these two past forms together to tell stories in sequence. Okay. So again, if you want more information about these grammar points, please do a search of the YouTube channel or the website. Okay.
So, let's move on to our third use of these words for this lesson.
"We use have and had to talk about responsibilities."
This is a very common use of these words. When we talk about present tense responsibilities, we use "have" or "has" again, for "he, she, and it" subjects plus "to" plus a present tense verb. Of course, we can change this with use of "don't." We can make it a negative, "don't have to, doesn't have to," and so on, but making a positive sentence, for the purposes of this lesson, is done in this way.
Same thing with "had." When we're making a past tense responsibility expression, we use "had" plus "to" plus the present tense verb. So this had is the only change, changes from have in the present tense.
So, let's look at some examples.
First: "I have to go to the bank."
"Have to" plus present tense verb. "Go" is my present tense verb.
"I have to go to the bank." Responsibility statement.
If my subject is "he, she, or it," I need to change my verb to "has."
"She has to leave the office."
"Leave" is my simple present tense verb. I've connected it with "to."
"She has to leave the office."
Past tense examples:
"We had to buy new shoes."
So, "we" is the subject, "had" shows it's a past tense expression, "to" connects to "buy," my present tense verb.
"We had to buy new shoes."
Finally:
"He had to find a new job."
So again, my subject is "he," but there's no change to the verb in past tense.
"He had to find a new job."
So, "had to," present tense verb is "find."
"He had to find a new job."
So, we can use "have" and "had" and "has" to talk about explaining our responsibilities.
So, these are three ways that you can use "have" and "had" and "has" as well. So I hope that they helped you in understanding how these words are used. Thank you very much for watching this lesson and I will see you again soon. Bye-bye!

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venky
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yousaf
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Mam, you are so good. I loveโค๏ธ๏ธ your teaching style

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Great teacher!

I love the way that you are explaining.