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Hi, everybody, and welcome back to EnglishClass101.com's youtube channel. My name is Alisha, and today we're going to talk about basic adjectives comparisons. So today I'm going to explain how to make a basic adjective comparison, we'll talk about short adjectives, long adjectives, and some sample question patterns, and some sample statement patterns you can use with this grammar. So, let's get started.
Okay, so first I want to talk about short adjectives.
So short adjectives are adjectives that are one to two syllables long, a syllable is the beat of a word. So, for example, the word small has one beat, small. The word "fast" has one beat, fast. "Pretty" has two syllables, pretty; so a syllable is like the beat of a word. So for short adjectives, adjectives which have one to two syllables, to make the adjectives comparative form, we use the adjective plus ER, this is how we make the adjective form, the comparative form of the adjective. However, please note if the adjective ends in a Y, like pretty, the form is still the same, it's the adjective plus an ER sound, but the spelling does change, so if your adjective ends in a Y, please drop the Y from the end of the adjective and add IER, instead of only ER. This is special, it's only for adjectives which end in Y, so please be careful with spelling. In pronunciation, it doesn't make that big of a difference, but just please note it when you're writing things. Okay, so for example, with the three adjectives I just mentioned, small, fast, and pretty, we just add ER to the end. Small becomes smaller, fast becomes "faster," pretty becomes "prettier" here. So this is how we make the adjective the comparative form of an adjective, a short adjective, one to two syllables.
Okay, let's talk about how to make the comparative form of an adjective with three or more syllables.
So, for a long adjective with three plus syllables, the adjective does not change, the adjective stays the same, however, we have to add more or "less" before the adjective. So for example, with the adjective "beautiful," we can add "more" or "less" in front of the adjective, before the adjective, to make the comparative form. The same thing applies to the adjective "expensive"; so expensive also gets "more" or "less" before the adjective, and this makes the comparative form. So please remember there is no need to change the adjective if the adjective is more than three syllables. If it's fewer than three syllables, please make sure to use this pattern, the short adjective pattern.
However there are a few adjectives which have an irregular form, an irregular comparative form, a few of them are up here on the board. So, some irregular adjectives are "good," "bad," and "fun."
Good does not become good-er or more good. Good in fact changes to "better," so please be careful here. "Good" becomes "better." Bad becomes "worse," we do not use batter or more bad, please use "worse." Bad becomes worse in the comparative form. For "fun," the long adjective rule applies to fun, so please use "more" or "less" in front of the adjective "fun" to make the comparative form.
Okay, so now that we know how to make a comparison, let's talk about a few different patterns that you can use to explain a comparison, to make a comparative statement, or to make a question, to make a question asking someone to compare two or more items.
So, first, to make a positive comparison, we'll say A is plus the comparative adjective, then B.
So for example I could say, let's see... This book is more expensive than that book. I've used the comparative adjective form here, to use a short adjective, I could say, let's see... That shop is smaller than this shop. So just make sure to use the comparative form here.
In the negative comparison, however, you'll see it's slightly different, when you make a negative comparison, you'll say A is not as, plus the regular adjective, there's no change to the adjective in this sentence pattern, as B.
So, for example, A is not as big as B. A is not as expensive as B. So please be careful, when you're making a negative comparison, you're not changing the adjective, the adjective will remain the same, there's no need to update this part, so please be careful here.
Finally, I want to talk about a few questions, so these are a few question patterns that you can use along with your comparatives. So for example, which is, plus your comparative adjective, A or B?
So, for example, which is more expensive A or B? Or, which is bigger, A or B? Here you need to use the comparative form of the adjective in your question.
The same thing here, is A or B, comparative adjective.
So, is A or B bigger? Is A or B more expensive?
You can use both of these patterns to ask simple information questions using the comparative form, so let's try this out in a few example sentences.
Okay. So the first sentence that I have,
My brother is _____ than me.
I want to use the adjective "funny" here. So funny has two syllables, funny, it also ends in Y, so I know I need to apply this rule I just talked about here. So the correct answer is funnier. My brother is funnier than me. This is the correct answer.
Okay! Let's go to this one, Thai food is ______ than French food.
For this one, I want to use the adjective spicy. So spicy, just like funny, ends in Y and it's a short adjective, so again, I need to apply this rule here. So, Thai food is spicier then French food is the right answer for this one.
Okay, next I have, a new house is more, so this is a big hint word for me, more, ______ than a new car.
I want to use the adjective "expensive," I know that expensive is a long adjective, so this is the rule that applies, this means there's no change to the adjective. A new house is more expensive than a new car is the correct sentence here.
Okay, let's go to the next one, French fries are ______ than onion rings.
French fries are what? So I want to use the irregular one, the irregular adjectives "good." French fries are, good becomes better in the adjective comparison form, so French fries are better than onion rings is the example sentence.
Okay, so let's go to next, Batman is ______ than Superman.
Alright! So for this one, I want to use the adjective "exciting," so exciting has three syllables, I know I need to use the long adjective rule here. So, Batman is more exciting than Superman is the correct answer for this one.
Okay! So let's go to the next one, shopping for clothes is not as _____ as shopping for food.
So we learned here there's no change to the adjective when I'm making a negative sentence. So I want to use the adjective "fun" here. Sun therefore does not change in this sentence. So, shopping for clothes is not as fun as shopping for food.
Okay, the final example sentence, listening to music is more _____ than driving a car.
So here, again, I have this hint word, more, so that means that it's probably going to be a long adjective, okay. I want to use the adjective "relaxing" in this sentence. So, more relaxing than driving a car.
Alright! So these are a few examples of ways that you can use the adjective comparative form to make a lot of different sentences, to make positive statements, to make negative statements, and you can try to make a few questions with this grammar as well. Just, if you, if you're not sure which adjective form to use, just think about the number of syllables in the adjective you'd like to apply, and you can try using the rule we talked about on this side of the board.
So I hope that you enjoyed this lesson! Thanks very much for watching, and we'll see you again soon.

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Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Sunday at 09:32 PM
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Hello Cyril,


Thanks for taking the time to ask us your question. ๐Ÿ˜„


The word "more" is used to refer to something greater in amount than something else. It is considered a comparative form. The word "most" is used to refer to something that is the greatest in amount compared to something else. It is considered a superlative form.


Some examples are:

- "I had more to eat than my brother."

- "I ate the most out of everyone."


I hope this is helpful to you. ๐Ÿ˜„๐Ÿ‘


Sincerely,

ร‰va

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Cyril
Monday at 01:23 AM
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Hello,

I saw few exemples on internet, where they used "MOST".

What's the difference between MOST and MORE ?

Why must I choose either MOST, or MORE ?


Exemple :

- The exercise with an asterisk (*) is the most difficult exercise on the worksheet

- He has an interesting hobby, but my sister has the most interesting one in the world.


Thanks

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 08:04 AM
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Hello Shelly,


Thank you very much for your like! We hope you enjoy studying with us.๐Ÿ˜‡

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.


Kind regards,

Levente

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Shelly
Tuesday at 06:22 PM
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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Sunday at 05:28 PM
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Hello Johnny,


Thanks for taking the time to write to us and ask your question. ๐Ÿ˜„


The word 'fun' is a noun meaning 'enjoyment/ pleasure,' it is also a verb meaning 'to joke or tease' and it is an adjective meaning 'entertaining/ amusing.'


The word 'funnier' is an adjective that comes from the word 'funny,' which means 'causing laughter or being humorous.' The word 'funnier' therefore means 'more funny.' For example, "I'm funnier than my brother."


I hope this is helpful to you. ๐Ÿ˜„๐Ÿ‘


Sincerely,

ร‰va

Team EnglishClass101.com

Johnny Lee
Tuesday at 07:30 AM
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Hi,


Thank you for your nice lecture.


For fun, I thought it was noun, not adjective. so the teacher used compatitive form 'funnier' for funny as a answer.

Are there any cases or example sentences using 'more fun' or 'most fun'?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 02:48 PM
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Hello Steven and Ema,


Thanks for taking the time to post and share. ๐Ÿ‘


@Steven - We appreciate this feedback. Some longer adjectives from the lesson are: more beautiful, less expensive, more amazing, less complicated...


I hope this helps. ๐Ÿ˜„๐Ÿ‘


Kindly,

ร‰va

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Ema
Friday at 09:17 PM
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Steven
Thursday at 04:03 AM
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Hi,


I wish Alisha would have given an Adjective comparisons example sentence that has more than three syllables, and uses the word less. For some reason, my brain thinks that using the word less makes a sentence sound negative, therefore, the adjective should not change. Anyone else has this issue? or can help me remove this concept?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 09:35 AM
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Hi there Kevin,


Thanks for your comment and feedback.


If you would like to contact one of our language teachers throughout your studies, I would warmly recommend you use our โ€˜MyTeacherโ€™ feature.


Apart from the quizzes, you could also get a personalised learning plan with regular assignments given and corrected by one of our language teachers.


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