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Lesson Transcript

English Prepositions Made Easy Season 1 Lesson 1 - Talking About the Biggest Sporting Event in the United States
INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to EnglishClass101.com. This is English Prepositions Made Easy Season 1 Lesson 1 - Talking About the Biggest Sporting Event in the United States. John Here.
Becky: Hey I'm Becky.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn the prepositions “at,” “on” and “in”, in relation to time. The conversation takes place at home.
Becky: It's between Kate and Sean.
John: The speakers are friends, so they’ll use informal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Kate: Sean, when is the Super Bowl?
Sean: It's usually in February, but the date changes.
Kate: What date was it in 2015?
Sean: It was on February 1st.
Kate: What time does it usually start?
Sean: It starts at 6.30pm, Eastern time.
Kate: Thank you!
John: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Kate: Sean, when is the Super Bowl?
Sean: It's usually in February, but the date changes.
Kate: What date was it in 2015?
Sean: It was on February 1st.
Kate: What time does it usually start?
Sean: It starts at 6:30pm, Eastern time.
Kate: Thank you!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: In this conversation, Kate was checking the date and time of the Super Bowl.
Becky: Maybe she wants to go next year?
John: Maybe! It’s important to double-check the date and time if you are invited somewhere.
Becky: Yeah, a lot of invitations, especially between friends, are given verbally.
John: So the details might not be written down. I usually only get actual invitations for big events like weddings.
Becky: Me too. So I always double check the date and time. Also, the meeting place.
John: That’s important too! You don’t want to wait in the wrong place.
Becky: I’ve waited in the wrong part of the train station before. It was embarrassing!
John: I can only imagine! What happened?
Becky: Well, I had my smartphone with me, so I double checked the details and then went to the right place.
John: Smartphones make things much easier. If I’m having a party, I make a Facebook event and invite my friends that way.
Becky: That’s really convenient. I often get invites by text or messenger apps.
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Becky: when [natural native speed]
John: a question word used to ask about time
Becky: when[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: when [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: Super Bowl [natural native speed]
John: an annual event that is the championship game in the National Football League (NFL)
Becky: Super Bowl[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: Super Bowl [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: usually [natural native speed]
John: normally, commonly
Becky: usually[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: usually [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: date [natural native speed]
John: a day in the calendar
Becky: date[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: date [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: to change [natural native speed]
John: to alter
Becky: to change[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to change [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: February [natural native speed]
John: the second month of the year
Becky: February[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: February [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: first [natural native speed]
John: ordinal number for "one"
Becky: first[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: first [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: to start [natural native speed]
John: to begin something
Becky: to start[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to start [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: pm [natural native speed]
John: post meridiem - the twelve hour period that is after 12 in the afternoon and before midnight
Becky: pm[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: pm [natural native speed]
John: And last..
Becky: eastern [natural native speed]
John: situated in the east - one of the time zones that is used in America.
Becky: eastern[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: eastern [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Becky: usually
John: meaning "normally,” “commonly"
John: What can you tell us about this?
Becky: This is an adverb of frequency. It tells us how often something happens.
John: We can use “usually” to describe something we do often, but not 100% of the time.
Becky: Yes, it’s more like 90% of the time.
John: How do you use it in a sentence?
Becky: You should put it before the verb, for example “usually plays baseball.”
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “He usually exercises after finishing work.”
John: ...in other words, "He normally exercises after finishing work." Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: first
John: which is the "ordinal number for ‘one.’"
John: What can you tell us about this?
Becky: It’s an ordinal number, so you use it for dates, and for order.
John: So if you win a race, you are first.
Becky: That’s right. Ordinal numbers in English follow a pattern of adding “-th” to the number.
John: Like “fourth,” “eighth,” “thirteenth,” and so on.
Becky: But a few numbers like “one” have special ordinal numbers, so be careful.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “My birthday is on October 1st.”
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Becky: Eastern time
John: which is "a time zone in the US"
John: What can you tell us about this?
Becky: “Eastern” comes from the direction “east,” and means things that are to the east.
John: And “time”?
Becky: “Time” is a measure in hours and minutes. So “Eastern time” means the time zone that the east coast of the US follows.
John: Right, the US is a big country so different parts have different time zones.
Becky: If you see TV shows advertised, you might see different start times listed and that’s why.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “Do you know what time that is in Eastern Time?”
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn how to use the prepositions “at,” “on” and “in,” in relation to time.
John: For this lesson, we will look at three prepositions that are easily confused.
Becky: Yes, they get mixed up all the time. The good news is that their use is pretty simple. You just have to remember it.
John: Remembering is the hard part, though.
Becky: I’m sure you can do it, John!
John: Thank you. The first preposition is “at.”
Becky: We use “at” to talk about time. If we want to say when something will happen and use a time, we need “at.”
John: So we say “at 3 o’clock” or “at 5:30.”
Becky: That’s right. “At” goes before the time.
John: How do we make a sentence using this?
Becky: The usual way is to say what will happen, followed by “at” and the time.
John: “I wake up at 7 o’clock.”
Becky: That’s it. Another example is “The accident occurred at midnight last night and police are looking for witnesses.”
John: That sentence was more difficult, but the grammar was the same - “at midnight.”
Becky: Right. It stays the same, even if the sentence is easy or difficult.
John: Our next preposition is “on.”
Becky: We use “on” for days of the week. “On Monday.” “on Wednesday”… like that.
John: “I didn’t study on Wednesday.”
Becky: Well, your sentence is right but you should study every day!
John: I know, I know. The last preposition for this lesson is “in.”
Becky: We use “in” for months of the year. For example, “in February,” “in December,” for example.
John: “I went to Australia in September.”
Becky: Lucky you! We also use “in” for time periods, such as “in the morning” or “in the evening.”
John: “Although I’m always tired, I always read to my children in the evening.”
Becky: Or “My birthday is in April”.
John: So to sum up, we use “at” for time, “on” for days and “in” for months and time periods.
Becky: Listeners, make sure to check the Lesson Notes PDF for more examples and additional information about the prepositions covered in this lesson.

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Becky: Bye!

22 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners! Try making a sentence using each one of the prepositions we learned on this lesson.

*Post them at the comments.

 

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 04:17 PM
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Hello Michele,


Thanks for taking the time to comment.


It's always great to hear from our students.


Feel free to shoot through any questions you have throughout your studies.


Cheers,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Michele
Wednesday at 02:55 AM
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likeee

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 08:19 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Shafiq,


Thanks for taking the time to comment. 😄


It's always great to hear from our students.


Feel free to shoot through any questions you have throughout your studies.


Cheers,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 11:17 AM
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Hi there Tomihiro,


Great! Thanks for sharing! It's great for us to hear about our students study routines!

😄😄😄


Feel free to shoot through any questions you have throughout your studies.


Cheers,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

TOMIHIRO HIGUMA
Wednesday at 12:02 PM
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I try to study English at 7 o'clock everyday.

But, I will study English at 9 PM on weekends. I always play tennis during day time on weekends.

I will visit NY in September next year.

TOMIHIRO HIGUMA
Wednesday at 11:55 AM
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I understand how to use the prepositions "at", "on" and "in" for time now. Thank you!

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 09:00 PM
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Hello sina,


You are very welcome. 😇

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

We wish you good luck with your language studies.


Kind regards,

Levente

Team EnglishClass101.com

sina
Friday at 05:10 AM
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Thank you for your hard work

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 01:26 PM
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Hello Samuel,


Thanks for getting in contact with us! 👍👍👍


You can say "in the USA" or "at the Eiffel tower" or "in Tokyo."


If you ever have any questions, please let me know.


Cheers,

Eva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Samuel
Sunday at 09:51 PM
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Now I understand better the prepositions, but I understand we can use "in" for example: in the USA, in the other places, we only need to remember in the conditions we need use each ones.