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Lesson Transcript

English Prepositions Made Easy Season 1 Lesson 11 - Losing Your Way in the United States
INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to EnglishClass101.com. This is English Prepositions Made Easy Season 1 Lesson 11 - Losing Your Way in the United States. John Here.
Becky: Hey I'm Becky.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn the prepositions “along” and “through”. The conversation takes place in a car.
Becky: It's between Rachel and Sean.
John: The speakers are co-workers, so they will use both formal and informal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Sean: I'm driving to the second appointment but I'm lost.
Rachel: Where are you?
Sean: I'm driving along the interstate.
Rachel: Go through the tunnel and drive for another few miles.
Sean: Can you check the exit that I need?
Rachel: It's exit 2 for Downtown.
John: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Sean: I'm driving to the second appointment but I'm lost.
Rachel: Where are you?
Sean: I'm driving along the interstate.
Rachel: Go through the tunnel and drive for another few miles.
Sean: Can you check the exit that I need?
Rachel: It's exit 2 for Downtown.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: Sean was driving in this lesson, and it sounds like he was lost.
Becky: I hope he wasn’t calling while driving!
John: I’m sure he wasn’t!
Becky: Driving is very popular in the US. You have to be 16 to drive, but can get a learner’s permit at an earlier age.
John: The age varies from state to state.
Becky: If you are a teenager, you might need to take a Driver’s Ed class, but again this also varies from state to state.
John: America is a huge country, so driving is a necessity in some places.
Becky: Yeah, it’s hard to get around without a car.
John: Cities are connected by highways, and some interstates have toll charges, so you have to pay to use them.
Becky: But long journeys between states and lots of space means that the roads are big and wide.
John: And the cars are big and wide too.
Becky: That’s right. Americans usually drive cars that are bigger than in a lot of other countries.
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Becky: to drive [natural native speed]
John: to travel by car
Becky: to drive[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to drive [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Becky: second [natural native speed]
John: the number 2 item or person in a line-up
Becky: second[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: second [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Becky: appointment [natural native speed]
John: a booking or reservation
Becky: appointment[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: appointment [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Becky: interstate [natural native speed]
John: a network of fast roads that connects cities in the US
Becky: interstate[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: interstate [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Becky: tunnel [natural native speed]
John: a passage that passes through or under things like water or a mountain
Becky: tunnel[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: tunnel [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Becky: another [natural native speed]
John: one in addition
Becky: another[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: another [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Becky: miles [natural native speed]
John: an imperial measure of distance equal to 1.6 kilometers
Becky: miles[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: miles [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Becky: to check [natural native speed]
John: to confirm, to look at
Becky: to check[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to check [natural native speed]
John: And lastly...
Becky: exit [natural native speed]
John: leading road off the highway
Becky: exit[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: exit [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Becky: to drive
John: ...meaning "to travel by car." What can you tell us about this word?
Becky: This is the verb used for operating a car.
John: You can also use it with other vehicles, such as trucks and trains.
Becky: But it shouldn’t be used with two-wheeled vehicles such as bikes. You don’t “drive” bikes, you “ride” bikes.
John: And also you use “fly” for planes and “sail” for boats.
Becky: Wow, so many verbs.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “I hate driving to work every morning.”
John: ...which means "I hate operating a car to get to work every morning." Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: Appointment
John: ...meaning "a booking or reservation." How do you use this word?
Becky: You can use this to describe an arrangement for a meeting, a visit for a service, or when meeting a person.
John: It’s a slightly formal term.
Becky: Yes, you’d use it to describe meeting a person for business, but not meeting a friend for a coffee.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “Hello, I have an appointment with Mr. Synder at 3pm.”
John: .. which means "Hello, I have a previously arranged meeting with Mr. Synder at 3pm.” Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: To check
John: ...meaning "to confirm, to look at." What can you tell us about this word?
Becky: You use this verb when you want to confirm that some information is correct.
John: “Check” can also be a noun.
Becky: That’s right. It can mean an exam or test to confirm the quality or condition of some content.
John: Like a “health check.”
Becky: Or “quality check.”
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “Before we leave, I want to check that I have everything.”
John: ... which means "Before we leave, I want to confirm that I have everything." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about the prepositions “along” and “through”. First up for this lesson, is “along.”
Becky: You can use this as a preposition of movement.
John: You can use it for moving down something that is long and open.
Becky: Such as a road, or line.
John: Let’s hear some examples.
Becky: “We walked along the river.”
John: “There are many stores along the avenue.”
Becky: “The marathon was tough, so he was glad for the many water stations along the route.”
John: Are there any idioms with “along?”
Becky: Yes, there is “along the way.”
John: How do you use this?
Becky: You use this for an action that happens during the time you’re doing something else.
John: For example, “I’ve lived here for 30 years and have made some good friends along the way.”
Becky: That means that during the time of living there, he’s made good friends.
John: Okay, let’s move onto “through.”
Becky: This is also a preposition of movement, but you use it for moving down things that are enclosed.
John: So, it’s things that have walls and a roof, such as a tunnel.
Becky: It can also be used for 3D environments such as a jungle.
John: Let’s hear some examples.
Becky: “The train passed through the tunnel.”
John: “He ran through the rain.”
Becky: In that case, we’re treating rain as a 3D environment as it surrounds you from the sides and above.
John: Any idioms for this?
Becky: Hmm, you can say “through the roof,” to mean something that is at a very high level. It’s often used for things that are too expensive.
John: “I bought this for $10 but now the price is through the roof.”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Becky: Bye

5 Comments

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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners! Try making a sentence using each one of the prepositions we learned on this lesson.

*Post them at the comments.

 

Englishclass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 08:37 PM
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Hi Maksim,


Thank you for your reply. We're glad your doubts were solved ;)


If you have any further questions, please let us know.



Cristiane

Team Englishclass101.com

Maksim
Tuesday at 05:30 PM
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Got it!))

Thanks)

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 11:44 AM
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Hi Maksim,


In your example we do need the preposition so 'It’s exit 2 for Downtown' would be correct.

However, we wouldn't use a preposition in a sentence such as "I'm going Downtown."


Thanks,

Kellie

Team EnglishClass101.com

Maksim
Thursday at 10:00 PM
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Hi)

Do we need use preposition for with the word downtown?

For example: It's exit 2 for Downtown.