Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

English Prepositions Made Easy Season 1 Lesson 14 - Deciding What to Eat at an American Restaurant
INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to EnglishClass101.com. This is English Prepositions Made Easy Season 1 Lesson 14 - Deciding What to Eat at an American Restaurant. John Here.
Becky: Hey I'm Becky.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn the prepositions “from” and “until”. The conversation takes place at a restaurant.
Becky: It's between Kate and Sean.
John: The speakers are friends, so they will use informal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Kate: This restaurant is highly recommended.
Sean: Yes, my friend suggested the lunch buffet.
Kate: Oh, that is served from 11:30.
Sean: But only until 2pm.
Kate: Really? It's 1pm now, we should hurry up and decide.
Sean: The buffet sounds good to me!
John: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Kate: This restaurant is highly recommended.
Sean: Yes, my friend suggested the lunch buffet.
Kate: Oh, that is served from 11:30.
Sean: But only until 2pm.
Kate: Really? It's 1pm now, we should hurry up and decide.
Sean: The buffet sounds good to me!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: A buffet lunch sounds good right now.
Becky: Are you hungry, John?
John: Yeah. After this lesson is finished, we should all go out for dinner. What types of restaurants are there in the US?
Becky: Americans love eating out, so there are many types of restaurants to choose from. It can differ from state to state though.
John: I heard that Mexican food is popular, especially in the states near the Mexican border or with a large number of Mexican immigrants.
Becky: That’s right. I love Mexican food.
John: Me too. Something else I heard about the US is that you have to tip.
Becky: There’s no law, but it’s socially expected of you to tip.
John: How much should we tip?
Becky: Staff in restaurants are often low paid and rely on tips to top up their wages. The typical amount is 15 to 20%.
John: Wow, so much? Do you have to work that out yourself?
Becky: Usually, although some restaurants might do it for you.
John: Right. I’ll take extra cash for the tip then! Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Becky: highly [natural native speed]
John: to a high degree or level
Becky: highly [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: highly [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Becky: to recommend [natural native speed]
John: to endorse, to speak well of, to suggest
Becky: to recommend[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to recommend [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Becky: to suggest [natural native speed]
John: to provide an alternative
Becky: to suggest[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to suggest [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Becky: friend [natural native speed]
John: a person whose company you enjoy
Becky: friend[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: friend [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Becky: lunch [natural native speed]
John: a meal eaten in the middle of the day
Becky: lunch[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: lunch [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Becky: buffet [natural native speed]
John: a style of eating where numerous dishes are offered and can be freely chosen
Becky: buffet[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: buffet [natural native speed]
John: Next we have….
Becky: to serve [natural native speed]
John: to help, to attend to, to work for
Becky: to serve[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to serve [natural native speed]
John: Next we have….
Becky: only [natural native speed]
John: solely, there is nothing else
Becky: only[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: only [natural native speed]
John: And lastly...
Becky: to hurry [natural native speed]
John: to move quickly, to rush something
Becky: to hurry[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to hurry [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Becky: highly
John: ...meaning "to a high degree or level". What can you tell us about this word?
Becky: This comes from the word “high” and is an adverb.
John: How do you use it?
Becky: You can use it to mean particularly well.
John: So, we can say that this restaurant is “highly recommended.”
Becky: Yes. That means that many people recommend it and say that it is really good.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “His new single ranked highly on the charts.”
John: Which means "His new single placed at a high spot in the charts." Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: To recommend
John: ...meaning "to endorse, to speak well of, to suggest." What can you tell us about this word?
Becky: This is a verb, and you will hear it a lot when you’re talking about food.
John: Why is that?
Becky: It’s a good verb to remember when you want a suggestion for what to eat.
John: You can ask the waiter “What do you recommend?”
Becky: There is also a related noun - “recommendation.”
John: Can you give us an example using the verb to recommend?
Becky: For example, you can say, “I recommend the steak.”
John: Which means "I suggest the steak as I think it’s very good." Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: to suggest
John: meaning "to provide an alternative." What can you tell us about this word?
Becky: This is a verb. There’s also a related noun, “suggestion.”
John: How do you use this?
Becky: “To suggest” and “to recommend” can be used in similar ways, but they are different.
John: How are they different?
Becky: With “to recommend,” you’re stating your personal opinion or preference. As in, “You should try this because I think it is good.” But “to suggest” doesn’t mean that you like it, you might just think it’s best for the situation.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “I suggest that we meet at 3pm.”
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about the prepositions “from” and “until”. Let’s start with the preposition “from.”
Becky: You can use “from” in a couple of different ways. We will look at it again in lesson 15.
John: How is it being used in this lesson?
Becky: In this lesson, we’re looking at “from” as a preposition of time.
John: You can use it to talk about when something starts.
Becky: Yes, it usually goes before a time expression, such as “from 10am,” “from Tuesday,” things like that.
John: Okay, let’s look at some example sentences.
Becky: “I am free from 9am.”
John: So, the free time starts at 9am.
Becky: “He will attend the other class from Tuesday.”
John: So, he starts to attend the other class on Tuesday, and will continue to do so after.
Becky: It’s important to remember that we use “from” to emphasize the starting point and can use it for things in the future.
John: “The library will be open from next year.”
Becky: Make sure not to confuse “from” with the preposition “since.” We can’t use “since” this way. “Since” is for things that started in the past and continue on.
John: For example, “The library will be open since next year” is wrong.
Becky: But “the library has been open since last year” is correct.
John: Now, let’s move on to “until”.
Becky: You use “until” to talk about the time something will finish.
John: Again, it’s used with time expressions, so “until 10pm,” or “until Wednesday.”
Becky: An example is “He slept until 9am.”
John: This means he was asleep, and then he woke up at 9am.
Becky: “The mountain is closed until June.”
John: The mountain is closed now, and people won’t be able to visit until June.
Becky: I want to teach an idiom using “until” that can be very sweet.
John: Sweet? What do you mean?
Becky: There is the idiom “until the end of time.” It means “always,” or “forever.” So if you say to someone “I will love you until the end of time...”
John: It means you will love them forever. That is kinda sweet!

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Becky: Bye

1 Comment

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Listeners! Try making a sentence using each one of the prepositions we learned on this lesson.

*Post them at the comments.