Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to EnglishClass101.com. This is English Prepositions Made Easy Season 1 Lesson 16 - Making Plans for a Friday Night in the United States. Eric Here.
Becky: Hey I'm Becky.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn the prepositions “till”, “until” and “past”. The conversation takes place at home.
Becky: It's between Kate and Sean.
Eric: The speakers are friends, so they will use informal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Kate: What time do you finish work on Saturday?
Sean: I have to work until 5 p.m. I can't work past 5 p.m. as the office will close.
Kate: Do you want to meet at the bar past 5th Avenue?
Sean: I might be busy, but I won't know for certain till Thursday.
Kate: Text me when you know.
Sean: Sure.
Eric: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Kate: What time do you finish work on Saturday?
Sean: I have to work until 5pm. I can't work past 5pm as the office will close.
Kate: Do you want to meet at the bar past 5th Avenue?
Sean: I might be busy, but I won't know for certain till Thursday.
Kate: Text me when you know.
Sean: Sure.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Kate and Sean are trying to arrange going out on Saturday.
Becky: It sounded a little difficult though as Sean didn’t know his schedule.
Eric: Yes, Kate asked him to text when he knew.
Becky: Texting is really convenient, isn’t it?
Eric: It is. It’s so easy to send a message to someone. And, you don’t have to worry about whether they are busy at the moment, because they can read it whenever they’re free.
Becky: Cell phones are very popular in the US, especially Androids and the iPhone.
Eric: Is that how people usually contact each other?
Becky: Yeah, the average American sends and receives 32 texts a day! There are messaging apps, but they aren’t as popular as in some other countries.
Eric: Other than Facebook messenger?
Becky: Yeah, Facebook is still popular!
Eric: Do many people have landlines these days?
Becky: I don’t think so. More calls are probably placed via Skype, especially with young people.
Eric: Interesting. Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Becky: to finish [natural native speed]
Eric: to complete, to end
Becky: to finish[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to finish [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: Saturday [natural native speed]
Eric: the day of the week after Friday but before Sunday
Becky: Saturday[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: Saturday [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: to close [natural native speed]
Eric: to shut, for a store to stop service
Becky: to close[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to close [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: busy [natural native speed]
Eric: full of activity, engaged in activity, occupied
Becky: busy[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: busy [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: certain [natural native speed]
Eric: to be sure
Becky: certain[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: certain [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: Thursday [natural native speed]
Eric: the day of the week after Wednesday but before Friday
Becky: Thursday[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: Thursday [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: to text [natural native speed]
Eric: to send an SMS message (not an email) via a mobile phone
Becky: to text[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to text [natural native speed]
Eric: And last...
Becky: when [natural native speed]
Eric: used for time
Becky: when[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: when [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Becky: busy
Eric: ...meaning "full of activity, engaged in activity, occupied." What can you tell us about this word?
Becky: This is an adjective.
Eric: How is it used?
Becky: It can be used to describe a situation when we are occupied. It can also be a convenient excuse...
Eric: What do you mean by that?
Becky: If you’ve been invited somewhere but don’t want to go, you can just say “I’m busy,” and it usually won’t be questioned any further.
Eric: Good to know. Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “I'm really busy this week with all the work I have to do.”
Eric: Which means "I’m occupied and have little free time due to all of the work I have to do."
Eric: Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: Certain
Eric: meaning "to be sure." What can you tell us about this word, Becky?
Becky: This is another adjective.
Eric: How do you use it?
Becky: It’s similar to “sure,” and you can use it to say that you are sure of something. You often hear it in sentences starting “I’m certain that…”
Eric: Is it a formal or informal word?
Becky: It can be both. In informal situations, you can also use “sure.”
Eric: Can you give us an example using “certain”?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “I'm certain that I've read this book before.”
Eric: Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: To text
Eric: meaning "to send a message via a cell phone."
Becky: We heard this word in the conversation and spoke about it earlier too.
Eric: Right, it’s a verb you use for cell phone communication.
Becky: It can also be a noun, as the message we receive or send is called a text message.
Eric: So Sean will text Kate a text?
Becky: Well, you’re technically correct, but an American would never say this sentence. We would say “Sean will text Kate” or “Sean will send Kate a text.” The only thing we text are texts, so “text a text” sounds strange. Wow, that was a tongue twister.
Eric: (laughs) Well can you give us one last example using “text”?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “I'll text you when I get home.”
Eric: Which means "I’ll send you a message via cell phone when I get home." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you'll learn about the prepositions “until”, “till” and “past”. We have three to discuss in this lesson, so let’s jump right in. Our first preposition is “until.”
Becky: This is a preposition of time. It is used to say an action is occurring up to the time or place specified.
Eric: Can it only be used for time or place?
Becky: Yes, but you can’t use it for distance.
Eric: Let’s hear an example.
Becky: “I will study until 9pm.”
Eric: This means that she will study, and continue studying. She will stop studying when it is 9pm.
Becky: Another example is “Don’t open your present until your birthday!”
Eric: The person might have their present already, but they shouldn’t open it before their birthday.
Becky: I’ll give you one more sentence. “The bus won’t stop until New York.”
Eric: Wait, I thought you said this couldn’t be used for distance?
Becky: It can’t. That sentence isn’t talking about the distance to New York, it’s talking about the action of arriving in New York.
Eric: It’s the same as saying “The bus won’t stop until it arrives in New York.”
Becky: Yes. Just quicker!
Eric: Next is “till.”
Becky: We can cover this one quickly. It means exactly the same as “until,” only it is less formal. Sometimes you’ll hear it in formal poetry, however.
Eric: This is when the poet wants to keep the rhythm, right?
Becky: Exactly.
Eric: The final preposition is “past.”
Becky: We use this as a preposition of time to mean after the time, or after a place.
Eric: Can you give us an example?
Becky: “Don’t stay up past midnight!”
Eric: This means go to bed by midnight; don’t still be awake after midnight.
Becky: Or “He drove past the store.”
Eric: He didn’t stop at the store; he kept on driving further.
Becky: Listeners, don’t forget to check the Lesson Notes PDF to reinforce what you just learned.

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Becky: Bye.

5 Comments

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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners! Try making a sentence using each one of the prepositions we learned on this lesson.

*Post them at the comments.

 

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 08:52 PM
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Hello Sergei,


Thanks for taking the time to comment.


Feel free to shoot through any questions you have throughout your studies.


Cheers,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Sergei
Friday at 03:46 PM
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Thanks. With this lesson English becomes more understandable. So, can I say for example: "I was having to past this shop during commuting, I couldn't help but go into it"? Best

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 12:27 PM
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Hi Mây,


In this case "past" means "after." If you go to 5th Avenue and keep walking, you'll see the bar.


Hope that helps!

Kellie

Team EnglishClass101.com

Mây
Thursday at 03:06 AM
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What is meaning of "past" in "Do you want to meet at the bar past 5th Avenue?" ?