Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to EnglishClass101.com. This is English Prepositions Made Easy Season 1 Lesson 17 - Make Sure You Don't Miss Any Important American Meetings! Eric Here.
Becky: Hey I'm Becky.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn the prepositions “behind” and “beyond”. The conversation takes place at work.
Becky: It's between Rachel and Sean.
Eric: The speakers are co-workers, and they will use both formal and informal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Rachel: Have you seen the updated meeting calendar for this year?
Sean: No, I haven't.
Rachel: The old calendar doesn't go beyond April, but I need to attend my daughter's graduation in June.
Sean: Hopefully there aren't any important meetings that day.
Rachel: I hope not!
Sean: Maybe Mr. Anderson has a copy on his desk. Check behind his PC monitor.
Eric: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Rachel: Have you seen the updated meeting calendar for this year?
Sean: No, I haven't.
Rachel: The old calendar doesn't go beyond April, but I need to attend my daughter's graduation in June.
Sean: Hopefully there aren't any important meetings that day.
Rachel: I hope not!
Sean: Maybe Mr. Anderson has a copy on his desk. Check behind his PC monitor.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: I hope Rachel can attend the graduation ceremony.
Becky: Me too! That’s such an important day for students.
Eric: What is the school system like in America? When do children generally start school?
Becky: Most kids start around five or six years old by going to kindergarten, although some start older.
Eric: After kindergarten is elementary school, right?
Becky: Yes. Children usually spend five years there before going to middle school, or junior high school.
Eric: And then high school starts in 9th grade and goes until 12th grade.
Becky: Each year in high school has a special name. The first year, for children aged 14 to 15, is called freshmen year.
The second year, for children aged 15 to 16, is called sophomore year.
Then it’s junior year, and finally senior year for 17 to 18 year olds. Education after that is optional.
Eric: What about graduation ceremonies?
Becky: At the end of senior year, if your grades are high enough, you graduate high school and receive a high school diploma.
Eric: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Becky: to update [natural native speed]
Eric: to bring up to date, to make current
Becky: to update[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to update [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: calendar [natural native speed]
Eric: a system for dividing the parts of a year, or a chart that shows these divisions
Becky: calendar[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: calendar [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: April [natural native speed]
Eric: a month of the year after March but before May
Becky: April[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: April [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: to need [natural native speed]
Eric: to be in a state or condition that requires something
Becky: to need[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to need [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: daughter [natural native speed]
Eric: a female child
Becky: daughter[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: daughter [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: graduation [natural native speed]
Eric: to receive a diploma or degree upon completing school
Becky: graduation[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: graduation [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: hopefully [natural native speed]
Eric: in a hopeful, expectant way
Becky: hopefully[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: hopefully [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: important [natural native speed]
Eric: of great significance
Becky: important[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: important [natural native speed]
Eric: And lastly...
Becky: to check [natural native speed]
Eric: to confirm, to look at
Becky: to check[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to check [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Becky: to update
Eric: ...meaning "to bring up to date; to make current." What can you tell us about this word?
Becky: This is a verb. It’s often used to say that things such as documents or news have been brought up to date.
Eric: You also hear it a lot with computers and technology.
Becky: That’s right. If you install a new version of some software, you have “updated” the program.
Eric: There is also a noun “update.”
Becky: We can also say that something is “up to date,” or the act of bringing something up to date.
Eric: Can you give us another example using “update” as a verb?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “The computer updated overnight.”
Eric: Which means "The computer upgraded to the latest version overnight." Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: Daughter
Eric: meaning "a female child." What can you tell us about this word?
Becky: This is a noun. If you have a child and it is a girl, then she is your daughter.
Eric: If the child is a boy, then he is your son.
Becky: There is also “step-daughter” - this is a child that isn’t your blood relative, but is the daughter of your partner.
Eric: And a “daughter-in-law” is a girl that is married to your child.
Becky: And finally, a “granddaughter” is the daughter of one of your children.
Eric: Can you give us an example using the word daughter?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “He has three daughters.”
Eric: Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: Important
Eric: meaning "of great significance." How do you use this word?
Becky: This is an adjective. You can use it to describe something of great value, or something that you think has great value.
Eric: It’s easy to say that something isn’t of importance.
Becky: Just add “un-” to the start. “Unimportant.”
Eric: A common phrase that uses “important” is VIP.
Becky: This stands for “very important person.”
Eric: Can you give us an example using “important”?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “It is very important that this work is finished today.”
Eric: Which means "It is essential and of great significance that this work is finished today." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you'll learn about the prepositions “behind” and “beyond”. Just two new propositions for this lesson.
Becky: Yes, but they’re important ones!
Eric: In that case, let’s get started. The first preposition is “behind.”
Becky: This is a preposition of place. It’s used to say that something is at the back of something else.
Eric: Can you give us an example?
Becky: “The pen is behind the TV.”
Eric: Imagine there is a TV. At the back of the TV is a pen.
Becky: You probably wouldn’t be able to see the pen if it was behind the TV.
Eric: Probably not! TVs are much bigger than pens. Can we have another example?
Becky: “The library is behind the supermarket.”
Eric: At the back of the supermarket is the library.
Becky: Note the sentence structure - the thing that is furthest back, comes first.
Eric: We can also use “behind” to say that things are running later than expected.
Becky: Yes. We can say “The train is running behind schedule.”
Eric: So there is a schedule, but the train is late - it is behind the time on the schedule.
Becky: You can also use “behind” for showing support. For example, “The entire town was behind the football team.”
Eric: This means the entire town was supporting the football team. The next preposition is “beyond.”
Becky: This is another preposition of place. It’s very similar to “past,” which we learned in a previous lesson.
Eric: So, how do you use “beyond”?
Becky: You can use it to say that an action has gone past a certain point. This is more formal than “past,” though.
Eric: Can you give us an example?
Becky: “The party went beyond midnight.”
Eric: The party kept going past midnight and didn’t stop.
Becky: “I thought that I could manage this new job, but it is beyond my ability level.”
Eric: My ability level is, for example, intermediate level. But this new job needs someone who is at an advanced level. So, it’s past my level.

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time!
Becky: Bye

1 Comment

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Listeners! Try making a sentence using each one of the prepositions we learned on this lesson.

*Post them at the comments.