Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to EnglishClass101.com. This is English Prepositions Made Easy Season 1 Lesson 18 - Changing Your American Insurance Plan. Eric Here.
Becky: Hey I'm Becky.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn the prepositions “concerning” and “regarding.” The conversation takes place at work.
Becky: It's between a female customer and Sean.
Eric: The speakers are strangers, so they will use formal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Sean: Hello, Kennedy's insurance, how may I be of assistance to you?
customer: I have a question concerning my new insurance plan.
Sean: What is your question regarding?
customer: It's about my payment dates. Can I change the date?
Sean: Of course. Do you want to continue weekly payments or monthly payments?
customer: Can I change to monthly payments?
Sean: We will send you a letter regarding this change through the mail. Have a nice day!
Eric: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Sean: Hello, Kennedy's insurance, how may I be of assistance to you?
customer: I have a question concerning my new insurance plan.
Sean: What is your question regarding?
customer: It's about my payment dates. Can I change the date?
Sean: Of course. Do you want to continue weekly payments or monthly payments?
customer: Can I change to monthly payments?
Sean: We will send you a letter regarding this change through the mail. Have a nice day!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: In this conversation, we got to see Sean at work.
Becky: Yes, it seems that he has a customer service job for an insurance company.
Eric: Customer service… What is that like in the US?
Becky: It’s very important. If you work in customer service, you’re expected to be polite and cheerful at all times.
Eric: I think the US has an international reputation for cheerful customer service.
Becky: Really? That’s good to hear. Customer service is tough work.
Eric: Yeah, I guess that being helpful and happy all of the time despite external factors must be tough.
Becky: Yeah, and many customer service positions aren't well paid.
Eric: Right, we spoke in an earlier lesson about restaurant staff being underpaid and relying on tips.
Becky: You should also tip other people that work in customer service, such as taxi drivers and bellboys at hotels.
Eric: Wow, service with a smile is expensive. Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Becky: insurance [natural native speed]
Eric: agreement where a person makes payments to a company, for a promise that the company will pay money in the case of injury or incident agreed upon
Becky: insurance[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: insurance [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: assistance [natural native speed]
Eric: to help somebody by sharing work or doing work for them
Becky: assistance[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: assistance [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: question [natural native speed]
Eric: a sentence worded to ask for information
Becky: question[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: question [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: payment [natural native speed]
Eric: money that is owed to cover a bill or service
Becky: payment[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: payment [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: date [natural native speed]
Eric: a day in the calendar
Becky: date[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: date [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: weekly [natural native speed]
Eric: to occur once every seven days
Becky: weekly[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: weekly [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: monthly [natural native speed]
Eric: to occur once every month
Becky: monthly[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: monthly [natural native speed]
Eric: And last...
Becky: mail [natural native speed]
Eric: material sent by air, land, or sea using the postal system
Becky: mail[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: mail [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Becky: question
Eric: ...meaning "a sentence worded to ask for information." What can you tell us about this word?
Becky: It’s easy to make and identify question sentences in English.
Eric: What should we look out for?
Becky: Question words - these are “what”, “where”, “when”, “who”, “how” and “why.”
Eric: Also in writing, you’ll see a question mark.
Becky: When speaking, sometimes questions don’t have question words. You can tell these by the rising intonation at the end. For example, “You going home?”
Eric: Can you give us an example using the word question?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “Can I ask you a question?”
Eric: ...which means "Can I ask you something to find out some information?" And this sentence is a question!
Becky: Right! Did you hear the rising intonation?
Eric: Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: Date
Eric: meaning "a day in the calendar." What can you tell us about this word?
Becky: A “date” is a specific day, usually identified by month and day.
Eric: Here’s a common question you might ask if you don’t know what day it is: “What’s today’s date?”
Becky: You can also use the word “date” in a completely different way.
Eric: Ah, as in, a romantic night out with a partner.
Becky: Yes. “I have a date tonight,” for example.
Eric: Can you give us another example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “What was the date last Tuesday?”
Eric: Which means "What month and day was it last Tuesday?" Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: Weekly
Eric: meaning "to occur once every seven days." Where does this word come from?
Becky: This comes from the word “week,” and means that something happens once a week.
Eric: We can also say “monthly” for once a month.
Becky: Or “yearly” for once a year.
Eric: If something happens twice in a seven day period...
Becky: You’d say “twice a week.” You can also say “twice weekly.”
Eric: Can you give us an example using weekly?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “I pay my rent weekly.”
Eric: Which means "I pay my rent every seven days." That’s not very common in the States, is it Becky?
Becky: Nope. We usually pay monthly.
Eric: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you'll learn about the prepositions “concerning” and “regarding.” These two prepositions are a little different from the ones we’ve discussed so far.
Becky: That’s right. These have nothing to do with time or position.
Eric: Well, let’s find out more about them! First up is “concerning.”
Becky: When you use it as a preposition, the meaning of “concerning” is very similar to “about.”
Eric: You use it to highlight the topic you want to talk about, or ask a question about it.
Becky: It’s more formal than “about,” though.
Eric: That’s why Sean used it in the conversation.
Becky: Yes, it’s more polite and professional. “About” isn’t an impolite word at all, but in formal English “concerning” sounds better.
Eric: Let’s hear some examples.
Becky: “I had a phone call from school concerning my son.”
Eric: The school called me, as they wanted to talk about my son. The son was the topic.
Becky: “All reports concerning cheating are dealt with by the principal.”
Eric: Any reports of students cheating go to the principal. Here, it’s being used to say what the topic of the report is. Let’s move onto “regarding.”
Becky: “Regarding” is very similar to “concerning” and “about.”
Eric: Most of the time, you can use it in the same situation as “concerning.”
Becky: It’s also formal English.
Eric: Can you give us an example?
Becky: “I have many problems regarding your proposal.”
Eric: I have problems, and the topic of my problems is your proposal.
Becky: One big difference and something to be aware of, is that “concerning” can also be an adjective.
Eric: Yes, it means the same as “worrying.”
Becky: “This is a concerning situation,” for example. “Regarding” is not an adjective and in this case, it cannot be used to replace “concerning.”
Eric: Also, you can say “with regards to” or “in regards to” instead of “regarding.”
Becky: But you can’t say “with concerns to” or “in concerns to.”
Eric: Make sure to keep this in mind!

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time!
Becky: Bye!

7 Comments

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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners! Try making a sentence using each one of the prepositions we learned on this lesson.

*Post them at the comments.

 

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 07:15 AM
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Hello Francisco,


Thanks for the great feedback!!


Both have been used as a closing message for letters, messages and emails. They are a professional way to close. "Kind regards" tends to be a more formal variation of "Best regards."


If you ever have any questions, please feel free to shoot them through here. 😉


Kindly,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Francisco
Friday at 10:39 PM
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Hello

Very interesting lesson. What can you tell me regarding the formal phrase: "Best regards" or "Kind regards" ?

EnglishClass101.com
Wednesday at 09:00 PM
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Hi Svetlana,


That's great!👍


Keep up using the [Word Bank] feature on your studies! 👍


Feel free to let us know if you have any questions.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team EnglishClass101.com

Svetlana
Wednesday at 08:43 PM
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Hi Cristiane,

I added my words :-)

Thank you for the answer.


Sincelery,

Svetlana

EnglishClass101.com
Tuesday at 11:34 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Svetlana,


Thank you for posting.


Please check out our English Dictionary:

https://www.englishclass101.com/english-dictionary/


You can add any vocabulary available in our English Dictionary to your [My Word Bank] by selecting the desired entries and clicking on [Add Selected Words to Word bank].


Hope this helps! If you have any questions, please let us know.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team EnglishClass101.com

Svetlana
Tuesday at 10:54 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Teachers,

I have one question.

Why I can't add prepositions (concerning,regarding......) and some more words in words bank?

I'd like to listen these words on the phone,but this option doesn't exist....or I didn't see it.

Thank you in advance for the answer .