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Lesson Transcript

English Prepositions Made Easy Season 1 Lesson 2 - Going to a Conference in the United States
INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to EnglishClass101.com. This is English Prepositions Made Easy Season 1 Lesson 2 - Going to a Conference in the United States. John Here.
Becky: Hey I'm Becky.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use the prepositions “at”, “on” and “in”, in relation to place. The conversation takes place in the office.
Becky: It's between Sean and Rachel.
John: The speakers are co-workers, so they will use informal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Sean: The national conference is tomorrow.
Rachel: Yes, it will be held in New York.
Sean: Do you know where?
Rachel: It's at the Sheraton Hotel.
Sean: The Sheraton on 7th Avenue?
Rachel: Yes, that's it. Have you been there before?
Sean: I stayed there on vacation once.
John: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Sean: The national conference is tomorrow.
Rachel: Yes, it will be held in New York.
Sean: Do you know where?
Rachel: It's at the Sheraton Hotel.
Sean: The Sheraton on 7th Avenue?
Rachel: Yes, that's it. Have you been there before?
Sean: I stayed there on vacation once.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: Sean and Rachel have a conference to attend.
Becky: Yeah, sounds like it will be a work conference.
John: At least it’s in a good hotel.
Becky: Right! I have friends that are always traveling for work conferences.
John: Yeah, I guess that some people have to go to a lot of conferences for their jobs. It’s a good place to find out more information or new ways of working.
Becky: You can also meet people from other companies and do some networking.
John: That’s especially true if it’s a national conference and people travel from all over the country. The company might even pay for your hotel stay.
Becky: Those are the best conferences! Nice hotel, free food...
John: You make it sound like conferences are awesome.
Becky: They can be, but sometimes you have to do some research before.
John: Yeah, sometimes you have information to read through or may even have to give a talk.
Becky: Those are the worst conferences!
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Becky: national [natural native speed]
John: relating to an entire country
Becky: national[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: national [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: tomorrow [natural native speed]
John: the day after today
Becky: tomorrow[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: tomorrow [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: to hold [natural native speed]
John: to arrange and take part in a meeting or event
Becky: to hold[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to hold [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: to know [natural native speed]
John: to be aware of something
Becky: to know[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to know [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: hotel [natural native speed]
John: a place to stay while on vacation
Becky: hotel[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: hotel [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: avenue [natural native speed]
John: a road or street in a town
Becky: avenue[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: avenue [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: before [natural native speed]
John: the time preceding
Becky: before[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: before [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: to stay [natural native speed]
John: to visit, to remain somewhere
Becky: to stay[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to stay [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: vacation [natural native speed]
John: leisure trip, trip taken only for enjoyment
Becky: vacation[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: vacation [natural native speed]
John: And last..
Becky: once [natural native speed]
John: one time
Becky: once[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: once [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Becky: national...
John: meaning "relating to an entire country."
John: What can you tell us about this?
Becky: It’s an adjective you use to describe something that is common to an entire country.
John: I often hear it used in sports.
Becky: That’s right. If there is a sporting event that involves teams or athletes from all over the US, it will be a national championship.
John: But it isn’t only used for the United States, right?
Becky: No. A national championship in Canada, for example, would have teams and athletes from all over Canada taking part.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “He will be delivering a speech at the national conference next week.”
John: Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: To hold...
John: meaning "to arrange and take part in a meeting or event."
John: What can you tell us about this?
Becky: You can use this verb to talk about organizing an event or party. So if we say “John is holding a party”...
John: ...it means that John is organizing the party.
Becky: You can use “to hold” in both informal and formal language, but there are some other verbs you can use informally. Actually, you probably use these verbs more often than “hold.”
John: What verbs are these?
Becky: You can say “throw a party” or “have a party.” “Hold” is used for more formal events.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say.. The company is holding a conference next week.
John: .. which means "the company is organizing a conference for next week". Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about the prepositions “at”, “on” and “in,” in relation to place. We looked at these prepositions in lesson one, but when talking about time.
Becky: Right. We learned that you use “at” for time, “on” for days and “in” for months and periods of time.
John: But these three prepositions can also be used for place and location. I’m not sure if that’s convenient or confusing.
Becky: Hopefully convenient!
John: Let’s start by looking at “in.”
Becky: You can use “in” for enclosed spaces, such as a room, and also countries. “In” goes before the place and sometimes we need an article.
John: So we would say “in the bedroom” or “in France.”
Becky: An example sentence is “He always sings in the car.”
John: I’ll give another example: “I thought that I put my credit card in my wallet before I left home, but it isn’t there.”
Becky: Yeah, things such as a box, wallet, or bag are also enclosed spaces, so they need “in.”
John: Next, we’ll look at “at.”
Becky: We use “at” for a physical point. So if you’re talking about meeting “at the post office,” it would mean that the post office is the meeting point. But that doesn’t necessarily mean inside the post office.
John: If it was inside, we’d say “in the post office.”
Becky: That’s right. We can say “There isn’t an ATM at the train station...”
John: Sometimes people may use “in” instead of “at.” This is because they are talking about being inside of the train station building. But if you stick to this rule and use “at”, you won’t be wrong.
Becky: There is one big exception that we need to point out though. We never say “in home,” it’s always “at home.”
John: Right. “He’s studying in home” sounds weird. We say “he’s studying at home.”
Becky: Don’t forget that one!
John: Finally for this lesson, is “on.”
Becky: We use “on” for surfaces, such as “on the table” or “on the wall.”
John: For example, “The book is on the table.” or “Are there any vegetarian dishes on the menu?”
Becky: There is a big exception to this one too, that often tricks people.
John: I think I know what you mean...
Becky: If you are on public transport, like a bus or a train, you use “on.” For example, “On the bus, on the train…”
John: You might think that it should be “in”, as it’s an enclosed space, but no, use “on!”
Becky: We also use “on” for riding animals and bikes.

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Becky: Bye!

55 Comments

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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners! Try making a sentence using each one of the prepositions we learned on this lesson.

*Post them at the comments.

 

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Sunday at 08:02 PM
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Hello MO,


You're very welcome. Thanks for joining us!


We hope you’re enjoying studying English with us.


If you ever have any questions, please feel free to shoot them through here. 😉


Kindly,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

MO
Saturday at 10:24 AM
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thanks very much for preposition lesson . that was my big problem 👍👍😄😄

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 08:50 AM
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Hello Yen,


Thanks for taking the time to ask us your question. 👍


The phrase "will be held..." is written in a 'simple future passive tense' (something that is to be done by someone in the future). To form the affirmative form of simple future passive you need to have - object + will + be + verb3 (past participle). To form a question in simple future passive you need to have - will + object + be + verb3 (past participle).


I hope this is helpful to you. 😄👍


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Yen
Tuesday at 06:39 PM
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Hi there,


Could you guys help me explain the phrase: "It will be held in New York". "Held" is the past of "hold" why we used "held" in the future?

Thank you.


Yen

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 03:24 PM
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Hello Aldy,


Thanks for sharing your sentences. 😄


Feel free to ask us any questions that come up.


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Aldy
Friday at 12:48 AM
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Hi, teacher

Here are my sentences:


1- I saw my cousing on the bus

2- Michael bought his coat in London

3- Do you study at the University?


Thanks

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:15 AM
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Hello Lakhdar,


Thank you for your comment. 😇

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

We wish you good luck with your language studies.


Kind regards,

Levente

Team EnglishClass101.com

Lakhdar
Wednesday at 05:04 PM
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Hello teacher,

Here are my three sentences.

1. I live in a small town in Algeria.

2. All my friends at school are sweet.

3. The story ending is on page 15.

Thanks.

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 10:51 AM
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Hello Evan,


Thanks for taking the time to write and ask your question.


An article is used together with a noun. There are only three articles: the, a, an.


A proposition is a word or phrase used before a noun, pronoun, to show direction, place, time, or location. Some are: in, at, on, of, to. Therefore in the lesson notes, when it said "the preposition 'in' should go before the point (the noun). The article is needed with the noun to refer to the noun (to identify it).


I hope this is helpful to you and you can understand this better.


Please feel free to ask us any other questions you have throughout your studies.


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Evan
Tuesday at 11:57 AM
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Hello teacher. I'm reading the Lesson Notes. There is "The prepositions 'in' should go before the point, – 'in the bedroom.' The point often needs an article, but not with proper nouns such as countries." I can understand the 'point' such as bedroom or New York or US, but I can't understand why point needs an article. I can't understand here the meaning of 'article'. Can you help me to explain this?