Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to EnglishClass101.com. This is English Prepositions Made Easy Season 1 Lesson 20 - Getting Invited to a Thanksgiving Dinner in the United States. Eric Here.
Becky: Hey I'm Becky.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn the prepositions “on” and “off”. The conversation takes place at home.
Becky: It's between Kate and Sean.
Eric: The speakers are friends, so they will use informal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Sean: Hey Kate, thanks for inviting me to your Thanksgiving dinner.
Kate: Thanks for coming early to help me. Can you put the cranberry sauce on the table?
Sean: Should I leave those candles on the table?
Kate: Can you take them off the table?
Sean: Sure. I'll switch the TV off, too.
Kate: No, leave the TV on. I want to watch the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade
Eric: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Sean: Hey Kate, thanks for inviting me to your Thanksgiving dinner.
Kate: Thanks for coming early to help me. Can you put the cranberry sauce on the table?
Sean: Should I leave those candles on the table?
Kate: Can you take them off the table?
Sean: Sure. I'll switch the TV off, too.
Kate: No, leave the TV on. I want to watch the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Oh, Thanksgiving dinner! That’s an important date on the calendar for any American.
Becky: It is. Thanksgiving is celebrated on the fourth Thursday of November every year.
Eric: So the date always changes, but it’s always a Thursday.
Becky: The first Thanksgiving is said to have been celebrated by the Pilgrims in the 17th century as part of a harvest celebration.
Eric: What is a 21st century Thanksgiving like?
Becky: It’s an important family day.
Eric: Yes, families gather together to give thanks.
Becky: And eat lots of food.
Eric: And sometimes argue.
Becky: Families do that sometimes! There is a traditional Thanksgiving meal that is centered around turkey and all of the trimmings.
Eric: There’s so much food… I like Thanksgiving because I love to watch the football games that day.
Becky: Yeah? I like watching the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade!
Eric: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Becky: to invite [natural native speed]
Eric: to ask someone to attend
Becky: to invite[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to invite [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: dinner [natural native speed]
Eric: the final meal of the day, the meal after lunch
Becky: dinner[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: dinner [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: sauce [natural native speed]
Eric: a liquid served with food to add flavor or moisture
Becky: sauce[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: sauce [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: candle [natural native speed]
Eric: an object made of wax with a wick in the middle that can be lit to provide light
Becky: candle[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: candle [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: to switch [natural native speed]
Eric: to change, to shift
Becky: to switch[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to switch [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: table [natural native speed]
Eric: an item of furniture with a flat surface that objects can be placed upon
Becky: table[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: table [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have….
Becky: TV [natural native speed]
Eric: an appliance that can receive broadcast signals
Becky: TV[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: TV [natural native speed]
Eric: And last...
Becky: parade [natural native speed]
Eric: a moving line of people and displays called floats in celebration of a holiday or other important event
Becky: parade[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: parade [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Becky: to invite
Eric: ...meaning "to ask someone to attend." What can you tell us about this word?
Becky: This is a verb that you can use to politely ask someone to attend a party or event.
Eric: If you’re being polite and formal, you might give people a card or letter with the details.
Becky: Yes, this is called an “invite” or an “invitation.”
Eric: If someone comes but hasn’t been invited, you can say that they are “an uninvited guest.”
Becky: In fact, you can use that in any situation when someone you don’t want arrives.
Eric: Can you give us an example using the verb invite?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “Have you been invited to the office party?”
Eric: Which means "Have you been asked to come to the office party?"
Eric: Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: To switch
Eric: meaning "to change, to shift." What can you tell us about this word?
Becky: This is a verb that conjugates in a regular way.
Eric: When do you use it?
Becky: You often use it when talking about electrical objects. To “switch on” and to “switch off.”
Eric: Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “Switch off the lights before you leave the room.”
Eric: Which means "Turn off the lights before you leave the room." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you'll learn about the prepositions “on” and “off”. The two prepositions in this lesson are quite closely linked, so let’s look at them in detail.
Becky: Yeah. We’ve looked at the preposition “on” a couple of times.
Eric: Yes, in lesson one in relation to time, and in lesson two in relation to place and position.
Becky: This time, we’ll look at it again for position.
Eric: So how do you use it for position?
Becky: You use it for surfaces. It is often teamed with verbs such as “to put.”
Eric: Can you give us an example?
Becky: Sure. “I put it on the desk.”
Eric: Where did you put it? Look at the desk!
Becky: “The clock is on the wall.”
Eric: Where is the clock? Look at the wall!
Becky: Another example is “I can’t go to bed yet, because my dog is sleeping on my bed.”
Eric: On top of the bed, is the dog.
Becky: Yeah, we don’t want to disturb the dog! Like the expression says, let sleeping dogs lie.
Eric: What does that mean?
Becky: It means don’t start trouble; let things stay the way they are.
Eric: Okay, the next preposition is “off.”
Becky: “Off” is also a preposition of position. It’s used to say that an object has moved away or down from something.
Eric: It’s often used with verbs like “to fall” or “to take.”
Becky: It has the opposite meaning to “on” sometimes. As in, “I put the pen on the table.” or “I took the pen off the table.”
Eric: They are opposite actions. Okay, let’s hear some examples for “off.”
Becky: “I fell off the ladder.”
Eric: I was on the ladder, but I fell.
Becky: “You should pick up your dog and take him off the bed.”
Eric: Ah, earlier you said you couldn’t go to bed because the dog was on the bed.
Becky: Yes, a solution is to pick up the dog and take him off.
Eric: So I guess you shouldn’t let all sleeping dogs lie.

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time!
Becky: Bye.

1 Comment

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Listeners! Try making a sentence using each one of the prepositions we learned on this lesson.
*Post them at the comments.