Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to EnglishClass101.com This is English Prepositions Made Easy Season 1 Lesson 21 - Do These American Brothers Look Alike? Eric Here.
Becky: Hey I'm Becky.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn the prepositions “like” and “unlike”. The conversation takes place at home.
Becky: It's between Kate and Sean.
Eric: The speakers are friends, so they will use informal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Kate: I met Sam's younger brother yesterday. He looks like Sam.
Sean: Really? Sam doesn't look like his older brother at all.
Kate: I think they are similar. Sam's hair is different to his older brother now though, unlike before.
Sean: That's true. And unlike some other brothers, you never see them together.
Kate: I think they had an argument a few years ago.
Sean: That sounds like Sam!
Eric: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Kate: I met Sam's younger brother yesterday. He looks like Sam.
Sean: Really? Sam doesn't look like his older brother at all.
Kate: I think they are similar. Sam's hair is different to his older brother now though, unlike before.
Sean: That's true. And unlike some other brothers, you never see them together.
Kate: I think they had an argument a few years ago.
Sean: That sounds like Sam!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Family is important to Americans, isn’t it?
Becky: It is, yes. A family unit in America used to be defined as a married man and woman with some children.
Eric: Is that not the case anymore?
Becky: In June 2015, same-sex marriage was legalized nationwide in the United States. Some individual states legalized it before that date.
Eric: What other types of families are there?
Becky: Not as many people choose to marry now, and more people are getting divorced, so it’s not always a married couple.
Eric: Yes, people often live together and have kids without getting married.
Becky: That’s right. People get divorced and then date someone new, so there are many step-families, where parents bring in children from other marriages.
Eric: There’s also many families where people don’t date anyone and go it alone.
Becky: Yes, single parent families are very common too.
Eric: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Becky: younger [natural native speed]
Eric: of fewer years
Becky: younger[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: younger [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: brother [natural native speed]
Eric: male sibling
Becky: brother [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: brother [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: yesterday [natural native speed]
Eric: the day before today
Becky: yesterday[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: yesterday [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: older [natural native speed]
Eric: of more years
Becky: older[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: older [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: similar [natural native speed]
Eric: not the same, but with common characteristics
Becky: similar[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: similar [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: hair [natural native speed]
Eric: the fine strands that grow from human's skin
Becky: hair[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: hair [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: argument [natural native speed]
Eric: an angry exchange of opposing opinions or ideas
Becky: argument[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: argument [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: few [natural native speed]
Eric: a small number of
Becky: few[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: few [natural native speed]
Eric: And lastly...
Becky: to sound [natural native speed]
Eric: to appear to be, to look like
Becky: to sound[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to sound [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Becky: younger
Eric: ...meaning "of fewer years" What can you tell us about this word?
Becky: “Younger” is the comparative form of “young.”
Eric: You use it to compare two things, and to say that one is not as old or of fewer years.
Becky: If you want to compare more things, you use the superlative form “youngest.”
Eric: The opposite word is “older.”
Becky: Which comes from the adjective “old.”
Eric: Can you give us an example using younger?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “He is younger than his brother.”
Eric: Which means "Of the two brothers, he is of fewer years." Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: Yesterday
Eric: meaning "the day before today." When do you use this word, Becky?
Becky: You use this to talk about a day of the week. It always means the day before today.
Eric: So if today is Monday...
Becky: Yesterday was Sunday.
Eric: What about the day after today?
Becky: We call that “tomorrow.”
Eric: Can you give us an example using yesterday?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “I met her yesterday.”
Eric: Which means "I met her on the day before today." Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: To sound
Eric: meaning "to appear to be, to look like." What can you tell us about this word?
Becky: This is a verb that conjugates regularly. It has a couple of meanings.
Eric: How is it being used here?
Becky: It can be used for something that appears to be something and has a certain impression.
Eric: So if your friend is always late, and they’re late again, you can say “Sounds like my friend!”
Becky: You have the impression of them always being late. It appears that they’re being their usual selves.
Eric: Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “Ah, it sounds like you're in trouble.”
Eric: Which means "It appears that you’re in trouble." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you'll learn about the prepositions “like” and “unlike”. I think it’s pretty obvious that these two words are closely linked!
Becky: Now why do you think that!?
Eric: Just a hunch! Let’s start with “like.”
Becky: As a preposition, you can use “like” for comparison and similarities.
Eric: If two or more things are similar, you can say that they are “like” each other.
Becky: For example, “I am like my mother.”
Eric: That means that in some way, Becky and her mother are similar.
Becky: A common phrase using this word is “look like.”
Eric: “They look like twins.”
Becky: Another example of “like” is “I graduated from Harvard, like you.”
Eric: I graduated from Harvard, and you graduated from Harvard. It is a similarity.
Becky: Another example is “It’s so cold today that it’s like winter came already.”
Eric: It’s not winter, but it’s as cold as winter. It’s similar to winter.
Becky: We don’t need days that are like winter...
Eric: No, we don’t! The next preposition is “unlike.”
Becky: This is the opposite of “like.” It’s for things that aren’t similar.
Eric: You can also use it to say that something is different from something else.
Becky: “I am unlike my mother.”
Eric: This time, Becky does not have any similarities with her mother.
Becky: “He's blonde, unlike the rest of his family.”
Eric: He’s blonde, but the rest of his family isn’t. He isn’t similar.
Becky: “Some countries in the EU chose not to adopt the Euro, unlike France.”
Eric: Some countries didn’t take the Euro. France did. It’s different from those countries.
Becky: Be careful though - I pointed out the phrase “look like” earlier. We don’t really say “look unlike” though.
Eric: We would say “doesn’t look like” instead.

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time!
Becky: Bye.

4 Comments

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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners! Try making a sentence using each one of the prepositions we learned on this lesson.
*Post them at the comments.

Englishclass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 01:05 AM
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Hi Awsome.

@Richelle


Thank you for commenting!


We are glad that you enjoyed the lesson!


If you ever have any questions, please let us know! ;)


Cristiane

Team Englishclass101.com

Awsome
Wednesday at 12:52 AM
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I like this because is very good and very fun how i learn and listen this dialogue

Richelle Lozada
Monday at 10:53 PM
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I liked how you explained theproper usage of like and unlike. The way you described prepositions and the proper way of saying it. Most Filipinos like us have difficulty in expressing phrases and sentences in the American way , that's why we sound a bit unnatural. But thanks to your team I learned the proper way on how to express it in the native American way.