Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to EnglishClass101.com. This is English Prepositions Made Easy Season 1 Lesson 22 - Looking Forward to your first American Office Christmas Party. Eric Here.
Becky: Hey I'm Becky.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn the prepositions “except” and “excluding”. The conversation takes place at work.
Becky: It's between Kate and Sean.
Eric: The speakers are co-workers, therefore, they will speak informal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Sean: I hear that you’re arranging the Christmas party this year.
Kate: That's right. Everyone is going except for Carl from HR.
Sean: How much will it cost?
Kate: It's $50 each, excluding drinks.
Sean: That's reasonable. Do I pay now or later?
Kate: Pay later, except for a $5 deposit.
Eric: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Sean: I hear that you are arranging the Christmas party this year.
Kate: That's right. Everyone is going except for Carl from HR.
Sean: How much will it cost?
Kate: It's $50 each, excluding drinks.
Sean: That's reasonable. Do I pay now or later?
Kate: Pay later, except for a $5 deposit.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Time for the office Christmas party!
Becky: That’s probably one of the most terrifying phrases you can hear.
Eric: Not a fan of office parties?
Becky: Not really! We spoke about birthday parties earlier in the series, but those aren’t the only parties you’ll see in America.
Eric: As we just heard, there are often Christmas parties, which Becky hates.
Becky: I don’t hate Christmas parties, just awkward office parties.
Eric: What other types of parties are there?
Becky: There are parties for moving, getting a new job, getting engaged, weddings…
Eric: Wow, lots of parties! There are parties for pregnant women too, right?
Becky: Yes, some mothers-to-be have baby showers, to help prepare for the arrival of the baby.
Eric: So, getting back to office parties. Do you have to go to parties organized by work?
Becky: You don’t have to, usually, but it’s expected.
Eric: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Becky: to arrange [natural native speed]
Eric: to organize
Becky: to arrange[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to arrange [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: everyone [natural native speed]
Eric: every person, each person
Becky: everyone[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: everyone [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: to cost [natural native speed]
Eric: to require payment for something
Becky: to cost[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to cost [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: each [natural native speed]
Eric: a piece
Becky: each[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: each [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: drinks [natural native speed]
Eric: a liquid that is drunk for refreshment
Becky: drinks[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: drinks [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: reasonable [natural native speed]
Eric: logical or fair or agreeable
Becky: reasonable[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: reasonable [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: to pay [natural native speed]
Eric: to give someone the money owed for services or goods
Becky: to pay[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to pay [natural native speed]
Eric: And last...
Becky: deposit [natural native speed]
Eric: a sum of money paid as an advance installment
Becky: deposit[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: deposit [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Becky: to arrange
Eric: Meaning "to organize." Becky, what can you tell us about this word?
Becky: This is a verb. The conjugations are regular. When writing, just remember to drop the “e” if you add an ending that starts with a vowel.
Eric: How do you use it?
Becky: You use it to describe organizing things, and also for organizing a party or meeting.
Eric: Can it be used as a noun?
Becky: No, but you can use “arrangement” instead.
Eric: Can you give us an example using “to arrange”?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “Is the meeting fully arranged for tomorrow?”
Eric: Which means "Is the meeting completely organized for tomorrow?" Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: Everyone
Eric: meaning "every person, each person." What can you tell us about this word?
Becky: This is a pronoun that’s used to mean every person, all the people.
Eric: If there is a group of people, and you want to talk about all of them, you can say “everyone.”
Becky: Yes. There are related words too, such as “everything” to mean “all things,” “everywhere” to mean “all places...”
Eric: And “everytime,” meaning all times.
Becky: “Every” plus another word is very useful!
Eric: Can you give us an example using “everyone”?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “Does everyone understand?”
Eric: Which means "Do all the people here understand?" Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: To pay
Eric: meaning "to give someone the money owed for services or goods". What can you tell us about this word?
Becky: This is a verb. The past tense and past participle are irregular and take the form “paid.”
Eric: How do you use it?
Becky: If I go to a store and buy something with money, then I have “paid” for it.
Eric: It specifically means giving money for what you have received.
Becky: That’s right.
Eric: Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “Shall I pay the bill?”
Eric: Which means "Shall I give money to cover the bill?" Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you'll learn about the prepositions “except” and “excluding”. Another two prepositions in this lesson.
Becky: We don’t have many more left to cover in this series.
Eric: No, so let’s get started right away. The first preposition is “except.”
Becky: This means “not including.”
Eric: For example, if you like all fruits but you don’t like apples, you can say...
Becky: “I like all fruits except apples.”
Eric: Apples are different to the other fruits as you don’t like them.
Becky: Another example is “Everyone is coming, except Ben.”
Eric: There’s a party, or event or something, and everyone is coming.
Becky: But Ben isn’t coming.
Eric: Ben is missing out!
Becky: Another example is “All trains to Brooklyn today are canceled due to the bad weather, except for the express train.”
Eric: Every train to Brooklyn is canceled. The express train, however, is still running.
Becky: Well, it’s still running for now, anyway.
Eric: The next preposition is “excluding.”
Becky: “Excluding” also means “not including.” In fact, they’re pretty interchangeable.
Eric: What’s the difference?
Becky: You’re more likely to hear “except,” especially in speech. Also, if we’re talking about a package deal that doesn’t include something, you can only use “excluding.”
Eric: We heard this in the conversation. Kate said “It's $50 each, excluding drinks.”
Becky: That’s right. The party package is $50, but doesn’t include drinks. You can’t say “It’s $50 each, except drinks.”
Eric: It has to be “excluding.” Let’s hear another example.
Becky: This is one where you can use both - “The office is open every day, excluding Tuesdays.”
Eric: But in that situation, you’re more likely to hear “except Tuesdays.”
Becky: I think so.

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time!
Becky: Bye.

3 Comments

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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners! Try making a sentence using each one of the prepositions we learned on this lesson.
*Post them at the comments.

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 06:47 PM
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Hi there Tracy,


Thanks for writing to us.


You can use either, both make sense. Using the word "for" gives a little bit more information.


I hope this helps. 😄👍


Kindly,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Tracy
Thursday at 10:27 PM
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Hi Eric and Becky


Why do you use "except for Carl" instead of "except Carl"?


Thanks