Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to EnglishClass101.com. This is English Prepositions Made Easy Season 1 Lesson 23 - What's All the Commotion on this American Street? Eric Here.
Becky: Hey I'm Becky.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn the prepositions “against” and “opposite”. The conversation takes place at work.
Becky: It's between Kate and Sean.
Eric: The speakers are co-workers, and they will use both formal and informal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Sean: What is that noise outside?
Kate: It's a demonstration against the recent tax hikes.
Sean: It sounds really close.
Kate: Yeah, the protesters' headquarters are opposite us.
Sean: If my desk wasn't against the window, maybe it wouldn't sound so noisy.
Kate: You can move to the desk opposite me for today, if you wish.
Eric: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Sean: What is that noise outside?
Kate: It's a demonstration against the recent tax hikes.
Sean: It sounds really close.
Kate: Yeah, the protesters' headquarters are opposite us.
Sean: If my desk wasn't against the window, maybe it wouldn't sound so noisy.
Kate: You can move to the desk opposite me for today, if you wish.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: I hope that they don’t have serious work to do, as it sounds like it’s a little noisy at the office this time.
Becky: Yeah, there is a protest happening outside. That’s bound to be distracting.
Eric: Are protests common in America?
Becky: Well, politics and freedom are important to Americans, and if we don’t feel that our voices are being heard, then we might protest.
Eric: What kinds of things do you protest against?
Becky: It can be employment related, like higher wages, or better health care, or it can be related to social issues.
Eric: I remember hearing on the news about some protests over the last couple of years against alleged police brutality.
Becky: That’s right. That’s been a hot topic for some communities.
Eric: And those protests then had counter protests...
Becky: Yeah, if you protest for, say, stricter gun control, then I bet that there will be people protesting against your protest.
Eric: Do protests work?
Becky: Sometimes, but even if the end goal isn’t reached, they raise awareness.
Eric: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Becky: noise [natural native speed]
Eric: sounds that are often loud and unwanted
Becky: noise[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: noise [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: demonstration [natural native speed]
Eric: a practical exhibition and explanation, a public gathering to protest something
Becky: demonstration[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: demonstration [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: tax [natural native speed]
Eric: compulsory contribution to state revenue
Becky: tax[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: tax [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: hike [natural native speed]
Eric: a steep increase
Becky: hike[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: hike [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: protester [natural native speed]
Eric: a person who publicly demonstrates and opposes something
Becky: protester[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: protester [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: headquarters [natural native speed]
Eric: the place that serves as a managerial and administrative center of an organization
Becky: headquarters[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: headquarters [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: window [natural native speed]
Eric: a glass opening in a wall that lets in light
Becky: window[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: window [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: to move [natural native speed]
Eric: to change position
Becky: to move[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to move [natural native speed]
Eric: And lastly...
Becky: to wish [natural native speed]
Eric: to want something to be true or to happen
Becky: to wish[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to wish [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Becky: noise
Eric: ...meaning "sounds that are often loud and unwanted." What can you tell us about this word?
Becky: The key part is loud and unwanted.
Eric: If there is loud music that we want to listen to, we wouldn’t call that “noise.”
Becky: No. If the loud music is coming from our neighbors and we don’t want to hear it, then that would be “noise.”
Eric: Can this be used as an adjective?
Becky: No, but we can call things “noisy.”
Eric: Can you give us an example using noise?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “The only noise I can hear is you slurping your soup.”
Eric: Which means "The only unwanted sounds I can hear is you slurping your soup."
Eric: Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: To move
Eric: meaning "to change where someone lives." When do you use this word?
Becky: This verb is generally used for the action of changing place or position.
Eric: So if you were on the first floor and then went to the second floor, you have “moved” to the second floor.
Becky: That’s right. It also has a specific meaning of changing where you live.
Eric: If we say “I’m moving...”
Becky: It means that we are physically moving from one house to another.
Eric: Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “It's too hot today. Let's move out of the sun.”
Eric: Which means "It’s too hot today. Let’s go to a place that isn’t in the sun." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you'll learn about the prepositions “against” and “opposite”. Two more prepositions to cross off the list in this lesson!
Becky: You like seeing these prepositions being crossed off the list, don’t you?
Eric: I do. We’re making progress. The first preposition is “against.”
Becky: We can use “against” to say that we oppose a concept or idea.
Eric: If the idea is that everyone can go home at 3pm and we don’t agree with that, then we are “against” it.
Becky: I don’t see why anyone would be against that, but yes, that’s how it works!
Eric: Can you give us a more typical example?
Becky: “I’m against animal testing.”
Eric: I don’t agree with, and oppose, testing medicine or makeup on animals.
Becky: Or “The group is against elementary school testing.”
Eric: The group doesn’t agree with testing elementary school children.
Becky: You can also use “against” in a sports context, to say what opponent you’re facing.
Eric: For example, if there’s a game tomorrow with the Dallas Cowboys and the New Orleans Saints, we could say...
Becky: “The Dallas Cowboys are playing against the New Orleans Saints tomorrow.”
Eric: The next preposition is “opposite.”
Becky: We looked at “opposite” in lesson 8, so let’s review it here. It can be used for place, to say that something is on the other side or facing another object.
Eric: Let’s hear an example.
Becky: “I live opposite the park.”
Eric: Becky, why are we reviewing “opposite” here?
Becky: It’s because “opposite” can have a similar meaning to “against.” Take the sentence “I have the opposite view from him.”
Eric: That means that I have a different view from him, and might even be against him.
Becky: But it’s different because “opposite” is being used as an adjective here, not a preposition.
Eric: So although their meanings can be similar, they serve different functions in a sentence.
Becky: So don’t mix them up!

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time!
Becky: Bye!

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