Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to EnglishClass101.com. This is English Prepositions Made Easy Season 1 Lesson 24 - Do You Feel Like an American Snack? Eric Here.
Becky: Hey I'm Becky.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn the prepositions “with” and “without”. The conversation takes place at a bar.
Becky: It's between Kate and Sean.
Eric: The speakers are friends, so they will use informal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Sean: I'll have a soda.
Kate: With ice or without ice?
Sean: Without ice. What do you want?
Kate: I'm not very thirsty, but I am hungry.
Sean: The bar serves snacks. You could order some fries.
Kate: I'll have a plate of small fries with ketchup.
Eric: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Sean: I'll have a soda.
Kate: With ice or without ice?
Sean: Without ice. What do you want?
Kate: I'm not very thirsty, but I am hungry.
Sean: The bar serves snacks. You could order some fries.
Kate: I'll have a plate of small fries with ketchup.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Kate and Sean seem to be having a friendly drink and snack together.
Becky: Yes, fries are a common order for a snack if you’re in a bar.
Eric: What types of meals are popular in America?
Becky: Well, when people think of American food, they might think of fast food such as hamburgers or pizzas.
Eric: I think so too.
Becky: They are popular in the States, both for eating at home and eating out, but there’s many more types of popular dishes too.
Eric: What else is popular?
Becky: People love to cook at home if they have time, and the food is usually heavy and filling.
Eric: What kind of meals do people cook at home?
Becky: Pies, hot pots, macaroni, pastas, roasts… There’re many options.
Eric: What about desserts? Those are my favorite part of any meal.
Becky: Baked goods are popular, such as cookies, muffins and the good old American apple pie.
Eric: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Becky: soda [natural native speed]
Eric: soft drink, carbonated or bubbly drink
Becky: soda[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: soda [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: ice [natural native speed]
Eric: frozen water
Becky: ice[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: ice [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: thirsty [natural native speed]
Eric: to want or need something to drink
Becky: thirsty[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: thirsty [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: hungry [natural native speed]
Eric: to want or need something to eat
Becky: hungry[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: hungry [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: to serve [natural native speed]
Eric: to help, to attend to, to work for
Becky: to serve[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to serve [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: snack [natural native speed]
Eric: food eaten between meals
Becky: snack[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: snack [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have….
Becky: to order [natural native speed]
Eric: to request something to be made or delivered
Becky: to order[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to order [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: plate [natural native speed]
Eric: a flat dish to eat food off of
Becky: plate[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: plate [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: small [natural native speed]
Eric: not big, little
Becky: small[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: small [natural native speed]
Eric: And last...
Becky: ketchup [natural native speed]
Eric: tomato-based condiment
Becky: ketchup[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: ketchup [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Becky: hungry
Eric: ...meaning "to want or need something to eat." What can you tell us about this adjective?
Becky: You use this to describe being in a state of wanting or needing food.
Eric: What about if you need something to drink?
Becky: In that case, you say “thirsty.”
Eric: Are there any other words you can use instead of “hungry?”
Becky: You can say “starving,” but this is informal. It means being hungry to the point of death, so it’s best not to use it in formal situations.
Eric: Can you give us an example using “hungry?”
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “I haven't eaten since lunch so I'm hungry.”
Eric: Which means "I haven’t eaten since lunch, so I need something to eat."
Eric: Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: To order
Eric: meaning "to request something to be made or delivered." What can you tell us about this word?
Becky: This is a verb and it conjugates in a regular way.
Eric: What is it used for?
Becky: It’s often used in restaurants, when you request your food.
Eric: Can it be used as a noun too?
Becky: Yes, you can say that food you have asked for is your “order.”
Eric: Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “Have you ordered yet?”
Eric: Which means "Have you asked for the food you wanted yet?" Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you'll learn about the prepositions “with” and “without”. Lesson 24, we’re nearly at the end...
Becky: Just a little further to go! We can do it!
Eric: Let’s start with the first preposition for this class, “with.”
Becky: We use this to mean accompanying and together.
Eric: Yes, like “burger with ketchup.”
Becky: It can also be used for connecting and relating things together.
Eric: Like, “she agrees with me.”
Becky: We use “with” in between the items being linked. When it’s used to mean “together,” it’s usually used with nouns, like the “burger and ketchup” example from earlier.
Eric: When you use it to connect and relate things, it can be used with many types of words - “She agrees with me” connects a verb with a pronoun.
Becky: Here’s another example. “I went shopping with my mom.”
Eric: Becky and her mom went shopping together.
Becky: “He completed the work on time with difficulty.”
Eric: Here are two things - completing the work and having difficulty. “With” links them together to show that the difficulty was in finishing the work. Ok, the next preposition is “without.”
Becky: You can use this to mean “not accompanying” and “not together” - as in “burger without ketchup.”
Eric: It can also be used to connect and relate things in a negative way.
Becky: But be careful. We can’t say “She agrees without me.” Instead we would say, “she doesn’t agree with me.”
Eric: Let’s have another example.
Becky: “I went shopping without my mom.”
Eric: My mom didn’t go shopping with me.
Becky: “He changed lanes without warning.”
Eric: Here are two things - changing lanes when driving, and not giving a warning. “Without” links them to show that the warning wasn’t given when changing lanes.
Becky: The last example is “He completed the work on time without difficulty.”
Eric: This time, it was easy for him to finish the work on time.

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time!
Becky: Bye!

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Hi Listeners! Try making a sentence using each one of the prepositions we learned on this lesson.
*Post them at the comments.