Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to EnglishClass101.com. This is English Prepositions Made Easy Season 1 Lesson 25 - What's Missing from this American Restaurant Check? Eric Here.
Becky: Hey I'm Becky.
Eric: In this final lesson of the series, you’ll learn the prepositions “plus” and “minus.” The conversation takes place at a bar.
Becky: It's between Kate and Sean.
Eric: The speakers are friends, so they will use informal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Kate: Wait, I don't think this check is right.
Sean: What's wrong?
Kate: We ordered everything on here, minus this pizza.
Sean: And I think it should be plus another plate of fries.
Kate: Oh, you're right. We should ask the bartender to correct it.
Sean: Maybe he will take a little more off the total to apologize for the mistake.
Eric: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Kate: Wait, I don't think this check is right.
Sean: What's wrong?
Kate: We ordered everything on here, minus this pizza.
Sean: And I think it should be plus another plate of fries.
Kate: Oh, you're right. We should ask the bartender to correct it.
Sean: Maybe he will take a little more off the total to apologize for the mistake.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Wow, sounds like the bar made a mess of their order.
Becky: I know! They put something extra on, and left something else off.
Eric: We spoke about customer service in an earlier lesson, but what happens if the service has been bad?
Becky: You might need to complain.
Eric: What kind of things do people complain about?
Becky: Late or cold food, slow service, broken products… There are many things to complain about.
Eric: How should we complain if we need to?
Becky: First, speak to a member of staff. If possible, speak to the staff member who served you.
Eric: If it was an online purchase, the website should have a complaints procedure.
Becky: You can also sometimes voice your complaint publically via social media.
Eric: The ultimate and most formal complaint is in writing.
Becky: These last two are often a last resort. I think most people these days would rather talk things through.
Eric: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Becky: check [natural native speed]
Eric: notice of amount owed at a restaurant
Becky: check[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: check [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: right [natural native speed]
Eric: correct
Becky: right[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: right [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: pizza [natural native speed]
Eric: a food that originated in Italy and is usually a flat, round dough covered in various toppings
Becky: pizza[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: pizza [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: fries [natural native speed]
Eric: potatoes that have been cut and fried
Becky: fries[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: fries [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: to ask [natural native speed]
Eric: to request something from someone
Becky: to ask[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to ask [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: bartender [natural native speed]
Eric: someone that works in a bar serving drinks
Becky: bartender[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: bartender [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Becky: correct [natural native speed]
Eric: free from error
Becky: correct[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: correct [natural native speed]
Eric: And last...
Becky: mistake [natural native speed]
Eric: to get something wrong, to make an error
Becky: mistake[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: mistake [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Becky: check
Eric: ...meaning "a notice of the amount owed at a restaurant." What can you tell us about this word?
Becky: This is a noun, and we use it to describe the list of food and drinks we bought in a restaurant and the total cost.
Eric: You usually only see the check at the end of the meal.
Becky: Yes. In some restaurants, you have to ask for the check and it’s a clear way to show that you’re finished.
Eric: You can say something as simple as “Check, please!”
Becky: Or you can be more polite and say “Can I have the check, please?”
Eric: Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “Shall I ask for the check?”
Eric: Which means "Shall I ask for the bill?" Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: Right
Eric: No, I’m asking you.
Becky: I know. Right!
Eric: So what’s the word?
Becky: The word is “right”.
Eric: Oh, meaning "correct." What can you tell us about this word?
Becky: “Right” has many meanings. It can be used to mean you agree, which is why Eric and I got confused. It can also be a direction.
Eric: But in the conversation, it means “to be correct”.
Becky: Yes. “Correct” means the same but is more formal.
Eric: The opposite to “right” is “wrong.” Can you give us an example using right?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “I think this is the right way to the hotel.”
Eric: Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: Mistake
Eric: meaning "to get something wrong, to make an error." What can you tell us about this?
Becky: This kinda follows on from the last word.
Eric: Yes, I guess it does!
Becky: The last word was “right” but this word, “mistake,” means wrong.
Eric: A mistake can be anything that is wrong, from a spelling mistake to going to the wrong place.
Becky: A more formal word for it is “error.”
Eric: Can you give us an example using mistake?
Becky: For example, you can say, “I made a mistake when I counted how many people were coming.”
Eric: Which means "I got it wrong when I counted how many people were coming." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you'll learn about the prepositions “plus” and “minus”. And it’s the last lesson!
Becky: It is! 24 down, only one to go.
Eric: So let’s make it a good lesson! The first preposition is “plus.”
Becky: We use this to add two or more things together.
Eric: It’s mainly used in informal writing and speech about finance and numbers.
Becky: And math. I’m not a fan of math! An example is “It costs $100, plus $10 in fees.”
Eric: I’m not a fan of math either, but I’m pretty sure that means that it costs $110 total.
Becky: That’s right! Another example is “I owe you money for the tickets and hotel, plus gas.”
Eric: So, I owe you money for the tickets, the hotel, and the gas.
Becky: By saying “tickets and hotel, plus gas,” you’re putting emphasis on owing gas. Maybe it wasn’t part of the original deal, maybe it’s something that’s just been added… There’s a small difference with saying “plus” instead of “and,” but the basic meaning is the same.
Eric: The next preposition is “minus.”
Becky: This is basically opposite to “plus.”
Eric: More math?
Becky: More math! But this time we are taking away.
Eric: Can you give us an example?
Becky: “It cost $100 minus a $10 discount.”
Eric: So it’d cost $90, after the discount has been taken into account.
Becky: That’s right. Do you want an example that isn’t math?
Eric: Yes please!
Becky: “I bought all of my clothes in this store, minus the coat.”
Eric: So everything was bought in this store, but the coat was bought somewhere else.
Becky: Yes. And one last example “It’s $200, minus the $20 deposit you already paid, so you owe $180.”
Eric: I like that example. The math was already done.
Becky: I thought you might!

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson,
Becky: and for this series.
Eric: We hope you enjoyed it and found it useful.
Becky: Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you in another series!
Eric: Bye!

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Hi Listeners! Try making a sentence using each one of the prepositions we learned on this lesson.
*Post them at the comments.