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Lesson Transcript

English Prepositions Made Easy Season 1 Lesson 3 - Deciding Where to Hang a Painting By Your Favorite American Artist
INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to EnglishClass101.com. This is English Prepositions Made Easy, Season 1 Lesson 3 - Deciding Where to Hang a Painting By Your Favorite American Artist. John Here.
Becky: Hey I'm Becky.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn the prepositions “under”, “below” and “beneath”. The conversation takes place at home.
Becky: It's between Kate and Sean.
John: The speakers are friends, so they'll use informal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Sean: Kate, where do you think I should hang this painting?
Kate: Try below the other painting on the south wall.
Sean: Oh, looks good! Have you seen my hammer?
Kate: I think it's under the table.
Sean: Really? I can't see it.
Kate: Maybe it's beneath that cloth.
Sean: Found it!
John: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Sean: Kate, where do you think I should hang this painting?
Kate: Try below the other painting on the south wall.
Sean: Oh, looks good! Have you seen my hammer?
Kate: I think it's under the table.
Sean: Really? I can't see it.
Kate: Maybe it's beneath that cloth.
Sean: Found it!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: Sounds like Sean has a new painting. I wonder if he painted it himself?
Becky: He might have! He might have bought it though. The right painting can really brighten up a room.
John: That’s true. I think that in general, Americans are very proud of their homes and want them to look the best they can.
Becky: I think so too. It helps that, compared to a lot of other countries, house prices aren’t as high in the States, so people can buy really nice properties.
John: Many people buy houses and then fix them up themselves.
Becky: Oh, DIY! Home improvements! Fixer-uppers! That’s always a disaster.
John: A disaster? I’ve always been able to do small jobs myself without any problems.
Becky: In my experience, if you need a job done, call in the professionals.
John: Please tell me that you at least do yard work yourself.
Becky: I do that myself. I find it relaxing!
John: Do you decorate your house for Halloween and Christmas?
Becky: Oh, I go all out! Lights, statues…
John: Me too. Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Becky: to think [natural native speed]
John: to consider
Becky: to think[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to think [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: painting [natural native speed]
John: artwork made with paint
Becky: painting[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: painting [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: other [natural native speed]
John: not this one, but a different one
Becky: other[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: other [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: south [natural native speed]
John: direction opposite of north
Becky: south[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: south [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: wall [natural native speed]
John: a vertical structure that either divides a room, or separates a room from the outside
Becky: wall[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: wall [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: to look [natural native speed]
John: to appear, to seem
Becky: to look[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to look [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: hammer [natural native speed]
John: a tool used for jobs such as hitting nails and breaking things
Becky: hammer[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: hammer [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: table [natural native speed]
John: a piece of furniture with a flat, level surface and legs, upon which objects can be placed
Becky: table[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: table [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: maybe [natural native speed]
John: possibly, but not certainly, perhaps
Becky: maybe [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: maybe [natural native speed]
John: And last..
Becky: cloth [natural native speed]
John: fabric that is made from cotton, wool, or other materials
Becky: cloth[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: cloth [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Becky: to think
John: meaning "to consider". What can you tell us about this?
Becky: We use this verb to talk about our ideas.
John: The conjugations are irregular, as the past tense and the past participle are both “thought.”
Becky: This is a handy word. We can use it to clearly show our own ideas.
John: You can start sentences with “I think…” or “I think that…” and people will know it is your own idea and feelings.
Becky: If you put it at the end of a sentence after giving advice or an opinion, it softens what you've said.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “I think it will rain later.”
John: ..which means "I feel that it will rain later." Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: other
John: meaning "not this one, but a different one"
John: What can you tell us about this?
Becky: You can use this when an object has been identified, but you want to talk about a different one.
John: So, if you’re in a shop and the clerk has two items - they show you the first item but you want to see the second item, you can say “show me the other one.”
Becky: Yes, “other” means the different item.
John: What if the second item isn’t already there?
Becky: If you’re shown the first item, and want to see something else, anything else, you can use “another.”
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “the other way is quicker.”
John: Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: maybe
John: meaning "possibly, but not certainly, perhaps."
John: What can you tell us about this?
Becky: This is an adverb. You use it when you aren’t 100% sure of something.
John: You usually use it at the start or end of a sentence or clause.
Becky: It can also be a one-word answer.
John: If someone asks you a question and you don’t want to say “yes” or “no,” you can say “maybe.”
Becky: If you’re not certain, say “maybe!”
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “Maybe I will change jobs soon.”
John: .. which means "I might change jobs soon"
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about the prepositions “under”, “below” and “beneath”.
John: You can use these prepositions for place and position. I think that they are very easily confused.
Becky: Definitely. Their meanings are very similar, but they are different enough to be distinct.
John: Let’s start with the first in our little list - “under.”
Becky: You use this to say something is lower than, directly below, or covered by something.
John: It’s very commonly used for things like “under the table.”
Becky: Right. It’s below the table and the table is covering it. It’s also used when being covered by things that touch.
John: Can you give us an example of that?
Becky: Sure. “He is wearing a shirt under his sweater.” It’s often used with clothes.
John: There are lots of idioms using “under” too, such as “under the weather.” This means that you’re feeling sick. Check out the Lesson Notes for more idioms using “under”.
Becky: What preposition is next on our list?
John: Ah, next is “below.”
Becky: This is used for things that are lower than, or not directly under something,
John: Let’s hear an example.
Becky: “We’re painting the room and I want white walls, but with blue below this border.”
John: It can also be used to talk about lower temperatures or height, right?
Becky: That’s right. Like “The temperature is never below zero.”
John: Our last preposition for this lesson is “beneath.”
Becky: This is more formal than “under” and “below”, and can be used in place of either, really.
John: Can you give us some examples using “beneath?”
Becky: “The cat lies beneath the window.” Although, we’d usually say “the cat lies under the window.”
John: Hmm, it sounds too formal for a simple sentence like that.
Becky: Right, it’s grammatically correct, but too formal. We often use it for style, such as “There is a world of mystery beneath the covers of this book.”
John: That sounds better than saying “under the covers of this book.”
Becky: I agree. But, be careful. You can substitute “beneath” for “under” and “below,” but not when talking about temperatures.
John: Thanks for the tip!

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Becky: Bye

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Wednesday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners! Try making a sentence using each one of the prepositions we learned on this lesson.

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