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Lesson Transcript

English Prepositions Made Easy Season 1 Lesson 6 - Is Your Dog Missing in the United States?
INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to EnglishClass101.com. This is English Prepositions Made Easy Season 1 Lesson 6 - Is Your Dog Missing in the United States? John Here.
Becky: Hey I'm Becky.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn the prepositions “inside” and “into”. The conversation takes place at home.
Becky: It's between Kate and Sean.
John: The speakers are friends, so they'll use informal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Kate: Have you seen Belle?
Sean: Who...? Oh! That's your dog, isn't it?
Kate: That's right. I thought she was in her kennel, but she isn't.
Sean: I think I saw her go into the house earlier.
Kate: I'll check inside the house then. Thank you!
Sean: I hope you can find her!
John: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Kate: Have you seen Belle?
Sean: Who...? Oh! That's your dog, isn't it?
Kate: That's right. I thought she was in her kennel, but she isn't.
Sean: I think I saw her go into the house earlier.
Kate: I'll check inside the house then. Thank you!
Sean: I hope you can find her!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: I hope Kate found her dog.
Becky: I hope so too! America is a nation of animal lovers.
John: Yeah, lots of people have cats and dogs as pets.
Becky: You always see people walking their dogs early in the morning or at night. The park near where I grew up had an area just for you to take your dog.
John: That’s cool! Did you have a pet dog?
Becky: Yeah, I did. We rescued him from the dog pound.
John: Lots of people get their dogs from the pound, right?
Becky: Yeah. Getting dogs from breeders happens too.
John: Outside of big cities, you might find farms with many other types of animals too.
Becky: Yeah. But no matter how big or small the animal is, it is important that you look after it correctly.
John: There are many organizations that look out for animal cruelty, so be sure to take care of any animal that you have. You can also report animals that you see being mistreated to these organizations.
Becky: As we said, America is a nation of animal lovers!
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Becky: to see [natural native speed]
John: to observe with the eyes
Becky: to see[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to see [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: dog [natural native speed]
John: a domesticated animal that has four legs and barks
Becky: dog[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: dog [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: kennel [natural native speed]
John: a house for dogs
Becky: kennel[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: kennel [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: but [natural native speed]
John: a word used to introduce a sentence or clause that contradicts some aspect of the preceding clause
Becky: but[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: but [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: house [natural native speed]
John: a dwelling for a family
Becky: house[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: house [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: earlier [natural native speed]
John: A point of time before another
Becky: earlier[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: earlier [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: to check [natural native speed]
John: to confirm, to look at
Becky: to check[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to check [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Becky: to hope [natural native speed]
John: to have a desire that something will happen
Becky: to hope[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to hope [natural native speed]
John: And lastly..
Becky: to find [natural native speed]
John: to discover something
Becky: to find[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to find [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Becky: ...but...
John: meaning "a word used to introduce a sentence or clause that contradicts some aspect of the preceding clause." What can you tell us about this word?
Becky: This is a conjunction, so you use it to connect two sentences or clauses.
John: Specifically, two clauses or sentences that contradict each other.
Becky: Yes. Take the two sentences “It’s summer” and “it’s cold.”
John: It usually isn’t cold during the summer, so these two sentences contradict each other.
Becky: So if you want to join them, you can use “but.” For example, “It’s summer, but it’s cold.”
John: Can you give us another example using “but”?
Becky: Sure. You can say, “She said she'd meet me at 2pm, but she's late.”
John: Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: Earlier...
John: ...meaning "a point of time before another." What can you tell us about this?
Becky: This comes from the adjective “early” and is the comparative form.
John: That means we can use it to compare two things.
Becky: Yeah, we use it to say that one thing happened before another.
John: So if I say “I ate earlier”...
Becky: It means that you ate at a time before now.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: For example, you can say, “I watched the movie earlier.”
John: Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: To hope...
John: ...meaning "to have a desire that something will happen."
John: What can you tell us about this?
Becky: This is a verb. The conjugations are pretty regular. Just be careful with the “e” at the end when spelling it out. “Hoping,” for example, is spelled without an “e.”
John: You can use this to talk about what you want to happen.
Becky: Right. For example, “I hope it will be sunny tomorrow.”
John: That means “I would like it to be sunny tomorrow.”
Becky: It is our wish and desire for it to be sunny.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “I hope to get married next year.”
John: Which means "I would like to get married next year." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about the prepositions “inside” and “into”. Again, we have two prepositions that sound pretty similar.
Becky: They do, so listeners, pay attention to their usage and differences!
John: Let’s start with “inside.”
Becky: This is used for place and position. We use it to say that something is in something else.
John: It has a feeling of being enclosed.
Becky: Right. We would use it for something like “inside the box.” “Outside” means the opposite.
John: Let’s look at some examples.
Becky: “I left my purse inside the house.”
John: “My car broke down inside the tunnel, so I am waiting for a tow truck.”
Becky: “House” and “tunnel” are both enclosed spaces, and in both examples the object of the sentence is in the house or tunnel.
John: In a lot of cases, you can use “in” instead of “inside.”
Becky: That’s right. You can say either “The girl is in the car” or “The girl is inside the car.”
John: One thing to remember, though, is that you can’t use “inside” for countries and cities.
Becky: “The White House is in Washington” is correct. But “The White House is inside Washington” isn’t.
John: A famous idiom using “inside” is “inside job.”
Becky: This is when a crime is committed and it’s likely that someone working for the company helped. So you’ll hear it in sentences like “The police think that the bank robbery was an inside job.”
John: Meaning someone working at the bank must have helped. Our next preposition is “into.”
Becky: We use “into” for movement. It’s used to talk about moving inside something.
John: This can be used for movement across countries and cities too.
Becky: That’s right. Shall we look at some examples?
John: I think we should!
Becky: “I put my pen into my pencil case.”
John: “Although it was raining, he didn’t go into the house.”
Becky: “After two weeks of cycling through Europe, we finally crossed the border into Italy.”
John: That’s a lot of cycling!

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Becky: Bye

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Hi Listeners! Try making a sentence using each one of the prepositions we learned on this lesson.

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