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Lesson Transcript

English Prepositions Made Easy Season 1 Lesson 7 - Finding a Long-Lost Diary in the United States
INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to EnglishClass101.com. This is English Prepositions Made Easy Season 1 Lesson 7 - Finding a Long-Lost Diary in the United States. John Here.
Becky: Hey I'm Becky.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn about the prepositions “between” and “among”. The conversation takes place at work.
Becky: It's between Rachel and Sean.
John: The speakers are co-workers, and they will use both formal and informal English. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Rachel: Oh! That's my diary, I've been looking for it everywhere. Where did you find it?
Sean: It was hidden among the files for the meeting later.
Rachel: I must have left it there earlier.
Sean: Do you want me to put it on your desk?
Rachel: Yes, please! Can you put it between those two books?
Sean: Sure!
John: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Rachel: Oh! That's my diary, I've been looking for it everywhere. Where did you find it?
Sean: It was hidden among the files for the meeting later.
Rachel: I must have left it there earlier.
Sean: Do you want me to put it on your desk?
Rachel: Yes, please! Can you put it between those two books?
Sean: Sure!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: Rachel was lucky to find her lost diary.
Becky: Yeah, she was lucky that she lost it at work.
John: What would happen if you lost something somewhere else?
Becky: I’d suggest retracing your steps and seeing if you could find it. Also, contact the authorities.
John: So if you’ve been on the train, contact the train company.
Becky: That’s right. You can advertise your lost item if it’s something of value.
John: I see posters for lost pets a lot.
Becky: Yeah, it’s common to advertise a lost pet. If you do advertise, you can offer a reward and that sometimes helps you get your item back.
John: What should you do if you find something?
Becky: Hand it in somewhere. Many public places have a Lost and Found office, or you can give it to the police.
John: Is it likely that you’ll get something back if you lose it?
Becky: I wouldn’t count on it. I would advise not losing things in the first place!
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Becky: diary [natural native speed]
John: a book where someone writes their memories and information on their day
Becky: diary[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: diary [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Becky: everywhere [natural native speed]
John: all places
Becky: everywhere[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: everywhere [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Becky: to hide [natural native speed]
John: to stay out of sight
Becky: to hide[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to hide [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Becky: files [natural native speed]
John: a folder that keeps loose documents together
Becky: files[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: files [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Becky: meeting [natural native speed]
John: a gathering of people, usually in order to discuss something
Becky: meeting[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: meeting [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Becky: later [natural native speed]
John: at a time after another
Becky: later[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: later [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Becky: to leave [natural native speed]
John: to depart, to go away from
Becky: to leave[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: to leave [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Becky: desk [natural native speed]
John: a table used for work
Becky: desk[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: desk [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Becky: book [natural native speed]
John: a written text that often tells a story or gives information
Becky: book[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: book [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Becky: sure [natural native speed]
John: having no doubt about something
Becky: sure[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Becky: sure [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Becky: ...everywhere...
John: meaning "all places." What can you tell us about this word?
Becky: Look at it as two separate words - “every,” meaning “all,” and “where” meaning place.
John: So, “all places.”
Becky: Yep. For example, if something is on sale and you can buy it “everywhere,” that means it’s on sale across the country.
John: And probably in several different stores too.
Becky: “Everywhere” can also be used to exaggerate. So, you might hear someone saying something is happening “everywhere” when they really mean that it’s happening in many places.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “I looked everywhere for my lost bag.”
John: Which means "I looked in all places for my lost bag."
John: Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: Later...
John: ...meaning "at a time after another." What can you tell us about this?
Becky: You use this to describe a time period after another.
John: So if we say “See you later”...
Becky: ...it means “I will see you again at a time after this.”
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “I will call you later.”
John: Which means "I will call you at a time after this." Okay, what's the next word?
Becky: Sure...
John: ...meaning "having no doubt." When do you use this word?
Becky: You can use this to say that you are certain of something.
John: You often hear it in a question like “Are you sure?”
Becky: Yes, you can say that phrase to double check that someone is certain.
John: It can also be used as an exclamation, right?
Becky: If we say “Sure!”, it means something similar to “yes.” You’re agreeing to something.
John: Can you give us another example using this word?
Becky: Sure. For example, you can say, “I'm sure that he was here.”
John: ...which means "I’m certain that he was here." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about the prepositions “between” and “among.”
John: Let’s start with the preposition “between.”
Becky: “Between” can be used in many ways, but all of them are related to the space in the middle of two things.
John: Okay. Let’s look in more detail about how it can be used.
Becky: It can be used for physical space in the middle of two objects.
John: Like “Put the lamp between the table and the wall.”
Becky: The time, in the middle of two dates.
John: “The beach is always busy between June to September.”
Becky: The interval in the middle of two points on a scale.
John: “Between 30% to 50% of applicants fail the exam.”
Becky: To choose or show differences.
John: “I can’t choose between Canada, Mexico, and Hawaii for my summer vacation.”
Becky: “Between” refers to the interval, so “between June to September,” means June, July, August and September.
John: Not just June and September.
Becky: There is a famous idiom using “between” - “between a rock and a hard place.”
John: That means to choose between two difficult situations. Such as “The exam and the job interview are scheduled for the same time so I can’t do both. I’m stuck between a rock and a hard place.”
Becky: That’s right! What is the next preposition for this lesson?
John: The next, and last, is “among.”
Becky: This has several meanings too. It can mean to be surrounded by many things.
John: “The dog ran among the flowers.”
Becky: To belong to a group or a relationship.
John: “The candy was shared evenly among the children.”
Becky: Or, a choice or decision between three or more unspecified things.
John: “He was the best choice among the candidates.”
Becky: In every situation, “among” means that there are several things and gives an image of groups.
John: Thank you!
Becky: Listeners, make sure to check the Lesson Notes PDF to find more examples and additional information.

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Becky: Bye

3 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners! Try making a sentence using each one of the prepositions we learned on this lesson.

*Post them at the comments.

 

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 09:15 AM
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Hello Eva,


Thank you so much for your positive message! 😇❤️️

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

We wish you good luck with your language studies.


Kind regards,

Levente

Team EnglishClass101.com

Eva
Tuesday at 05:50 PM
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Nice❤️️