Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Sadia: Hey, everyone. Thanks for tuning in. This is Sadia.
Keith: And I’m Keith. Welcome to Gengo English, Lesson 18 - “Pickup Lines that Don't Work, and Ones that Do!”
Sadia: In our last lesson, Lesson 17, you learned how to find
the person you're looking for.
Keith: And you also learned about the verb, "to know," and
negative statements.
SADIA:
In this lesson you will learn how to talk about the
frequency of actions.
Keith: And this conversation takes place outside of a sports arena.
Sadia: This conversation is between Zo and his two colleagues.
Keith: Alright, well let’s listen in to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Zo: Thanks again. How often do you do this?
Colleague #1: Usually 1 time per season. Hey, what's that?
Zo: This? Oh, it's just a book...
Colleague #1: "Pickup Lines that Work, Guaranteed! Meet American
Girls!" Pass it over.
Zo: [nervously] Here you are.
Colleague #2: [clears throat and imitates Barry White] "So, do you
come here often?" [laughing] Zo, you cheeky guy! You
little devil!
Zo: Me? No!
Colleague #1: [laughs] Just kidding. "You must be tired, because
you've been running through my mind all day!" [laughs]
Colleague #2: That will NOT work!
Zo: Then what do you say?
Colleague #1: I sometimes say, "Hi, there. Having a good time?" I
won't say, "So, do you come here often?".
Colleague #2: I always say, "It's nice to see you here."
Zo: That works?
Colleague #1: It always works. 100 percent guaranteed.
Keith: One more time, slowly.
Zo: Thanks again. How often do you do this?
Colleague #1: Usually 1 time per season. Hey, what's that?
Zo: This? Oh, it's just a book...
Colleague #1: "Pickup Lines that Work, Guaranteed! Meet American
Girls!" Pass it over.
Zo: [nervously] Here you are.
Colleague #2: [clears throat and imitates Barry White] "So, do you
come here often?" [laughing] Zo, you cheeky guy! You
little devil!
Zo: Me? No!
Colleague #1: [laughs] Just kidding. "You must be tired, because
you've been running through my mind all day!" [laughs]
Colleague #2: That will NOT work!
Zo: Then what do you say?
Colleague #1: I sometimes say, "Hi, there. Having a good time?" I
won't say, "So, do you come here often?".
Colleague #2: I always say, "It's nice to see you here."
Zo: That works?
Colleague #1: It always works. 100 percent guaranteed.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Sadia: This is, by far, one of the friendliest—and one of
the most informal—conversations.
Keith: Yeah, it seems like they and Zo have become fast friends.
Sadia: And what this means, is that they met a very short time ago but they’re already comfortable enough to goof around, to make jokes, and to use a lot of slang. And they’re comfortable enough to talk about a subject that can get a little personal...
Keith: Like, uh, dating! right?
Sadia: Uh-huh. This kind of banter—talk about dating and women—I’d say it’s fairly common among men of this age group, wouldn't you say?
Keith: Well, that’s what’s on our minds a lot. Dating and women. For young men, I guess, right after about kindergarten I think. This is a common conversation.
Sadia: Zo’s colleagues discover that Zo has been doing a little bit of studying—and they’re quick to
take a look at his textbook, “Pick Up Lines that Work, Guaranteed! Meet American Girls!” Scary title for a book, if you ask me.
Keith: No, uh, I think it’s very enticing. I want that book.
Sadia: It doesn’t put you off? It’s not too..
Keith: It’s guaranteed! What does guaranteed mean?
Sadia: “Guaranteed” means that the person who has made the product promises you that it will work.
Keith: Yeah, so they guarantee me, they promise me, that it’s going to work. I believe them.
Sadia: So maybe it’s not that bad, after all.
Keith: Well, Zo, he seems to be a little embarrassed that his friends have found out what he’s reading— and perhaps because it’s not “cool” to need help “picking up” women. But Tom and his coworker are quick to “school” Zo, and what that means is to educate him, to teach him the fine art of attracting women..
Sadia: However, something tells me they’re not that good at it themselves!
Keith: Probably. Alright, well let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
The first word we shall see is:
Sadia: to come [natural native speed]
Keith: to move toward something
Sadia: to come [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: to come [natural native speed]
Next:"
to do [natural native speed]
Keith: to perform; to make happen
to do [slowly - broken down by syllable]
to do [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: how [natural native speed]
Keith: in what way; the way in which
Sadia: how [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: how [natural native speed]
Next:"
often [natural native speed]
Keith: many times; frequently
often [slowly - broken down by syllable]
often [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: usually [natural native speed]
Keith: normally; commonly
Sadia: usually [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: usually [natural native speed]
Next:"
one, 1 [natural native speed]
Keith: a single unit or thing;
one, 1 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
one, 1 [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: time [natural native speed]
Keith: a moment, hour, day or year
Sadia: time [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: time [natural native speed]
Next:"
per [natural native speed]
Keith: for each
per [slowly - broken down by syllable]
per [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: season [natural native speed]
Keith: a specified period of time
Sadia: season [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: season [natural native speed]
Next:"
what [natural native speed]
Keith: used as an interrogative about the identity, nature, or
value of something
what [slowly - broken down by syllable]
what [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: to be [natural native speed]
Keith: to exist or to exist as
Sadia: to be [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: to be [natural native speed]
Next:"
this [natural native speed]
Keith: the person, thing, or idea that is present or near
this [slowly - broken down by syllable]
this [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: that [natural native speed]
Keith: demonstrative pronoun
Sadia: that [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: that [natural native speed]
Next:"
just [natural native speed]
Keith: exactly, only
just [slowly - broken down by syllable]
just [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: book [natural native speed]
Keith: a bound set of printed sheets
Sadia: book [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: book [natural native speed]
Next:"
to pass [natural native speed]
Keith: to move or proceed
to pass [slowly - broken down by syllable]
to pass [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: here [natural native speed]
Keith: in or at this place
Sadia: here [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: here [natural native speed]
Next:"
you [natural native speed]
Keith: the one(s) being spoken to
you [slowly - broken down by syllable]
you [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: American [natural native speed]
Keith: from America
Sadia: American [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: American [natural native speed]
Next:"
sometimes [natural native speed]
Keith: at times; now and then; occasionally
sometimes [slowly - broken down by syllable]
sometimes [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: always [natural native speed]
Keith: every time
Sadia: always [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: always [natural native speed]
Next:"
to work [natural native speed]
Keith: to be successful; to produce a good result
to work [slowly - broken down by syllable]
to work [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: guaranteed [natural native speed]
Keith: assured; will certainly happen
Sadia: guaranteed [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: guaranteed [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: Alright, Sadia, what’s the first word or phrase we’re going to take a look at?
Sadia: The first word we’ll look at is, “This?” When Zo’s friends demand, they force him, to show the book he’s reading, Zo, he gets really nervous and he says, “This?” In
this case it means, “this thing I have?”
Keith: That's easy enough, right? Next we have, "1 time per season."
Sadia: Zo wants to know how often his new friends go to basketball games?
Keith: And Tom tells Zo that he goes to a basketball game once per season.
Sadia: And, uh, basketball season, it begins in November and lasts through April?
Keith: I'm sure our listeners remember that Zo is visiting New York in April.
Sadia: Next is, "Oh, it's just a..."
Keith: After his colleagues try to get him to show the book, Zo tries to beg them off. He tries to get them to turn their attention to something else.
Sadia: He doesn’t want them to pay any attention to the book. He says, “Oh, it’s just a book,” which means, “It’s just a book, but it’s nothing important.
Keith: And “just” here it’s used to lessen the importance of something.
Sadia: For example, if someone complimented me on my dress or something, I would say, “Oh, it’s just a dress. It’s nothing special.”
Keith: “It’s just” is used to mean, “It’s nothing special.” It’s not special.
Sadia: The next is a pick up line, and I'll leave that to the male to explain! [laughs]
Keith: Well, I’m not an expert, but I’ll try to explain. “Pick up lines” are phrases or maybe sometimes words too, that someone uses to start a conversation with a person they’d like to attract—a person that they are interested in dating.
Sadia: And to do this—to try to start a conversation with someone you’re attracted to—is “to pick someone up.” Although we should note that "picking up" is usually-- but not always-- done by men. And that’s probably a whole separate lesson.
Keith: Another lesson. Yeah.
Keith: The next phrase is “Pass it over.”
Sadia: “Pass it over” is a very informal phrase that means, “hand over what you have,” or “give what you have to me.”
Keith: Our next phrase is, “So, do you come here often?”
Sadia: Ahh. This is a popular example of a really bad pick up line!
Keith: Did you hear this one?
Sadia: Every girl hears it at least once in a lifetime.
Keith: So this is an example of a pickup line you should never use.
Sadia: Exactly. At one point, maybe 20, 30 years ago, it was a perfectly legitimate question. You could ask one, and they would probably answer.
Keith: Yeah-- you're probably right! But since it’s been a long time since that line was invented, that phrase became associated with, uh, or related with, ah, poor attempts at trying to “pick someone up.”
Sadia: And there's another one in the dialogue-- “You must be tired, because you’ve been running through my mind all day!”
Keith: [laughs] I almost forgot about that one! But this phrase is used as a joke— but mainly because the humor...
Sadia: It’s very bad. I mean, it’s an attempt at being funny, but fails. So for this reason, if you’re going to say that and you’re going to try to be serious, it won’t work.
Keith: It might work if you’re trying to be really bad at humor.
Sadia: Uh, that’s true. Like a little reverse...
Keith: Forget it. Don’t take my advice. Our next phrase, Sadia is, "You cheeky guy!"
Sadia: Cheeky is funny, sort of. Alternatives or equivalents of “cheeky” are maybe like “racy,” or “saucy.” It means kind of funny, and it fits perfectly with the next phrase, "You little devil!"
Keith: This is an old-fashioned phrase you can to someone when he or she has done
something daring or unexpected. So Zo's colleagues call Zo "a little devil" because they don't expect Zo to be reading a book about pickup lines.
Sadia: When your friend does something a little risky-- something you weren't expecting from him-- you can call him "a little devil!"
Keith: [laughs] Our next phrase is, "Just kidding."
Sadia: “Just kidding,” means, “I’m not serious.” It’s usually said right after a statement that sounds serious, but isn’t.
Keith: . For example, Friend 1 says, "I don’t think we should be friends any more."
Sadia: And Friend 2 will be shocked and say, "What?!"
Keith: And then Friend 1 will say, "Just kidding!" OK, what's next?
Sadia: Next is, "That works?" This phrase is short for, "Does that work?" Zo says, "That works?" in response to one of the "good" pick up lines that his friends teach him.
Keith: Finally-- last phrase is-- "100% guaranteed."
Sadia: It's used when the probability of an event happening is certain-- when that event will definitely happen.
Keith: 100%. It’s promised. It’s 100 percent guaranteed.

Lesson focus

Sadia: The focus of this lesson is the verb, "to say"--
Keith: Adverbs of frequency--
Sadia: And, "won't." Let's start with the verb, “to say.”
Keith: "To say" means to speak or utter.
Sadia: And it appears a few times throughout the dialogue. After his colleagues make fun of the pickup lines from his book, Zo asks them,
Keith: "Then what do you SAY?"
Sadia: . Another similar phrase would be, "What do you SAY instead?"
Keith: In response, Tom tells Zo, "I sometimes SAY, 'Hi, there. Having a good time?'"
Sadia: And you may notice that this statement also includes an adverb of frequency, which we'll talk about a little bit later in the lesson.
Keith: Tom also says, "I WON'T SAY, 'So, do you come here often?'"
Sadia: He WILL NOT SAY "do you come here often?'"
Keith: And the third colleague shares his experience with, "I always SAY, 'It's nice to see you here.'"
Sadia: If you remember some of our previous lessons, you'll recognize that "SAY" is used in the SIMPLE PRESENT TENSE.
Keith: Right. So let’s review really quickly. The simple present tense is used in four instances, four different situations. The first one is, when the verb is a fact, when it’s general. When the statement of the verb is talking about a fact.
Sadia: Secondly, you use the SIMPLE PRESENT TENSE when the verb happens all the time-- in the past, in the present, and in the future.
Keith: And the third situation when you use the SIMPLE PRESENT TENSE this is when the verb is not only happening now, but other times as well.
Sadia: And finally, you use the SIMPLE PRESENT TENSE when the statement it ALWAYS is happening. It’s always true. Constantly.
Keith: Right. So each of the sentences from the dialogue that use the
verb, "SAY" uses one of these situations.
Sadia: Let's move on to ADVERBS OF FREQUENCY.
Keith: You already know that adverbs modify, or describe, verbs.
Sadia: Adverbs can also express the frequency with which
something is done— They express how often something is done. Adverbs of frequency are used just like any other adverbs—they’re placed just before the main verbs they modify.
Keith: Take note here that when adverbs of frequency, they modify the verb, “to be,” they are placed AFTER the verb. So for example, I am ALWAYS tired.
Sadia: They are NEVER late.
Keith: Or even, She is FREQUENTLY angry.
Sadia: ADVERBS OF FREQUENCY tell us how OFTEN something is done.
Keith: Let’s move on to"won't."
Sadia: “Won’t” is short for, “will not.” It’s informal, but is sometimes used in more formal conversation.
Keith: And it’s used in the same way “don’t” is used - that is the formula, Subject + DON’T/DOESN’T/WON’T + the main verb
Sadia: After reading one of the pickup lines from Zo’s book, the colleague says, “That won’t work!” Which means, “That pickup line won’t work!”
Keith: That + won’t + work! Subject + WON’T + verb.
Sadia: Tom adds, “I won't say, ‘So, do you come here often?’” I + won’t + say + do you come here often?"
Keith: Again, Subject = WON’T + verb + object. "I WON'T say, 'Do you come here often?'" What are some things you WON'T do?
Sadia: Ah, well, that’s all for today. Thanks for listening.
Keith: Thanks, Sadia, for teaching us.
Sadia: No problem.
Keith: Bye-bye.
Sadia: Bye.

5 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍
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EnglishClass101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
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What are some other pick up lines you know (or have tried?!) ;)

EnglishClass101.com
Sunday at 12:20 pm
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Hello @Salivia, @Karim and @Julie,


Thankyou all for your posts! It's great to hear from you :)


@Salivia - Humour is usually met with appreciation in circumstances like these. 😄


@Karim - I'm not sure which sentence you mean, would you mind clarifying? 👍


@Julie - You might hear... "Do you come here often?"


Feel free to ask us any questions you have throughout your studies!


Cheers,

Eva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Julie
Monday at 7:22 pm
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Thanks again.How often do you come do this ?

I heard that. was I wrong?

Karim Golchini
Tuesday at 12:22 am
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It appears CAN word left at first sentences.

Salivia_Baker
Saturday at 8:30 pm
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so, does that mean one cannot joke around on a formal level? Does one always have to be stern and serious?