Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Sadia: Hi there, thanks for tuning in. This is Sadia.
Keith: And I’m Keith. “5 Places You Have to See When in New York”
Sadia: In the last lesson, lesson 18, you learned how to talk about the frequency of actions.
Keith: You also learned about the verb, "to say," adverbs of frequency, and "won't."
Sadia: In this lesson you will learn how to express desire to do something, and about adverbs of probability.
Keith: This conversation takes place outside of Madison Square Garden, the sports famous arena.
Sadia: The conversation is between Zo and his two colleagues.
Keith: Well, let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Zo: Thank you again!
Colleague #1: So Zo, what will you do this weekend?
Zo: I'm not sure. On Saturday and Sunday I'll do a homestay, so I have (3) days. I want to go to the MoMA.
Colleague #1: Oh, the MoMA’s great! Will you go to the Guggenheim?
Zo: Probably. I really want to go.
Colleague #1: And what about the Hamptons?
Zo: Maybe, I want to go there, but I don't know. It's a little far.
Colleague #1: And Coney Island?
Zo: Probably, but I’m not sure
Colleague #3: Oh, St. John the Divine?
Zo: What's that?
Colleague #3: St. John the Divine—it’s a really old, huge cathedral on Amsterdam Avenue in Morningside Heights. Uptown.
Zo: Can you please write down the name?
Keith: One more time, slowly.
Zo: Thank you again!
Colleague #1: So Zo, what will you do this weekend?
Zo: I'm not sure. On Saturday and Sunday I'll do a homestay, so I have (3) days. I want to go to the MoMA.
Colleague #1: Oh, the MoMA’s great! Will you go to the Guggenheim?
Zo: Probably. I really want to go.
Colleague #1: And what about the Hamptons?
Zo: Maybe, I want to go there, but I don't know. It's a little far.
Colleague #1: And Coney Island?
Zo: Probably, but I’m not sure
Colleague #3: Oh, St. John the Divine?
Zo: What's that?
Colleague #3: St. John the Divine—it’s a really old, huge cathedral on Amsterdam Avenue in Morningside Heights. Uptown.
Zo: Can you please write down the name?
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Sadia: Alright, so this is an exciting dialogue! And it makes me want to go on vacation!
Keith: Oh, I agree! Yeah.
Sadia: Zo is sharing his plans for the rest of his trip with his coworkers. And he’s got a pretty full trip he has planned! Not only is he going to do a homestay, but he’s also going to visit a
number of very well known New York sites.
Keith: First they mention the MoMA (which is the Museum of Modern Art), the Guggenheim Museum, and Sadia, where else?
Sadia: They also talk about The Hamptons, and Coney Island, and the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine.
Keith: Wow, I’ve never gone to that one.
Sadia: Oh yeah?
Keith: Well, actually, the museums, they’re very easy to go to.
Sadia: That’s true.
Keith: By the Hamptons and Coney Island, they’re a little farther, so it’s a little difficult to go to.
Sadia: Let’s talk about the MoMA then. The Museum of Modern Art. MoMA, is an art museum that’s on 53rd between 5th and 6th avenues here in Manhattan. The MoMA is said to have one of the biggest and most important collections of modern art in the world.
Keith: That’s why it’s so famous, I think.
Sadia: In addition to art, it also has a really extensive library and a restaurant.
Keith: A restaurant? I’ve never ate at the restaurant.
Sadia: Me neither.
Keith: I'll have to check it out sometime.
Sadia: Next they mention The Guggenheim
Keith: That's the huge, really modern, white
building on 5th Avenue, right?
Sadia: It's really awesome-looking. It’s super modern looking. And it was
designed by the American architect Frank Lloyd Wright.
Keith: And they have a modern art collection, too, right?
Sadia: And they also have like Impressionist art and maybe some Post-Impressionist art. Next is Coney Island!
Keith: Coney Island, it’s a cool place to go to. It’s a classic New York place to go to.
Sadia: Where is it, exactly?
Keith: It's on the southernmost part of Brooklyn. It’s actually pretty far from Manhattan. Maybe it will take about an hour to get there.
Sadia: Oh really?
Keith: It’s kind of far.
Sadia: So, should I check it out you think?
Keith: It’s a nice place for a one day date type thing.
Sadia: Ah, OK Finally-- they talk about The
Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine New York,
which is uptown on Amsterdam Avenue between
110th and 113th, and that’s called "Morningside Heights,"
that neighborhood.
Keith: And that thing is really big.
Sadia: It is! It’s enormous. And from what I understand a lot of tourists go there because it’s one of the largest churches in the world.
Keith: Wow. Really?
Sadia: Yeah. It’s an interesting thing to see, I think..
Keith: Zo has a full trip ahead! He's going to a lot of places.
Sadia: Right, he’s got a lot of plans, and I really wish I could join him!
Keith: Alright, let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
The first word we shall see is:
Sadia: to do [natural native speed]
Keith: to perform; to make happen
Sadia: to do [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: to do [natural native speed]
Next:"
week [natural native speed]
Keith: unit of seven days
week [slowly - broken down by syllable]
week [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: homestay [natural native speed]
Keith: a stay at a residence by a traveler
Sadia: homestay [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: homestay [natural native speed]
Next:"
day [natural native speed]
Keith: the time of light between one night and the next
day [slowly - broken down by syllable]
day [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: to want [natural native speed]
Keith: to wish for
Sadia: to want [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: to want [natural native speed]
Next:"
to go [natural native speed]
Keith: to move or travel to
to go [slowly - broken down by syllable]
to go [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: definitely [natural native speed]
Keith: absolutely, surely, will certainly happen or is certainly
true
Sadia: definitely [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: definitely [natural native speed]
Next:"
probably [natural native speed]
Keith: without much doubt; likely to happen
probably [slowly - broken down by syllable]
probably [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: maybe [natural native speed]
Keith: possibly, but not certainly, perhaps
Sadia: maybe [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: maybe [natural native speed]
Next:"
probably not [natural native speed]
Keith: not likely to happen
probably not [slowly - broken down by syllable]
probably not [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: Alright, Sadia, help us out. What are we first taking a look at?
Sadia: Let’s look at the phrase, "I'm not sure."
Keith: And this is basically the same as, “I don’t know.”
Sadia: The only difference is “I don’t know” means, I don’t really know, and “I’m not sure,” when someone says that, they have some idea.
Keith: They know a little bit I think.
Sadia: Let's look at, "I'll do a homestay." To "do a homestay,” means to participate in a homestay program.
Keith: A “homestay” is a type of study abroad program that lets a foreign visitor to live in a home of a local family and learn local customs and language in a realistic situation.
Sadia: The homestay participant, in this case, Zo, is treated as a member of the family, and sometimes takes part in like the cooking or other household chores. I did a homestay when I was in high school-- and it was probably one of the best experiences of my life.
Keith: Next is, "What about The Hamptons?" Zo's colleague asks Zo if he'll be going to The
Hamptons by asking, "What about The Hamptons?"
Sadia: This phrase is short for the complete thought, "What about the Hamptons? Will you also go to The Hamptons?"
Keith: Tom doesn't express this complete thought because everyone who is part of the conversation, they know what the topic of conversation is--
Sadia: And the topic is where Zo will go during his stay in New York.
Keith: Let's check out, "And Coney Island?"
Sadia: This phrase is short for the complete thought, "And will you go to Coney Island?"
Keith: Our next phrase is?
Sadia: Next is, "Can you please write down the name?"
Keith: When Zo’s colleagues mention St. John the Divine, that’s the church we were talking about, right? He asks them to write it down. He asks, “Can you please write down the name?”
Sadia: He makes this request polite by using the phrase, “Can you please…?” The next phrase is, "Definitely!"
Keith: This has the same meaning and is used in the same way as, “Sure,” “Absolutely,” “Certainly,” and other such one-word, very strong affirmative ideas.
Sadia: Right.
Keith: And the next phrase is, "Probably."
Sadia: “Probably” is used when an event is highly likely—when the chances are good that something will happen.
Keith: There is a chance that the event won’t happen, but the chance is small.
Sadia: What about, "Maybe?"
Keith: “Maybe” is used when some event or some thing could happen or possibly be true.
Sadia: So when his coworkers ask him if he’ll go to The Hamptons, Zo says, “Maybe,” which is the same as, you know, “I’m not sure.”
Keith: Finally, let's look at, "Probably not."
Sadia: "Probably not" is used when the event being talked about is not likely—when the chances of the event happening are low or “slim.”
Keith: So Zo says he “probably won’t” go to Coney Island, which means that the likelihood of him going to Coney Island is not very high—it probably won’t happen.

Lesson focus

Sadia: Alright, the focus points of this lesson are "will," and the Simple Future Tense, the verb, "to want," and Probably/Probably Not/Maybe.
Keith: How about “will”
Sadia: Yes, WILL! AND the simple future tense.
Keith: Let's do it. Zo and his colleagues are talking about Zo’s schedule for the rest of his stay.
Sadia: He explains, “On Saturday and Sunday I'll-- or I WILL-- do a homestay.”
Keith: WILL is in the SIMPLE FUTURE TENSE--
Sadia: Which means it describes the FUTURE-- what someone might do, or say, or what event or events might happen. Let's review the forms of will. Singular.
Keith: I WILL, YOU WILL, HE or SHE WILL.
Sadia: Now plural.
Keith: WE WILL, YOU WILL, THEY WILL.
Sadia: This is the formula for the use of the word, “will”
Keith: Just remember that you can make contractions with “will”— And what that means is you can make it shorter, and that’s used in conversation or informal writing.
Sadia: That's right. In the dialogue, Zo says, “I’ll do a homestay.” “I’ll” is short for, “I will.”
Keith: Let's introduce the contractions for “will." How do we make it shorter?
Sadia: I + will = I’ll. I'll. [spell]
Keith: You + will = you’ll. [spell]
Sadia: He + will = he’ll. [spell]
Keith: We + will = we’ll. [spell]
Sadia: You + will = you’ll. [spell]
Keith: They + will = they’ll. [spell]
Sadia: You can also make interrogative statements—or, questions—using “will.”
Keith: For example, in the dialogue, Zo’s colleague Tom asks, “What will you do this
week?”
Sadia: Questions with “will” are created using this formula... Question word + will + subject + verb + object
Keith: So, in the dialogue - What [question word] + WILL + you + do + this week
Sadia: What will you do this week?
Keith: Tom also asks, “Will you go to The Guggenheim?”
Sadia: WILL + you + go + to + The Guggenheim? Will you go to the Guggenheim?
Let's talk about the verb, "want" now.
Keith: To “want” something is to desire that thing.
Sadia: And to “really want” something is to desire it very much.
Keith: So when Zo’s colleagues ask if he’ll go to the Guggenheim, Zo says he “really wants” to go. And that he’ll “probably” go—which, as you can see in the Vocabulary and Phrases section, that means his going to the Guggenheim is very likely. I WANT, YOU WANT, HE WANTS-- and there's that S on the end of the 3rd person singular.
Sadia: Right.
Keith: WE WANT, YOU WANT, THEY WANT. Sadia, can you help us with some examples?
Sadia: OK. I want to go home. She wants to see a movie. They want to have dinner at our place.
Keith: You can make a sentence that uses the verb, "want" NEGATIVE, by adding don't/doesn't before, "want." So the formula is Subject + DON'T or DOESN'T + WANT + Object.
Sadia: So, “I WANT to go home” becomes “I DON'T WANT to go home.” “She WANTS to see a movie” becomes “She DOESN'T WANT to see a movie.” “They want to have dinner at our place” becomes “They DON'T WANT to have dinner at our place.”
Keith: That’s Subject + Don't or Doesn't + Want + Object.
Sadia: Finally, the last point of this lesson is PROBABLY/PROBABLY NOT/MAYBE.
Keith: These are all ADVERBS OF PROBABILITY.
Sadia: Adverbs of probability express the likelihood of an event.
Keith: In the dialogue. Zo says, "PROBABLY. I really want to go." Which means that it is HIGHLY LIKELY that he will go.
Sadia: And then, when he's asked about Coney Island, Zo says, "Probably not. I want to go, but I PROBABLY WON'T." He probably will not go. It is unlikely that he will go.
Keith: And then, Tom asks Zo about going to the Hamptons, he says, "Maybe, I want to go there, but I don't know. It's a little far." There, the word MAYBE means that it's POSSIBLE but not certain that he will go.
Sadia: Let's review - PROBABLY means that something is LIKELY to happen-- It PROBABLY
WILL happen.
Keith: PROBABLY NOT means that something is UNLIKELY to happen-- it PROBABLY WILL NOT happen. So, is this the last we'll hear about Zo's colleague, Tom?
Sadia: PROBABLY NOT!
Keith: And what about the word MAYBE?
Sadia: MAYBE means that something may or may not happen. The likelihood is uncertain.
Keith: Maybe it'll happen...
Sadia: And, maybe not! So... do you think Zo and Michelle will take their friendship to the "next level?" [laughs]
Keith: ... Maybe. [laughs]

Outro

Keith: OK, well everyone, we’ll probably see you next time.
Sadia: We’ll definitely see you next time. Thanks for listening.
Keith and Sadia: Bye

24 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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To those who have visited the United States - where have you been in the US?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 08:08 PM
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Hello Kirver,


Thanks again for your kind feedback. ❤️️


Please let us know if you ever have any questions throughout your studies, we would be happy to assist.


Until next time,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Kirver Rodriguez
Thursday at 08:30 AM
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😄

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 06:43 PM
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Hello Cesar,


Thanks for getting in touch. 😄


Those two questions indicate the same action - writing a name. "Writing down" indicates a piece of paper will be used to record the name/ it will be recorded in writing.


I hope this is helpful to you. 😄👍


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 06:14 PM
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Hello Marilu and Joo,


Thanks for your kind feedback. ❤️️


@Marilu - Would you like to practice more? 😄


Upgrade to Premium Plus and get personal instructions from one of our English teachers through our My teacher feature!

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Cheers,

Éva

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JOO EON LEE
Friday at 02:53 AM
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EXELLENT LESSON

CESAR MENDIETA
Thursday at 09:15 PM
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Hello everyone.


Please, someone help me, What is the difference between Can you please write the name? and Can you please write down the name?


Thanks

Cesar Mendieta

Marilu Segovia
Wednesday at 11:25 AM
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Will you ever write a book? I am meybe will not write a book.

Will you go on vacation soon? I will probably go on vacation.

Will you keep studying English? I will probably keep studying English.

Marilu Segovia
Wednesday at 11:22 AM
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I am meybe will not write a book.

I will probably go on vacation.

I will probabaly keep studying English.

Marilu Segovia
Wednesday at 11:14 AM
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List five (5) things you DO or DO NOT WANT:

I Want to speak English.

I want to travel.

I want to eat dessert.

I do not want to work.

I want new shoes.

Marilu Segovia
Wednesday at 11:08 AM
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Where will you go weekend?

When will you go to homestay?

When will you visit The MoMa?