Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Sadia: Hi from New York. Thanks for joining us today. This is Sadia.
Keith: And I’m Keith. Welcome to Gengo English Lesson 21 - “Getting the Best Table and Dish in Town”
Sadia: In our last lesson, Lesson 20, you learned how to ask
for permission.
Keith: You also learned about time expressions, the phrase,
"What time do you...?"
Sadia: And the phrase, "Excuse me."
Keith: In this lesson you will learn about eating out, and
getting the table and food that you want.
Sadia: The conversation takes place at a restaurant.
Keith: And this conversation is between Zo and the waiter serving
him.
Sadia: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Clerk #1: Hello, sir, how many?
Zo: One, please.
Clerk #1: Right this way. Here you are.
Zo: Hmm…. Can I sit there instead?
Clerk #1: Sure! What would you like to drink?
Zo: Water, please.
Clerk #1: And what will you be having to eat?
Zo: What do you recommend?
Clerk #1: Definitely the patatak mentaiko—crispy fries with spicy
cod roe mayo.
Zo: I'll have that. Also, what is that—what she’s having?
Clerk #1 Those are kroketas—crispy, creamy croquettes.
Zo: I'll have that, too.
Clerk #1: Yes, sir.
[moments later]
Clerk #1: Is everything all right?
Zo Yes, very nice. Thank you.
Keith: One more time, slowly.
Clerk #1: Hello, sir, how many?
Zo: One, please.
Clerk #1: Right this way. Here you are.
Zo: Hmm…. Can I sit there instead?
Clerk #1: Sure! What would you like to drink?
Zo: Water, please.
Clerk #1: And what will you be having to eat?
Zo: What do you recommend?
Clerk #1: Definitely the patatak mentaiko—crispy fries with spicy
cod roe mayo.
Zo: I'll have that. Also, what is that—what she’s having?
Clerk #1 Those are kroketas—crispy, creamy croquettes.
Zo: I'll have that, too.
Clerk #1: Yes, sir.
[moments later]
Clerk #1: Is everything all right?
Zo Yes, very nice. Thank you.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Sadia: So Zo has gone out for a dinner alone—and
judging from the food he’s ordered, these very exotic sounding foods, he’s at, what sounds like a tapas restaurant!
Keith: Tapas-- that's Spanish, right?
Sadia: Tapas restaurants—sometimes called tapas bars— They’re Spanish, and they serve like wine and small plates of Spanish appetizers.
Keith: it seems like the number of tapas restaurants
in New York has increased over the past few years-- I
mean, I keep hearing about new ones every day..
Sadia: Definitely, I think so. It’s probably because the experience
of having some wine or a drink and tasty bites of really flavorful
food in a really casual place, that’s probably a nice alternative to a big fancy dinner somewhere.
Keith: And in this bad economy, it’s not so good right now, and everyone is looking
for less fussy, less expensive and more practical ways to goout.
Sadia: And as we’ve talked about before,
America—and probably New York in particular—really is a
melting pot. So finding all kinds of ethnic food and
things like that is never a problem!
Keith: There’s always different kinds of ethnic foods. And if you ever visit, no matter
where you're from, you'll probably be able to find a
taste of home right here in Manhattan. And what that means is, a taste of your own country.
Alright, well let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
The first word we shall see is:
Sadia: many [natural native speed]
Keith: consisting of a large amount
Sadia: many [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: many [natural native speed]
Next:"
smoking [natural native speed]
Keith: the area in a restaurant where smoking is allowed
smoking [slowly - broken down by syllable]
smoking [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: non-smoking [natural native speed]
Keith: the area in a restaurant where smoking is not allowed
Sadia: non-smoking [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: non-smoking [natural native speed]
Next:"
to sit [natural native speed]
Keith: to have a seat
to sit [slowly - broken down by syllable]
to sit [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: to recommend [natural native speed]
Keith: to endorse, to speak well of, to suggest
Sadia: to recommend [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: to recommend [natural native speed]
Next:"
also [natural native speed]
Keith: in addition; besides; too
also [slowly - broken down by syllable]
also [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: all right [natural native speed]
Keith: okay; to one's liking; acceptable
Sadia: all right [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: all right [natural native speed]
Next:"
very [natural native speed]
Keith: to a high degree, truly
very [slowly - broken down by syllable]
very [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: Let’s take a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Sadia: The first phrase we’ll look at is, “How many?”
Keith: This is a commonly used phrase in restaurants.
Sadia: And it’s short for, “How many people are in your party?” Or, “How many people will be
dining?
Keith: Next is, “Smoking or non-smoking?”
Sadia: Another restaurant phrase.
Keith: Yep. It’s short for, “Would you like to sit in the smoking section or the non-smoking section?”
Sadia: In America, though, it’s becoming I think increasingly common for state governments to ban smoking in public places—
Keith: Recently, a lot of places in America, not just in New York, you just can’t smoke inside.
Sadia: Might take some getting used to for all of our smoking listeners. Next is, “What would you like to drink?”
Keith: This phrase is ALWAYS, always used at restaurants.
Sadia: Yes. After you place your food order with the waiter or waitress, he or she will ask, “What would you like to drink?” What's the next phrase, Keith?
Keith: The next phrase is, “And what will you be having to eat?”
Sadia: After Zo requests water, the waiter asks, “And what will you be having to eat?”
Keith: He’d like to know what food Zo would like to order.
Sadia: Some other ways of saying, "And what will you be having to eat?" are, maybe “What can I get you?” “May I interest you in some of the food items?”
Keith: Or also you can say, “Would you like anything to eat?”
Sadia: Next is, “I'll have that.” The waiter suggests some things that he thinks Zo will like, so
Zo says, “I’ll have that.” Which means, “Okay. I’ll have what you just described.”
Keith: Zo approves of the waiter’s selection and he would like to try it.The next phrase is, “I'll also have that.”
Sadia: So, after approving the waiter’s suggestion, Zo asks about what the woman next to him is having.
Keith: Yeah, the waiter describes the food and Zo says, “I’ll also have that.”
Sadia: Which means, “I’ll also have that food that she’s having.
Keith: OK, next up, “Is everything alright?”
Sadia: Good waiters and waitresses always ask at some point during your meal, “Is everything alright?”
Keith: So you’re eating, and maybe 10 minutes have passed, and maybe they’ll say, “Is everything alright?” “Is everything OK?” Our final phrase, Very nice.
Sadia: This phrase shows very enthusiastic approval or agreement. It’s strong.
Keith: The waiter asks Zo if everything is alright, and
Zo says, “Yes—very nice.”
Sadia: Zo is giving his approval— is very happy with his experience at the restaurant.

Lesson focus

Sadia: The focus points of this lesson are requesting something using the phrase, "Can I?" and Asking, "What do you recommend?"
Keith: How about we start with
REQUESTING SOMETHING USING, "CAN I?"
Sadia: OK. Go ahead.
Keith: Alright, Zo arrives at the restaurant and is shown to his table by the restaurant host. Zo would prefer, he wants to sit at another table, so he asks, “Can I sit there instead?”
Sadia: . He makes a request using the phrase, “Can I…?”
Keith: "Can I sit there instead?" What are some other examples of making a request using, "Can I...?" something afterward...
Sadia: Can I have another glass of water? Or, Can I see the dessert menu?
Keith: You could also say, Can I see the wine list? Or, Can I have an extra plate?
Sadia: Now, Zo could have also said, “MAY I sit there instead?” Which brings us to this point - making a request with, “can” was actually considered to be incorrect. But recently, using “can I…” is normal and accepted.
Keith: In school actually, we learned that “May I” is correct, but I think recently you said that “Can I” is now correct. Using “may," however, does make your request more formal— It makes it a little more polite.
Sadia: Sure. So, MAY I have another glass of water? or MAY I see the dessert menu?
Keith: MAY I see the wine list? MAY I have an extra plate?
Sadia: If you are writing, which requires more formal English, you should research the difference between “can” and “may.” In short, “can” is used to express ability--
Keith: That's right. And “may” is used to express permission or possibility.
Sadia: But from now on, you can make simple requests by asking, "Can I...?”
Keith: And what about ASKING, "WHAT DO YOU
RECOMMEND?"
Sadia: OK. When the waiter asks Zo what he would like to eat, Zo asks, “What do you recommend?” And this phrase is the same as, “What do you suggest?”
Keith: Zo is asking the waiter to make a suggestion. But why?
Sadia: Well, the waiter has a better idea of what’s available and he’s probably tasted all of the food—the waiter has an informed opinion. He knows what they have.
Keith: And of course Zo is visiting the restaurant for the first time, and he has no idea, so of course the waiter knows better than Zo. So the next time if you’re dining out and you can’t decide what to order, ask your server, your waiter or waitress, for a recommendation—say, “What do you recommend?” And Sadia, I think this will be useful for you.
Sadia: Yeah, probably because I can never decide. I do ask often. And usually I find that the waiter or waitress is more than happy to make a suggestion.
Keith: And you can also use the phrase, “What do you recommend?” when you’re shopping. For example, you’re shopping for something expensive, like a computer or a camera, you can ask the salesperson what he or she “recommends.”
Sadia: That’s true. And while suggestions from salespeople are not always reliable, you can’t always trust them because sometimes they’re just wanting you to buy the most expensive thing. But you might receive some pretty important information anyway.
Keith: Probably some information that may help you decide which computer or television you should buy.
Sadia: So don't be afraid to ask for a suggestion using, "What do you recommend?"
Keith: Alright, well that’s going to do it for this lesson. Thanks for listening.
Sadia: See you next time.
Keith: Bye.

6 Comments

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EnglishClass101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
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Do you ask for recommendations when you go out to eat? :)

EnglishClass101.com
Friday at 7:37 am
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Hello there @Unagi,


Thankyou for your post! I just looked up the word 'mentaiko' and it is actually Japanese.


Please feel free to ask us any questions regarding your English studies.


Cheers,

Eva

Team EnglishClass101.com

unagi
Thursday at 5:11 pm
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Is mentaiko Spanish?

I think It's Japanese.

architettomichelotti9853
Tuesday at 6:25 am
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Thank you Jessi

I wish to be as much polite as I can... :-D

So let me ask you: WHAT WILL YOU BE HAVING TO DRINK?


:mrgreen::mrgreen::mrgreen::mrgreen:



see ya

bye

Team EnglishClass101.com
Monday at 12:00 pm
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Hi architettomichelotti,

There is no difference in meaning between "What will you be having to eat?" and "What will you have to eat?" Both are correct, and are used.

However, I would say that "What will you be having to eat?" sounds slightly more polite to my ear :D


Jessi

Team EnglishClass101.com

architettomichelotti9853
Sunday at 6:27 pm
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hello everybody

I'm not confident with the future continous tense yet.... :-(

the waitress asks: WHAT WILL YOU BE HAVING TO EAT?

Why?


Could she ask: WHAT WILL YOU HAVE TO EAT?

Is this wrong?


If not what's the difference between them?

Thanks in advance.