Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Sadia: Hi, thanks for joining us today. This is Sadia.
Keith: And I’m Keith. Welcome to Gengo English Lesson 22 - “You Paid What?! The Best Place to Shop in America”
Sadia: In our last lesson, Lesson 21, you learned how to get
the food and table you want at a restaurant.
Keith: And you also learned about requesting something using the
phrase, "Can I...?"
Sadia: And about asking the question, "What do you
recommend?"
Keith: In this lesson you will learn how to shop at a market or
street fair.
Sadia: This conversation takes place outside, at a
street festival.
Keith: And this conversation is between, of course, Zo,
and some food vendors, or people who sell food.
Sadia: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
(Street festival ambience)
Clerk #1: I got popcorn here—get your popcorn!
Clerk #2: Cotton candy! Cotton candy here!
Zo: Excuse me, what are these?
Clerk #3: Oh—these are funnel cakes. Very delicious!
Zo: What's in it?
Clerk #3: There’s some flour, a little egg, butter, and sugar—a lot
of sugar!
Zo: How much are they?
Clerk #3: $3.
Zo: And those there...what are they?
Clerk #3: Those are corn dogs. They cost $2 each.
Zo: I'll take 1 of each.
Clerk #3: Here you are. That'll be $5.
Zo: Here is $20.
Clerk #3: Do you have a smaller bill?
Zo: Sorry, I don’t.
Clerk #3: Okay. No problem. Here's your change.
Zo: Thanks!
Keith: One more time, slowly.
Clerk #1: I got popcorn here—get your popcorn!
Clerk #2: Cotton candy! Cotton candy here!
Zo: Excuse me, what are these?
Clerk #3: Oh—these are funnel cakes. Very delicious!
Zo: What's in it?
Clerk #3: There’s some flour, a little egg, butter, and sugar—a lot
of sugar!
Zo: How much are they?
Clerk #3: $3.
Zo: And those there...what are they?
Clerk #3: Those are corn dogs. They cost $2 each.
Zo: I'll take 1 of each.
Clerk #3: Here you are. That'll be $5.
Zo: Here is $20.
Clerk #3: Do you have a smaller bill?
Zo: Sorry, I don’t.
Clerk #3: Okay. No problem. Here's your change.
Zo: Thanks!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Sadia: Alright, so it sounds like Zo is at a street fair! I love street fairs!
They're usually held on the main street of a
neighborhood, typically during the spring and
summer months.
Keith: Street fairs are a common event thoughout the US,
wouldn't you say, wouldn’t you say, Sadia?
Sadia: Yeah, definitely.
Keith: And each one usually expresses the character of the
neighborhood it's held in.
Sadia: That’s true. Sometimes street fairs are held in celebration of a holiday, the 4th of July, for example, but not always.
Keith: Well, in this dialogue, Zo is talking with some of the food vendors, the people selling the food.
Sadia: And the dialogue opens with some of these food vendors, their sales calls.
Keith: The sales calls are funny, actually. And a lot of cotton candy vendors, they shout, “Cotton candy! Get your cotton candy here!” You’ll hear these kinds of calls if you go to an American street fair. There’s usually many, many food vendors.
Sadia: They all work pretty hard to get your attention, and hopefully to get you to buy what they’re selling.
Keith: Definitely Alright, let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
The first word we shall see is:
Sadia: each [natural native speed]
Keith: a piece
Sadia: each [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: each [natural native speed]
Next:"
credit card [natural native speed]
Keith: a card used to purchase things on credit
credit card [slowly - broken down by syllable]
credit card [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: popcorn [natural native speed]
Keith: cooked (popped) corn kernels
Sadia: popcorn [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: popcorn [natural native speed]
Next:"
cotton candy [natural native speed]
Keith: a candy made of spun sugar
cotton candy [slowly - broken down by syllable]
cotton candy [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: flour [natural native speed]
Keith: soft, powdered wheat used in cooking or baking
Sadia: flour [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: flour [natural native speed]
Next:"
change [natural native speed]
Keith: money returned when a payment exceeds the amount
due
change [slowly - broken down by syllable]
change [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: bill [natural native speed]
Keith: a piece of paper money
Sadia: bill [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: bill [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: Alright, well let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Sadia: The first phrase we’ll look at is, “I got popcorn here—get your popcorn!”
Keith: Sadia, you sound so familiar. This is a phrase usually heard at an outdoor
festival or an outdoor fair. It’s shouted really loud by food vendors who are selling popcorn.
Sadia: And vendors selling other kinds of food also use this phrase; so you might hear, “Ice cream here—I got your ice cream. Get your ice cream here!” or something similar to that.
Keith: Something similar to that is also “Cotton candy! Cotton candy here!”
Sadia: Next is, the phrase, “What's in it?”
Keith: When Zo hears about the funnel cake (which is a fried pastry sprinkled with powdered sugar), Zo asks, “What’s in it?” What’s in the funnel cake?
Sadia: This phrase “What’s in it?” is an informal version of, “What’s this food made of?” You can use this phrase “What’s in it?” when you’d like to know what a food is made of—what ingredients were used to make it.
Keith: Next is, “I'll take” or “I'll have”...
Sadia: So the phrase, “I’ll take…” or, “I’ll have…” is often used when purchasing something. They mean, “I would like to buy…”
Keith: That's right. In the dialogue, Zo says, “I’ll have one of each,” and this means that he’d like to buy one of each item the sales person tells him about—
Sadia: One funnel cake and one corn dog.
Keith: Next is, “something smaller.”
Sadia: When you pay for something with cash and the cashier asks you if you have “smaller bills,” or “something smaller,” they’re asking you for dollar bills smaller than the one you’re giving; so if you’re giving a $20, the cashier would probably like a $10 bill or $5 bill.
Keith: Right-- and If you give a $10 bill and the cashier is asking if you have “something smaller,” the cashier probably wants a $5 bill or a $1 bill.
Sadia: Which brings us to the phrase, "big bills." What's that mean?
Keith: The phrase “big bills” generally refers to $20 bills, $50 bills, and $100 bills.
Sadia: Right, and then “small bills,” they would refer to $10s, $5s, and $1s, right?
Keith: Yeah, that's right.

Lesson focus

Sadia: The focus points of this lesson are Plural Demonstrative Pronouns and
Keith: Asking for Something Using, "Do You Have...? Okay. Plural demonstrative pronouns. That’s pretty long. What are they?
Sadia: Our listeners may remember from previous lessons that demonstrative pronouns are used to point to particular nouns.
Keith: THIS lesson-- THIS is a demonstrative!-- This lesson focuses on the plural demonstratives, “these” and “those.”
Sadia: Nouns that are close to the speaker are referred to as “these.” So when Zo approaches the food vendor selling funnel cakes, he asks, “Excuse me, what are these?”
Keith: Even though we can’t see the action, we can imagine Zo pointing to the nearby funnel cakes.
Sadia: Let's talk about nouns that are FAR AWAY from the speaker.
Keith: Nouns that are far away from the speaker are referred to as “those.”
Sadia: So when Zo approaches the vendor selling corn dogs, he asks, “And those, those over there—what are they?”
Keith: Again, we can’t see the action, we can’t see it, but we can
imagine Zo pointing to the corn dogs, and I think they’re far away—
Sadia: Right. Maybe they're behind the counter or something. Let's do some sample sentences that use plural demonstrative pronouns. Can you start?
Keith: Sure. Whose books are THESE on my desk?
Sadia: Ooh, bot mine! Whose books are THESE on my desk, he’s asking. So a question to our listeners, Are the books near or far from Keith? If you guessed that the books are NEAR to Keith, you're right! Here's another sample sentence - What are those buildings over there?
Keith: Another question to our listeners, Are the buildings near to or far from the speaker?
Sadia: If you guessed that the buildings are far away from me, you're correct!
Keith: So remember, plural demonstrative pronouns, that’s THESE AND THOSE
Sadia: THESE is a PLURAL demonstrative that refers to things that are CLOSE to the speaker.
Keith: And THOSE is a PLURAL demonstrative that refers to things that are far from the speaker.
Sadia: Now let's talk about asking for something using the phrase, "Do you have...?"
Keith: When Zo gives the food vendor his $20 bill, the vendor asks, “Do you have a smaller bill?” He’d like to know if Zo has a $10 or even $5 bill.
Sadia: The vendor is probably is running low on change and, ah, is trying to get some more change from new customers.
Keith: Yeah, that’s a good point. If Zo did have smaller bills, he’d help the food vendor by making it easier for the vendor to give change to other customers.
Sadia: That's right. So, you can ask someone for something using the phrase, “Do you have…?”
Keith: Ask someone for something using the phrase, "Do you have...?"
Sadia: What else could Zo have asked the food vendor?
Keith: Well, he could have also asked, Do you have soft drinks?
Sadia: Or how about, Do you have any napkins?
Keith: Or maybe even, Do you have a bag for the corn dog?
[laughs]
Sadia: Do you have a fork?
Keith: And actually, you can make your “Do you have…?” request more polite by beginning with “Excuse me…”
Sadia: So Excuse me, do you have any soft drinks?
Keith: You can also say, Excuse me, do you have any napkins?
Sadia: You should also know though that “Do you have…?” can also be used to ask someone if they possess or own something.
Keith: Do you have any brothers or sisters?
Sadia: That's right! Or, do you have a car? DO YOU HAVE -It’s a really useful phrase that works well when you’re asking someone for something
Keith: or asking if someone has something, if they possess something!
Sadia: Anything else we should talk about, Keith?
Keith: Actually, I think that was a lot of good information. I think we’re done. Alright, well that just about does it.
Sadia: Thanks for listening. Buh-bye.
Keith: Bye.

4 Comments

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EnglishClass101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
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Hi everyone!

Which snacks sound good to you? Which ones do you want to try?

jason
Friday at 2:31 pm
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In America ,it's easy to eat too much sugar from snack.

EnglishClass101.com
Monday at 7:37 am
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Hello Kevin,


Thanks for your comment and question. 😁


The prices of the snacks in this lesson are accurate, although the salary of $25,000 a month in America is very unrealistic. The

average wage would be around $32,000 per year.


Feel free to shoot through any other questions you have throughout your studies.


Cheers,

Eva

Team EnglishClass101.com

kevin
Monday at 6:12 pm
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are the price of snacks presented in this lesson true? they are real cheap. if one person get a salary of $25,000 a month in America, he will have a strong purchasing power.

right?