Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Sadia: Hey everyone! Thanks for listening. This is Sadia.
Keith: And I’m Keith. Welcome to Gengo English, Lesson 30 - Where Does Your English Go From Here?
Sadia: In our last lesson, you learned how to leave a message and navigate voice mail.
Keith: And we also reviewed the present progressive tense.
Sadia: As well as the simple past tense.
Keith: In this lesson you’ll learn how to give a good
reason.
Sadia: This conversation takes place at the hotel front desk on Zo’s last day In America.
Keith: And the conversation is between Zo,
and the hotel front desk worker. Let’s listen in to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Front desk worker: Good morning, Mr. Viljoen.
Zo: Good morning! Checkout, please!
Front desk worker: Yes, sir. Also, you have some messages.
Zo: Oh, thank you.
Front desk worker: What's wrong?
Zo: I don't want to leave.
Front desk worker: So why leave?
Zo: Well...because I have work. And because I live in
South Africa.
Front desk worker: That's a good reason. Hmmm...can you work here in
the US? And live here?
Zo: Hmm, well maybe I can. That’s a good idea, I’ll have to think about it. Thanks
for everything.
Keith: One more time, slowly.
Front desk worker: Good morning, Mr. Viljoen.
Zo: Good morning! Checkout, please!
Front desk worker: Yes, sir. Also, you have some messages.
Zo: Oh, thank you.
Front desk worker: What's wrong?
Zo: I don't want to leave.
Front desk worker: So why leave?
Zo: Well...because I have work. And because I live in South Africa.
Front desk worker: That's a good reason. Hmmm...can you work here in the US? And live here?
Zo: Hmm, well maybe I can. That’s a good idea, I’ll have to think about it. Thanks for everything.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Keith: In this dialogue, Zo’s preparing to return to his home in South Africa, but he doesn’t seem happy to get back to his life.
Sadia: Aww I know, he sounds so pathetic. But the front desk worker’s pretty cool, right?
Keith: Yeah, the front desk worker suggests that if Zo doesn’t want to leave, he shouldn’t!
Sadia: The worker suggests that Zo considers moving to and working in New York. Zo hadn’t thought about this before, but...
Keith: Maybe! And the front desk worker seems to have been able to inspire Zo to think differently. Maybe he’ll move to New York after all.
Sadia: Maybe so! Listeners, if you were Zo, would you move to New York?
VOCAB LIST
Keith Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Sadia maybe [natural native speed]
Keith possibly, but not certainly, perhaps
Sadia maybe [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia maybe [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: reason [natural native speed]
Keith fact that explains why something is
Sadia: reason [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: reason [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia some [natural native speed]
Keith a small number or amount
Sadia some [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia some [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: to want [natural native speed]
Keith to wish for
Sadia: to want [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: to want [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia wrong [natural native speed]
Keith not correct; unpleasant or bad
Sadia wrong [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia wrong [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: All right Sadia, let’s take a deeper look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Sadia: Okay. The first phrase we’ll look at is “Checkout, please.” Zo approaches the hotel front desk and says, “Checkout, please.”
Keith: This phrase is a short version of the sentence, “I’d like to check out, please.”
Sadia: And to check out of a hotel means to let the hotel know that you are ending your stay, to pay your hotel fees, and to return the room keys.
Keith: Next is, “What’s wrong?” The hotel front desk worker, “What’s wrong?” The worker can sense, he can feel, that Zo isn’t feeling very well and would like to know what’s wrong, or unpleasant, for Zo.
Sadia: That’s right. Ask “What’s wrong,” when you can sense that someone you’re either friendly with or know very well appears to not be feeling well. “What’s wrong?” is a friendly expression that gives the person you are talking to the feeling that you care about him or her and would like to help them feel better. What’s the next phrase?
Keith: The next phrase is, “To live in.” Zo tells the front desk worker that he can’t stay in New York because he lives in South Africa.
Sadia: This means that his home is in South Africa. His life is in South Africa. So staying in America is not really realistic for him. Our last phrase is, “Maybe I can.” The front desk worker suggests to Zo that he could work in America.
Keith: And to show that he will give the idea some thought, Zo says, “Maybe I can.”
Sadia: It’s a short version of the phrase, “That’s a good idea. Maybe I can do it.”

Lesson focus

Sadia: The focus points of this lesson are the phrase, “don’t want to”, giving a reason,
Keith: And asking questions using “can.” Let’s go ahead and start with “Don’t want to.”
Sadia: OK. The front desk worker notices that Zo is not feeling so well and asks what’s wrong. In response, Zo says, “I don’t want to leave.”
Keith: Of course, “don’t” is a contraction or a short form of “do not.” “Do not” is the present, simple negative form of the verb, “to do.”
Sadia: That’s right. And using the present, simple, negative form of the verb “to do” to express something that you do not want is easy. OK, it’s just Subject + Do Not + Want + the infinitive, or the “to” form of the verb.
Keith: Some examples. She + does not + want + to come + with us. She doesn’t want to come with us.
Sadia: And They + do not + want + to have dinner.. They don’t want to have dinner.
Keith: So basically, it’s Subject + Do Not + Want + the infinitive.
Sadia: Mm-hm. The infinitive is the “to” form of the verb. I do not. You do not. He, she, or it does not.
Keith: And the plural, We do not. You do not. They do not.
Sadia: Zo does not want to go back home.
Keith: And Zo does not want to leave New York.
Sadia: Poor thing. And let’s move on to giving a reason.
Keith: Whenever the question “Why” is asked, a typical, a usual response for conversation or informal English would begin with the word “because,” which means, “for that reason.”
Sadia: In the dialogue, the front desk worker asks Zo, “So why leave?” The worker wants to know why Zo is leaving New York if he doesn’t want to.
Keith: And Zo says, “Because I have work. And because I live in South Africa.”
Sadia: What Zo is really saying is that he can’t stay in New York for the reason that he has to work and live in South Africa. Let’s give some more examples. Why can’t you come to dinner tonight, Keith?
Keith: Because I have a lot of work to finish and I have to do laundry.
Sadia: How about, Why don’t you want to come in early?
Keith: Because I know I’ll be awake until late tonight.
Sadia: You should know, listeners, that these responses are only used in conversation. Technically, you can only begin a sentence with “because,” which is a conjunction, when the sentence opens with a dependent clause and ends with an independent clause.
Keith: So if you think back to your early studies of English, you may remember studying independent and dependent clauses.
Sadia: An independent clause is a group of words that can stand on its own as a sentence.
Keith: And a dependent clause is a group of words that cannot stand alone as a sentence.
Sadia: A dependent clause contains a subject and a predicate, but it sounds incomplete on its own.
Keith: And spotting dependent clauses, that’s easy. They begin with either a conjunction or a relative pronoun.
Sadia: So the technically correct of the sentences we gave you, the versions we gave you are, “Because I have a lot of work to finish and I have to do laundry, I can’t come to dinner tonight.
Keith: “Because I have a lot of work to finish and I have to do laundry” is dependent clause.
Sadia: And “I can’t come to dinner tonight” is an independent clause.
Keith: “Because I have a lot of work to finish and I have to do laundry, I can’t come to dinner tonight,” is what you’d write.
Sadia: But in conversation I’d ask, “Why can’t you come to dinner tonight?
Keith: And I could say, in conversation, “Because I have a lot of work to finish and I have to do laundry.”
Sadia: Giving a reason in a conversation is quite easy. Just open with “because” and state your reason. Now let’s talk about questions using “can.” The word “can” shows ability. To say you can do something means you are able to do that thing.
Keith: In the dialogue, the front desk worker says, “Zo, can you work here in the States?” This is the same as, “Are you able to work here in the U.S.?”
Sadia: Or more casually, “Is working in the States a possibility?”
Keith: To ask someone if they can do something is to ask if they are able or if something is possible. Ask questions with “can” by using this simple formula.
Sadia: Can + Subject + Simple Present Tense Verb + Object.
Keith: Can you speak Spanish?
Sadia: To which I’d answer, “No, I can’t.” And I could ask you for example, “Can you write your name in Arabic?”
Keith: And I would answer, “No, I can’t.”
Sadia: Man, can we do anything?
Keith: Yes, of course we can!
Sadia: What can you do, listeners? Let us know, within reason. And ask around. Ask others what they can do.
Keith: Well, that’s going to do it. Thanks for listening. Bye-bye, everyone.
Sadia: Bye-bye. Thanks for listening.

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EnglishClass101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
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This lesson wraps up the Gengo English series! How did you enjoy this series? :mrgreen:

EnglishClass101.comVerified
Thursday at 5:09 pm
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Dear Haitham,

"to well up with tears" means that water is building up in the eyes ready to cry (but not yet crying as the tears have not yet rolled down the cheeks! "To hang up" means to hang up the telephone (end the phoncall) and "the tears flow" is an equivalent phrase for "to cry". "As you blow your nose" means while the other person is blowing their nose (due to the nose running, due to a cold, or presumably, given the context, due to crying.

Hope this helps!

Thanks!

Kind regards,

Gabriella

Team EnglishClass101.com

Haitham
Tuesday at 8:49 am
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Hello,

first of all thanks for help in this series of learn English lessons , second i have question ,

the first one "your eyes well up with tears" could you explain this sentence please,

another sentence "When you hang up, the tears flow" ,

and finally "As you blow your nose "

thanks for every things.

Team EnglishClass101.com
Thursday at 11:23 am
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Hi architettomichelotti,

The next recommended step is Lower Intermediate Season 1 :)


Jessi

Team EnglishClass101.com

architettomichelotti9853
Wednesday at 8:54 am
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Hi everybody

what's the next step?

Intermediate season 1 or Lower Intermediate season 1?

cheers

EnglishClass101.comVerified
Friday at 7:37 pm
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Hi Alem,


We're sorry that you couldn't get the answers back from us. Could you let us know how we may help you?


Thank you,


Jae

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Alem
Friday at 12:36 pm
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I did so many time no answer wat can I do

Alem
Friday at 12:35 pm
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Ples help me

EnglishClass101.comVerified
Tuesday at 12:53 pm
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Hello Alem,


Could you please send an e-mail to contactus@englishclass101.com. Please also mention your 'Username' in the mail. Our technical team will check and get back to you soon.


Regards,

Neha

Team EnglishClass101.com

Alem
Monday at 12:17 am
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Hi I need help pals

Alem
Monday at 12:17 am
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:lol: