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Hi, everybody. My name is Alisha. Welcome back to Know Your Verbs. In this episode, we're going to talk about the verb, "use." Let's get started.
The basic definition of the verb, "to use," is to put something to a purpose. Examples, "We used our iPhones to make a video." "Use your time wisely."
Let's look at the conjugations for this verb. Present, use, uses. Past, used. Past participle, used. Progressive, using.
Let's talk about some additional meanings for this verb.
The first additional meaning for the verb, "use," is to consume. Like, for example, eating or taking all of something and applying it so that all of it goes away. You're consuming it somehow. Examples, "You used all the butter?" "We've used almost all the toilet paper." So, here, these are items which we can gradually get rid of. Like, in the case of butter in the first example, we eat butter and so we consume it by eating, so it goes away. Toilet paper, we use for cleaning purposes and so gradually it goes away. We consume it. But, we use the word, "used," instead.
Okay. Let's go on to these second additional meaning. The second one is a slang term which means to take drugs, as like a habit. Examples of this use, "I heard he's using again." "They haven't used in years." So, here, you don't hear any "drug." There's no word, "drug," being used, or no specific drug name. But, we use the verb, "use" to refer to taking drugs. So, when someone says "he's using again," it means he's using drugs, again. But, saying "drugs" is quite direct and kind of strong, so instead, we say "using" alone. We don't specifically say what he is using, but it refers to drugs. So, this use of the word "use" refers to drug use, actually.
Okay. The third additional meaning of the verb, "use," is to exploit a person or to exploit a situation. Exploit means to take advantage of someone or to take advantage of a situation. Examples, "He's just using you for money." "Don't let them use you for your ideas." So, in both of these example sentences, "use" refers to someone being taken advantage of for a different reason. So, in the first example sentence, "He's just using you for money," it means the "he" in the situation is taking advantage of the listener because he wants money from the listener. So, he's taking advantage of the listener and getting money. In the second example sentence, it's the person's ideas. So, one person has a lot of ideas and a group of people are taking those ideas from the other person. So, taking advantage of someone or taking advantage of a situation. It has a negative image.
Let's move on to some variations of this verb.
The first expression is "could use" something. It means that that thing might be useful in some way, it might be a good idea in some way. Examples, "I could use a break." "You look like you could use a vacation." So, these just mean that the item talked about seems like it could be useful, or might be useful. So, in the first example sentence, "I could use a break," we see "could." That is actually used in the second example sentence too. "I could use a break," meaning it would be possible for me to use a break. Like, that seems like a good idea to me right now. In the second example sentence, "You look like you could use a vacation," it means it seems, based on your appearance, you need a vacation. It would be useful for you to have a vacation. So, "could use something" means it seems like that thing might be good for you. So, this expression is used in positive statements. You look like you could use something. It means that thing might be useful for you or it might be a good idea for you.
Okay. Let's move along to the second variation which is "to use up." So, this means to consume completely. In the alternate definitions for this verb, we saw it means to consume. "To use" means to consume. But, to consume completely, we use the word, "use up," to refer to this. Examples, "She used up all of her sunblock at the beach." "We used up all the wood for the fire." So, here you'll see in both of these example sentences, I included the word, "all." She used up all of her sunblock at the beach. We used up all the wood for the fire. So, "all" shows everything, completely consuming that thing. So, when you want to talk about using everything, you can "use up." She used up all her sunblock. We used up all the wood. You can also exchange verbs here. Like, for example, "We drank up all the wine," or, "We drank up all the beer," or, "We ate up all the pizza." You can use it in a couple of other situations relating to consumption too. But, "use up" is used for like resources of some kind.
So, those are a few, hopefully, new ways for you to use the word, "use." I hope that you found something new. Of course, if you know a different way to use this verb or if you have any questions or comments, please feel free to let us know in the comment section of this video.
Thanks very much for watching this episode of Know Your Verb and we'll see you again soon. Bye-bye.
Use the Force.
Use the Force.
That's, obviously, the best example sentence from this lesson.

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๐Ÿ˜„ ๐Ÿ˜ž ๐Ÿ˜ณ ๐Ÿ˜ ๐Ÿ˜’ ๐Ÿ˜Ž ๐Ÿ˜  ๐Ÿ˜† ๐Ÿ˜… ๐Ÿ˜œ ๐Ÿ˜‰ ๐Ÿ˜ญ ๐Ÿ˜‡ ๐Ÿ˜ด ๐Ÿ˜ฎ ๐Ÿ˜ˆ โค๏ธ๏ธ ๐Ÿ‘

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 06:30 PM
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Can you make a sentence using the verb "Use"?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 04:04 PM
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Hi there Cris,


Thanks again for writing. Yes, that's correct!


Please feel free to shoot through any questions you have throughout your studies.


Sincerely,

ร‰va

Team EnglishClass101.com

cris
Monday at 11:38 AM
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I used up all my money this month


is that correct ?

EnglishClass101.com
Tuesday at 08:06 PM
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Hello Pouya,


Thank you all for your positive feedback!


It's always great to hear from our students.


Feel free to shoot through any questions you have throughout your studies.


Cheers,

ร‰va

Team EnglishClass101.com

Pouya
Friday at 08:26 PM
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It's a useful grammar.