Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Braden: In this lesson, you’ll learn about Have vs. Have got and Negotiation.
Barbara: This conversation takes place in the afternoon on the showroom floor.
Braden: And it’s between Mitch and a potential customer.
Barbara: Mitch is a salesman desperate for a sale so he’ll be using causal language to convince his prospect to purchase.
Braden: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Mitch: I see you're in the market for a new TV.
Customer: Yeah.
Mitch: Are you shopping for your mother?
Customer: What? No. It's for me.
Mitch: Okay. So you'll be wanting the complete entertainment experience. (moving to a different TV) This is the TV you've got to have.
Customer: Hey, I'd like to have it, but I can't afford this one.
Mitch: You see, I've got one of these at home, and let me tell you, it's amazing.
Customer: That's great, but I still can't afford it.
Mitch: Well then, let's try another angle. How about you make me an offer?
Customer: Okay. Well, for me to buy that TV, you've got to shave 300 bucks off that price.
Mitch: Sold!
Customer: Really?
Mitch: Here's the ticket. Just take it up to the desk and they'll put it in your car for you.
June: You have got to be the worst salesman this store has ever seen.
Mitch: I'll take that as a compliment.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: So, we wanted to talk a little bit about Negotiation.
Barbara: Negotiation is defined as a dialogue between two or more individuals or parties, with the intent of reaching an understanding, resolving a point of difference, or gaining some advantage in the outcome of the dialogue.
Braden: Negotiations can also be used to produce an agreement upon a course of action, to bargain for individual or collective advantage, or to craft outcomes to satisfy various interests of the parties involved.
Barbara: In the dialogue, Mitch is trying to sell a television to a new customer. The customer has a limited budget and is looking at a TV that will fit within their budget. Mitch negotiates the customer into buying a more expensive TV by lowering the price.
Braden: This backfires, however, as we'll see in the next lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is:
Barbara: market [natural native speed]
Braden: an area where commercial dealings are conducted
Barbara: market [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: market [natural native speed]
Next:
complete [natural native speed]
Braden: having all the necessary or appropriate parts
complete [slowly - broken down by syllable] complete [natural native speed]
Next:
Barbara: entertainment [natural native speed]
Braden: things that amuse or entertain
Barbara: entertainment [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: entertainment [natural native speed]
Next:
experience [natural native speed]
Braden: knowledge or skill acquired over a period of time
experience [slowly - broken down by syllable] experience [natural native speed]
Next:
Barbara: angle [natural native speed]
Braden: a particular way of approaching or considering an issue
Barbara: angle [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: angle [natural native speed]
Next:
afford [natural native speed]
Braden: have enough money to pay for
afford [slowly - broken down by syllable] afford [natural native speed]
Next:
Barbara: offer [natural native speed]
Braden: present something to someone
Barbara: offer [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: offer [natural native speed]
Next:
shave off [natural native speed]
Braden: to cut from the surface of
shave off [slowly - broken down by syllable] shave off [natural native speed]
Next:
Barbara: compliment [natural native speed]
Braden: a polite expression of praise or admiration
Barbara: compliment [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: compliment [natural native speed]
Next:
buck [natural native speed]
Braden: slang for dollar
buck [slowly - broken down by syllable]
buck [natural native speed]
Next:
Barbara: desk [natural native speed]
Braden: a table-like piece of furniture usually with drawers
Barbara: desk [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Barbara: desk [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Barbara: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase “another angle.”
Braden: Here, the idea is about trying a different angle in order to achieve the sale. To me, I envision a carpenter trying to nail two pieces of wood together.
Barbara: He tries at one angle and is unsuccessful so he tries “another angle.”
Braden: Could you break this down for us?
Barbara: another angle (slowly)
Braden: And one time fast?
Barbara: another angle (fast)
Braden: Perfect! What’s next?
Barbara: Our next word is “sold!”
Braden: “Sold!”Is a common way to agree with a customers proposal. The idea being thatThe proposal was acceptable and therefore the item has been “sold.”
Braden: Could you break this down?
Barbara: sold!(slowly)
Braden: And one time fast?
Barbara: sold! (fast)
Braden: Excellent! Let’s take a look at the grammar point.

Lesson focus

Braden: Barbara, what’s the focus of this lesson?
Barbara: The focus of this lesson is the differences between have and have got
Braden: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase...
Barbara: This is the TV you’ve got to have.
Braden: The differences between "have" and "have got" can be confusing. They are so similar yet, in many instances, are not interchangeable.
Barbara: First we’ll look at "Have" and "Have got.” Both used for possession.
Braden: For example, “Jack has got a beautiful house.” or “Jack has a beautiful house.”
Barbara: Second, only "have" is used when talking about actions.
Braden: For example, “I usually have breakfast at 8 o'clock.” It is awkward to say, “I usually have got breakfast at 8 o'clock.”
Barbara: Third, The question form for "have" follows regular present simple –
Braden: For example, “Do you have a fast car?” While it is technically correct to say, “Have you a fast car?” This is an archaic speech structure. You’ll only see this kind of speech in the religious texts.
Barbara: Fourth, "Have" and "Have got" are only used in the present simple. Use "have" for the past simple or future forms.
Braden: For example, “She had a copy of that book.” It is awkward to say, “She had got a copy of that book.”
Barbara: Fifth, There is no contracted form for "Have" in the positive form. The contracted form is used for "have got"
Braden: For example, “I have a red bicycle.” or “I've got a red bicycle.” but it is incorrect to say, “I've a red bicycle.”
Barbara: We built some tables in the PDF for you to study the structures of “have” and “have got.” So be sure to check those out.
Braden: In general, for positive statements the formula is Subject + have + got + objects
Barbara: For example, “He has a new car.” or “He’s got a new car.”
Braden: In question form, the structure is question word + have + Subject + got then the question mark.
Barbara: For example, “How many children has he got?” or How many children does he have?”
Braden: The negative is formed similarly to the positive. The structure is Subject + have + not + got + objects.
Barbara: For example, “We have not got a dog.” or “She does not have a dog.”

Outro

Braden: That just about does it for today. Thanks for listening.
Barbara: See you later!

7 Comments

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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Have you heard this dialogue? Do you think Mitch is a good negotiator?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 07:39 AM
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Hello Green,


Thanks for getting in touch.


Our website is: EnglishClass101.com


We also have the links to our socials on the bottom right of our site.


I hope this is helpful to you. 😄👍


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Éva

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green
Friday at 01:59 PM
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Barbara said : Just search for EnglishPod/Class.com and like our fan page.

Could you tell me the exact address of "EnglishPod/Class.com" and where is podcast 'like our fan page'?

Englishclass101.com Verified
Monday at 07:51 PM
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Hello AungZW,


Thank you for studying with us!


Should you have any doubts, please contact us.


Cristiane

Team Englishclass101.com

AungZW
Monday at 06:47 PM
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?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 05:16 PM
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Hi Paul,


I think that "Have you got..." sounds more casual. It could be used for a more recent purchase, whereas "do you have...?" is a more standard question you ask about anything. If someone answers "yes" to either question though, it doesn't really change the meaning.


Thanks,

Kellie

Team EnglishClass101.com

Paul
Friday at 10:47 PM
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I wish I had such a negotiator as I had bought a new TV.

"Do you have a new car?" Can we say '' Have you got a new car?"? If answer is positiv, where is the difference between these two sentences?