Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Chihiro: Hi everybody, Chihiro here.
Daniel: Daniel here. Describing People.
Daniel: In this lesson, you will learn how to describe people.
Chihiro: This conversation takes place at a diner.
Daniel: The conversation is between two friends, Mike and Joey.
Chihiro: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Joey: Hold on, Mike. You got to give me the details. You spilled coffee on Susan's then-boyfriend and ended up marrying her? What happened?
Mike: Well, to make a long story short, her boyfriend got really angry and caused a scene. He was really short-tempered and immature. And Susan was embarrassed by his behavior. Meanwhile, I was very calm, diplomatic, and polite.
Joey: So she thought you were a like gentleman and fell in love with you?
Mike: Not exactly. I offered to pay for the cleaning bill and gave her my phone number.
Joey: Why did you give her your number and not her boyfriend?
Mike: Oh, because her boyfriend was so angry.
Joey: Oh, yeah.
Mike: The next week, she called me to apologize about her boyfriend's behavior, and I suggested we get together for coffee and call it even.
Joey: Ah. Good tactic. You're smooth, dude. Smart, too.
Mike: Well, you know. I don't have the looks, so I have to make up for it somehow.
Joey: Right. I mean, no, no, no, you're cool, man! You're cool.
Mike: Anyway, we started dating and got married a year later.
Joey: Wow... Wait a minute. You didn't spill the coffee on her boyfriend on purpose, did you?
Mike: Actually, I did! It works every time!
Joey: That's right! That's how you started dating Michelle!
Mike: Yeah, man. High five!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Daniel: Sounds like Susan and Mike went to a cafe for the old meet-up-for-coffee-first-non date.
Chihiro: Yeah, typical.
Daniel: Meeting up for coffee is a very popular thing to do when inviting somebody out for the first time. This is because it's very casual and many don't consider it a date.
Chihiro: Right, invitations to have coffee are safe and fast, and you can quickly tell if you want to get to know more about the person or not.
Daniel: Yeah, quick is great when you want to just get out of there! Have you gone on any coffee-non-dates, Chihiro?
Chihiro: Yup I have! Sometimes you hit it off really well and it continues on to dinner or better dates...(laughing) other guys, well they make you wish you had ordered an espresso. How about you Daniel? (laughing) All been espresso dates? (More laughing)
Daniel: Yeah, I’ve been on a few coffee-non dates. I was just wondered why the gals I invited ordered espresso.
VOCAB LIST
Daniel: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. What do we have first?
Chihiro: to spill [natural native speed]
Daniel: to cause something to fall over the edge of a container
Chihiro: to spill [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chihiro: to spill [natural native speed]
Daniel: Next...
short-tempered [natural native speed]
Daniel: easy to make angry
short-tempered [slowly - broken down by syllable]
short-tempered [natural native speed]
Daniel: Next...
Chihiro: immature [natural native speed]
Daniel: not fully grown or developed
Chihiro: immature [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chihiro: immature [natural native speed]
Daniel: Next...
diplomatic [natural native speed]
Daniel: showing ability to deal with people in a polite way
diplomatic [slowly - broken down by syllable]
diplomatic [natural native speed]
Daniel: Next...
Chihiro: calm [natural native speed]
Daniel: peaceful, not angry or excited
Chihiro: calm [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chihiro: calm [natural native speed]
Daniel: Next...
polite [natural native speed]
Daniel: having good manners
polite [slowly - broken down by syllable]
polite [natural native speed]
Daniel: Next...
Chihiro: dude [natural native speed]
Daniel: slang for man
Chihiro: dude [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chihiro: dude [natural native speed]
Daniel: Next...
to date [natural native speed]
Daniel: to do an activity with someone with a possibility of a
romantic relationship
to date [slowly - broken down by syllable]
to date [natural native speed]
Daniel: Next...
Chihiro: detail [natural native speed]
Daniel: any smaller part of something bigger
Chihiro: detail [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chihiro: detail [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Daniel: Let’s take a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Chihiro: The first phrase we’ll look at is…
Daniel: “To cause a scene.”
Chihiro: This means that somebody is doing something that attracts a lot of attention from the people who are around that area. In the dialogue, Susan's ex-boyfriend was attracting a lot of attention most likely by perhaps shouting and getting really angry at Mike. It's usually used to talk about negative attention. Here's another example,
Daniel: “The child caused a scene when his mom refused to buy him the toy.”
Chihiro: Here, the child perhaps started crying and yelling because he couldn't get the toy he wanted.
Daniel: Okay, The next phrase we'll look at is,
Chihiro: “You're smooth, dude.”
Daniel: When a person is smooth, it means that he or she does something without any mistakes. The word “dude”
is slang for “man” and is just added at the end. Joey compliments Mike this way because Mike was able to perform everything as planned to get Susan. Here's another example,
Chihiro: “The robber was smooth with his escape.”
Daniel: This means that the robber escaped with no trouble.
Chihiro: Okay, now let's smoothly carry on to the grammar point for this lesson.

Lesson focus

Chihiro: In this lesson you will learn about verbs that follow another verb. We will talk about two types of structures, verb + infinitive, which is the dictionary form of the verb, and verb + gerund or “-ing” form of the verb.
Daniel: Some verbs that come after another verb can only be in the infinitive form, some others can only be in the gerund form, and some can be both. The first verb determines the form of the second verb, that is, whether it'll be an infinitive or gerund. Here's an example from the dialogue.
Chihiro: “I offered to pay for the cleaning bill and gave her my phone number.”
Daniel: This sentence from the dialogue has the word “offered” as the first verb, which determines the infinitive form of the following verb, “to pay.” Chihiro, give us an example of a gerund.
Chihiro: “He suggested eating at a later time.”
Daniel: Here, the first verb “suggested” determines the following verb “eating” in its gerund form.
Chihiro: Some verbs can take on both the infinitive and gerund forms. Take this sentence from the dialogue for example,
Daniel: “Anyway, we started dating and got married a year later.”
Chihiro: The verb “started” is followed by a gerund form. However, we can also create a sentence with the same verb such as,
Daniel: “She started to play her guitar late at night.”
Chihiro: And follow it with an infinitive form, “to play.”
Daniel: There's a catch though so be careful. Depending on the verb, the meaning might differ between the infinitive form and the gerund form. For example, when the verb “remember” takes on the gerund form, it talks about the past as in,
Chihiro: “I still remember riding down that hill.”
Daniel: But when followed by an infinitive, it talks about the future as in,
Chihiro: “Please remember to ask her about the apartment.”
Daniel: Or a task that had to be done, as in,
Chihiro: “He remembered to pick up the dry cleaning.”
Daniel: Right, so be careful.
Chihiro: Just be aware of these and learn them one by one. Take a look at the PDF for the lesson notes as well to help you understand better.

Outro

Daniel: That just about does it for today.
Daniel: Okay, see you all soon.
Chihiro: Bye for now.
REPETITION OF DIALOGUE
Joey: Hold on, Mike. You got to give me the details. You spilled coffee on Susan's then-boyfriend and ended up marrying her? What happened?
Mike: Well, to make a long story short, her boyfriend got really angry and caused a scene. He was really short-tempered and immature. And Susan was embarrassed by his behavior. Meanwhile, I was very calm, diplomatic, and polite.
Joey: So she thought you were a like gentleman and fell in love with you?
Mike: Not exactly. I offered to pay for the cleaning bill and gave her my phone number.
Joey: Why did you give her your number and not her boyfriend?
Mike: Oh, because her boyfriend was so angry.
Joey: Oh, yeah.
Mike: The next week, she called me to apologize about her boyfriend's behavior, and I suggested we get together for coffee and call it even.
Joey: Ah. Good tactic. You're smooth, dude. Smart, too.
Mike: Well, you know. I don't have the looks, so I have to make up for it somehow.
Joey: Right. I mean, no, no, no, you're cool, man! You're cool.
Mike: Anyway, we started dating and got married a year later.
Joey: Wow... Wait a minute. You didn't spill the coffee on her boyfriend on purpose, did you?
Mike: Actually, I did! It works every time!
Joey: That's right! That's how you started dating Michelle!
Mike: Yeah, man. High five!

73 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 12:40 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Simo,


Thank you for getting in touch! It's great to have you studying with us.😄😄😄


In relation to your question regarding 'infinitives' and 'gerunds,' both of those are forms of a noun. An infinitives usually begins with the word "to" and is followed by the base form of a verb e.g. to sing, to laugh, to play. Gerunds end in '-ing' - he is eating, she was dancing, they were singing.


If you would like further assistance or if you're still having problems understanding this lesson I suggest contacting your teacher through the 'MyTeacher' feature on our site. Your personal teacher will be more than happy to assist you!👍


Most kindly,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Simo
Sunday at 11:15 PM
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Hi how are you? 😉 Which is the rules to use gerund or infinitive? Could you give me a list of verbs that are followed by gerund and other by infinitive?

‪Amir Alkathiri‬‏
Tuesday at 01:01 AM
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excuse me,


what does this phrase ( call it even) mean in this context ( I suggested we get together for coffee and call it even)?

‪Amir Alkathiri‬‏
Tuesday at 12:02 AM
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Hi,

what's the difference between saying: You got to give me the details, and: you have to give me the details?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 09:01 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Kiran,


Thanks for getting in touch with us. 👍


Please feel free to download this lesson from our 'Download as PDF' link above.


I hope this is helpful to you. 😄👍


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

kiran
Thursday at 06:00 AM
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please !! attach the exercise sheet so I can practice easily.

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 02:06 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Paulo,


Thanks for taking the time to post and share. 👍


Please feel free to ask us any questions you have throughout your studies.


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

paulo oliveira
Friday at 12:14 AM
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Chihiro, too cute =)

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 12:46 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Peter,


Thanks for your comment and question.


Gerunds are verbs that end with "-ing" and act like a noun. They occupy part of the sentence that would usually be used for a noun. For example, "learning," "believing," "running," "dancing" and "playing" can all be gerunds.


An infinitive is the simplest form of the verb and when the preposition 'to' is used before the word. For example, "I like to read," "I like to run every day," "I promise to love you forever," and "I like to learn new things."


I hope this is helpful to you. 😄👍


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Peter
Wednesday at 08:50 AM
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Hi.


I don't understand this grammar. Which words use gerunds, which words use infinitives?

Does it have a specific case or situation?


Thanks,