Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Daniel: Hey everybody, Daniel here.
Chihiro: Chihiro here. Buying a Ticket.
Daniel: Chihiro, what are we learning about in this lesson?
Chihiro: Well, in this lesson, you will learn how to buy tickets.
Daniel: This conversation takes place at the ticket counter.
Chihiro: The conversation is between Susan and the ticket agent.
Chihiro: Okay, so let’s listen to the conversation.
Daniel: They will be speaking casually.
DIALOGUE
(Mike and Susan are at TKTS, the discount ticket counter for Broadway and off-Broadway shows)
Susan: Two tickets to "Wicked," please.
Ticket Agent: Matinee or an evening show?
Susan: Matinee, please.
Ticket Agent: This is your lucky day, ma'am. We've got front row tickets on the mezzanine level.
Mike: What's a mezzanine?
Susan: It means the second floor of a theater.
Mike: I knew that.
Susan: Great. We'll take them.
Ticket Agent: Do you want seats in the center or right-hand side?
Susan: Center, of course!
Ticket Agent: All right. Two tickets to today's matinee. Front-row center mezzanine level. That'll be a hundred and twenty dollars total.
Susan: Thank you.
Susan: I can't believe we got front-row mezzanine for "Wicked!" It's one of the most popular shows on Broadway. Most people can't even get in!
Mike: Well, we deserve it! We've been waiting outside TKTS since six a.m.!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Chihiro: Nice, sounds like they're going to watch a musical!
Daniel: Yeah, how about you, are you into musicals?
Chihiro: I am! I like them very much! I like the whole singing live act, and so musicals are one of the things I really like to watch. Although, I like stage performances in general, musical or not.
Daniel: Yeah? Like which ones?
Chihiro: Well I've seen Phantom of the Opera, Miss Saigon, Grease, and stage performances such as ballet and some other dance groups, I especially like the Blue Man Group!
Daniel: You know that theater is a popular form of entertainment in New York and many other places around the world for those like Chihiro who like them. And many of them are musicals, like the ones that have been mentioned.
Chihiro: Right, depending on the show and the popularity, tickets may be hard to get or may need to be reserved ahead of time to get good seats. So Daniel, how about you? Any musicals that you like?
Daniel: Nah, I'm not really into musicals. I prefer to separate drama from music.
Chihiro: Fine, be that way!
Daniel: Sorry.
VOCAB LIST
Chihiro: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word is:
Daniel: Broadway [natural native speed]
Chihiro: street in New York where there are many theaters, also used to refer to the world of theater
Daniel: Broadway [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Daniel: Broadway [natural native speed]
Chihiro: Next...
Daniel: ticket [natural native speed]
Chihiro: a piece of paper that serves as a permit
Daniel: ticket [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Daniel: ticket [natural native speed]
Chihiro: Next...
Daniel: discount [natural native speed]
Chihiro: at a reduced price
Daniel: discount [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Daniel: discount [natural native speed]
Chihiro: Next...
Daniel: agent [natural native speed]
Chihiro: person who does business for another
Daniel: agent [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Daniel: agent [natural native speed]
Chihiro: Next...
Daniel: lucky [natural native speed]
Chihiro: having good chance or fortune
Daniel: lucky [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Daniel: lucky [natural native speed]
Chihiro: Next...
Daniel: row [natural native speed]
Chihiro: straight line of things or people
Daniel: row [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Daniel: row [natural native speed]
Chihiro: Next...
Daniel: theater [natural native speed]
Chihiro: place where performances are held on stage
Daniel: theater [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Daniel: theater [natural native speed]
Chihiro: Next...
Daniel: to deserve [natural native speed]
Chihiro: to be worthy of something
Daniel: to deserve [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Daniel: to deserve [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Chihiro: Let’s take a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Daniel: Let's take a look at the words “matinee” and “evening show.” “Matinee” means “in the afternoon,” as oppose to an evening show. The word “matinee” is used for movies, plays, and theaters and comes from a French word... which originally meant “morning,” but was used in English to mean “daytime.”
Chihiro: Cool. So, next we have the phrase, “This is your lucky day.” This is a phrase used to tell a person that they are lucky to have gotten what they did. In other words, by chance they are in a better position. The ticket agent says this to Susan because she had two front row seats available for them. These are very good seats that usually get sold out quickly.
Daniel: Try using this phrase on a friend when giving good news. For example,
Chihiro: “Hey Daniel, do you happen to have the grammar point notes with you? I forgot them at my desk...”
Daniel: “Chihiro, it's your lucky day! They're right here!”

Lesson focus

Chihiro: Okay, today we're going to talk about the present perfect progressive. This tense is used to talk about how long things have been continuing up to now.
Daniel: Right, try not to confuse this with the regular present perfect tense, which is used to talk about something in the past that has a connection to the present. The present perfect progressive is used for talking about how someone has been using their time up to now. For example,
Chihiro: “We've been traveling for a few months.”
Daniel: This means that we started traveling in the past, and we're still traveling even now.
Chihiro: To form this tense, the sentence structure is, subject + “have”/”has” + “been” + the present participle, which is the “-ing” form of a verb. Here's an example from the dialogue.
Daniel: “We've been waiting outside of TKTS since 6 a.m.!”
Chihiro: Okay. Now, to form the negative, the structure is, subject + “have”/”has” + “been” + “not” + the present participle. For example,
Daniel: “I have not been sleeping much lately.”
Chihiro: In questions, switch the subject with the “have”/”has” and the structure would be, “have”/”has” + subject + “been” + present participle, as in this sentence,
Daniel: “Have you been studying the present participle?” Listeners, remember that the present participles are formed depending on the verb. So review Lower Intermediate Lesson 15 on how to form the present participle if you're a little rusty.
Chihiro: And also keep in mind that contractions are often used with the subject and “have”/”has,” especially in spoken English. For example,
Daniel: “He's been playing all morning.”
Chihiro: Try and use the contractions so that you can understand it when you hear it.
Daniel: And one last thing. “Be,” “know,” and “have” are non-progressive verbs, so they do not take the present perfect progressive form. When using “be,” “now,” and “have,” use the present perfect form.
Chihiro: Right, good note Daniel, and good luck listeners!
Daniel: And also remember to take a look at the lesson notes in the PDF as it will help you to understand better.

Outro

Chihiro: That just about does it for today.
Chihiro: See you later everybody!
Daniel: Later guys!
REPETITION OF DIALOGUE
(Mike and Susan are at TKTS, the discount ticket counter for Broadway and off-Broadway shows)
Susan: Two tickets to "Wicked," please.
Ticket Agent: Matinee or an evening show?
Susan: Matinee, please.
Ticket Agent: This is your lucky day, ma'am. We've got front row tickets on the mezzanine level.
Mike: What's a mezzanine?
Susan: It means the second floor of a theater.
Mike: I knew that.
Susan: Great. We'll take them.
Ticket Agent: Do you want seats in the center or right-hand side?
Susan: Center, of course!
Ticket Agent: All right. Two tickets to today's matinee. Front-row center mezzanine level. That'll be a hundred and twenty dollars total.
Susan: Thank you.
Susan: I can't believe we got front-row mezzanine for "Wicked!" It's one of the most popular shows on
Broadway. Most people can't even get in!
Mike :Well, we deserve it! We've been waiting outside TKTS since six a.m.!

38 Comments

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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 09:39 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Saïba,


Thanks for getting in touch!


We use the word 'person' to refer to someone non-specific, or someone you don't know the sex of. We use 'they' with the word 'person' as it is also used when referring to a generic person whose gender is unknown or irrelevant to the context.


I hope this is helpful to you. 😄👍


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Saïba
Monday at 01:02 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi,

I am have something confusing in this sentence: "This is a phrase used to tell a person that they are lucky to have gotten what they did".

Why do we use "person" with " they are " ?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 07:05 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Hesham,


Thanks for the question. 👍


The first example is correct. The second example you would just need to add the article 'the' to it e.g. "Two tickets for the matinee today."


I hope this is helpful to you. 😄👍


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Hesham
Friday at 12:19 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi,


“Two tickets to today's matinee”. Is it the same if i say “two tickets for matinee today”


Regards

Hesham

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 01:36 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Yasu,


Thanks for taking the time to post and share. 👍


The word "gotten" is often heard in North America. It is the past tense of 'get.' It is an informal way of speaking. I would recommend using 'got.' It does mean the same thing.


Feel free to shoot through any questions you have throughout your studies.


Many thanks,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Yasu
Saturday at 11:37 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello

I have a question.

Ticket Agent said "We've got front row tickets on the mezzanine level."

Do "We've got" and "We've gotten" mean same thing?


Best regards

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Sunday at 07:24 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello sina,


You are very very welcome. 😇 Also, thanks for the hearts.❤️️❤️️❤️️

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

We wish you good luck with your language studies.


Kind regards,

Levente

Team EnglishClass101.com

sina
Saturday at 06:35 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi

my favorite Broadway show is"Alexander Hamilton"

and another thing at the bottom line of dialogue you didn't mention to o'clock.


thank you very much❤️️❤️️❤️️

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 08:34 PM
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Hello Az Ho,


Thank you so much for your heart! ❤️️❤️️

We are very happy that you like to study with us.

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.


Kind regards,

Levente

Team EnglishClass101.com

Az Ho
Tuesday at 03:27 AM
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❤️️❤️️❤️️❤️️