Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Expressions Related to Being Angry
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to EnglishClass101.com. I'm John.
Sydney: And I'm Sydney!
John: This is Must-Know American Slang Words and Phrases, Season 1, Lesson 11. In this lesson, you'll learn expressions related to being angry.
John: These are good expressions to use when someone or something pushes your buttons.
SLANG EXPRESSIONS
John: The expressions you will be learning in this lesson are:
Sydney: salty
Sydney: eating away at
Sydney: to trash
Sydney: pain in the neck
John: Sydney, what's our first expression?
Sydney: salty
John: meaning "annoyed or irritated."
Sydney: [SLOW] salty [NORMAL] salty
John: Listeners, please repeat.
Sydney: salty
[pause - 5 sec.]
John: Literally, “salty” describes something that has a high salt content. But when it’s used as a slang expression, it means annoyed or irritated by someone else’s actions.
Sydney: This is a newer slang term that is mostly used among young people. It should only be used in casual contexts.
John: Now let's hear an example sentence.
Sydney: [NORMAL] "She's salty because her friend made fun of her." [SLOW] "She's salty because her friend made fun of her."
Sydney: [NORMAL] "She's salty because her friend made fun of her."
John: Okay, what's the next expression?
Sydney: eating away at
John: meaning "to bother or upset."
Sydney: [SLOW] eating away at [NORMAL] eating away at
John: Listeners, please repeat.
Sydney: eating away at
[pause - 5 sec.]
John: This phrase has nothing to do with lunch. In fact, it might make you lose your appetite. The phrase "eating away at," means something is really bothering you or upsetting you and you can't seem to shake it.
Sydney: For example, if you're in a difficult situation and are becoming very stressed you could say, "The problem is eating away at me."
John: Now let's hear an example sentence.
Sydney: [NORMAL] "I don't know what to do, it's really eating away at me." [SLOW] "I don't know what to do, it's really eating away at me."
Sydney: [NORMAL] "I don't know what to do, it's really eating away at me."
John: Okay, what's our next expression?
Sydney: to trash
John: meaning "to destroy, damage, wreck."
Sydney: [SLOW] to trash [NORMAL] to trash
John: Listeners, please repeat.
Sydney: to trash
[pause - 5 sec.]
John: The word "trash" literally means garbage. But when it's used as a slang verb, it means "to destroy, wreck, or damage something."
Sydney: This term is used by everyone and is non-offensive, but should be avoided in formal contexts.
John: Now let's hear an example sentence.
Sydney: [NORMAL] "The older kids trashed the house and then left." [SLOW] "The older kids trashed the house and then left."
Sydney: [NORMAL] "The older kids trashed the house and then left."
John: Okay, what's the last expression?
Sydney: pain in the neck
John: meaning "an annoyance."
Sydney: [SLOW] pain in the neck [NORMAL] pain in the neck
John: Listeners, please repeat.
Sydney: pain in the neck
[pause - 5 sec.]
John: The use of this phrase dates back to the 1900s and is obviously comparing the physical pain in one's body to the annoyance of a person or an activity.
Sydney: If someone you know is being particularly bothersome that day, you could say he or she is, "a pain in the neck." Note that this is a bit offensive.
John: Now let's hear an example sentence.
Sydney: [NORMAL] I love traveling, but it's a pain in the neck to go through customs. [SLOW] I love traveling, but it's a pain in the neck to go through customs.
Sydney: [NORMAL] I love traveling, but it's a pain in the neck to go through customs.
QUIZ
John: Okay listeners, are you ready to be quizzed on the expressions you just learned? I will describe four situations, and you will choose the right expression to use in your reply. Are you ready?
John: A person feels guilty for scratching a car and leaving the scene.
[pause - 5 sec.]
Sydney: eating away at
John: "to bother or upset"
John: A guy is annoyed that his friends made fun of him
[pause - 5 sec.]
Sydney: salty
John: "irritated or annoyed"
John: A teacher is frustrated with his students’ loudness.
[pause - 5 sec.]
Sydney: pain in the neck
John: "an annoyance"
John: A group of teens destroy their hotel room.
[pause - 5 sec.]
Sydney: trash
John: "to destroy, damage, wreck"

Outro

John: There you have it; you have mastered four English Slang Expressions! We have more vocab lists available at EnglishClass101.com so be sure to check them out. Thanks everyone, and see you next time!
Sydney: Goodbye!

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Hi Listeners! Do you know any other related slang expression? Post them in the comments.