Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Expressions Related to Failure
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to EnglishClass101.com. I'm John.
Sydney: And I'm Sydney!
John: This is Must-Know American Slang Words and Phrases, Season 1, Lesson 12. In this lesson, you'll learn expressions related to failure.
John: These are very common expressions that Americans use in their everyday life.
SLANG EXPRESSIONS
John: The expressions you will be learning in this lesson are:
Sydney: a fifth wheel
Sydney: shot down
Sydney: blow it
Sydney: wouldn't put it past someone
John: Sydney, what's our first expression?
Sydney: a fifth wheel
John: meaning "an extra or unnecessary person in a situation."
Sydney: [SLOW] a fifth wheel [NORMAL] a fifth wheel
John: Listeners, please repeat.
Sydney: a fifth wheel
[pause - 5 sec.]
John: The phrase, “a fifth wheel” dates back all the way to the 17th century, when an additional wheel was carried on the back of 4-wheel coaches and carriages.
Sydney: Nowadays, it refers to an extra or unnecessary person in a situation. For example, if five people go out to the movies and four of them are two couples, the remaining, single person would be considered a “fifth wheel.”
John: Now let's hear an example sentence.
Sydney: [NORMAL] You guys can go to the game without me; I'll feel like a fifth wheel. [SLOW] You guys can go to the game without me; I'll feel like a fifth wheel.
Sydney: [NORMAL] You guys can go to the game without me; I'll feel like a fifth wheel.
John: Okay, what's the next expression?
Sydney: shot down
John: meaning "rejected."
Sydney: [SLOW] shot down [NORMAL] shot down
John: Listeners, please repeat.
Sydney: shot down
[pause - 5 sec.]
John: "Shot down" may have origins from the use of guns. However, nowadays it's used to describe someone who was rejected or denied.
Sydney: For example, if your friend tried to ask someone for a date, but your friend was rejected, you can say he or she was "shot down."
John: Now let's hear an example sentence.
Sydney: [NORMAL] I asked a girl out on a date, but she shot me down. [SLOW] I asked a girl out on a date, but she shot me down.
Sydney: [NORMAL] I asked a girl out on a date, but she shot me down.
John: Okay, what's our next expression?
Sydney: blow it
John: meaning "to absolutely fail."
Sydney: [SLOW] blow it [NORMAL] blow it
John: Listeners, please repeat.
Sydney: blow it
[pause - 5 sec.]
John: "Blow it" is used synonymously with "make a mistake," "fail," or "botch." One may say this if they feel they completely spoiled or messed up an important event.
Sydney: It also may imply that the person has also ruined further chances for success, as in this example, "I blew it at the interview, there's no way I'll get the job now."
John: Now let's hear an example sentence.
Sydney: [NORMAL] This is a great chance to prove yourself; don't blow this opportunity. [SLOW] This is a great chance to prove yourself; don't blow this opportunity.
Sydney: [NORMAL] This is a great chance to prove yourself; don't blow this opportunity.
John: Okay, what's the last expression?
Sydney: wouldn't put it past someone
John: meaning "to believe that someone is capable of doing something bad."
Sydney: [SLOW] wouldn't put it past someone [NORMAL] wouldn't put it past someone
John: Listeners, please repeat.
Sydney: wouldn't put it past someone
[pause - 5 sec.]
John: If you say you "wouldn't put something past someone," it means you think that they are capable or even likely to do something. Usually this action is a bad thing to do. If you believe that someone might cheat on a test, you can say, "I wouldn't put cheating past them."
Sydney: This expression can never be used in the affirmative, such as "I would put it past them"; this is an incorrect sentence.
John: Now let's hear an example sentence.
Sydney: [NORMAL] "Do you think he'll lie about it? -I wouldn't put it past him." [SLOW] "Do you think he'll lie about it? -I wouldn't put it past him."
Sydney: [NORMAL] "Do you think he'll lie about it? -I wouldn't put it past him."
QUIZ
John: Okay listeners, are you ready to be quizzed on the expressions you just learned? I will describe four situations, and you will choose the right expression to use in your reply. Are you ready?
John: A girl is rejected by the guy she likes.
[pause - 5 sec.]
Sydney: shot down
John: "rejected"
John: A friend tags along on a date.
[pause - 5 sec.]
Sydney: a fifth wheel
John: "an extra or unnecessary person in a situation"
John: A girl thinks her friend stole money from her.
[pause - 5 sec.]
Sydney: wouldn't put it past someone
John: "to believe that someone is capable of doing something bad"
John: A student fails a test.
[pause - 5 sec.]
Sydney: blow it
John: "to absolutely fail "

Outro

John: There you have it; you have mastered four English Slang Expressions! We have more vocab lists available at EnglishClass101.com so be sure to check them out. Thanks everyone, and see you next time!
Sydney: Goodbye!

1 Comment

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Listeners! Do you know any other related slang expression? Post them in the comments.