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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Expressions Related to Being Surprised or Amazed
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to EnglishClass101.com. I'm John.
Sydney: And I'm Sydney!
John: This is Must-Know American Slang Words and Phrases, Season 1, Lesson 2. In this lesson, you'll learn expressions related to being surprised or amazed.
John: These expressions are useful when you want to describe surprising or amazing things that happened to you.
SLANG EXPRESSIONS
John: The expressions you will be learning in this lesson are:
Sydney: knock your socks off
Sydney: to blow someone's mind
Sydney: to be floored
Sydney: ring a bell
John: Sydney, what's our first expression?
Sydney: knock your socks off
John: meaning "impress, amaze."
Sydney: [SLOW] knock your socks off [NORMAL] knock your socks off
John: Listeners, please repeat.
Sydney: knock your socks off
[pause - 5 sec.]
John: Use this slang expression when something amazes, impresses, or surprises you; it might even be a little overwhelming.
John: Now let's hear an example sentence.
Sydney: [NORMAL] "Wait till you see the new building. It will knock your socks off." [SLOW] "Wait till you see the new building. It will knock your socks off."
Sydney: [NORMAL] "Wait till you see the new building. It will knock your socks off."
John: Okay, what's the next expression?
Sydney: to blow someone's mind
John: meaning "to make someone’s head explode," but when it’s used as a slang expression, it means "surprise" or "amaze."
Sydney: [SLOW] to blow someone's mind [NORMAL] to blow someone's mind
John: Listeners, please repeat.
Sydney: to blow someone's mind
[pause - 5 sec.]
John: Use this slang expression when referring to something amazing or surprising. A person, event, movie, or situation can "blow one’s mind" when it’s particularly shocking, exciting, or inspiring.
John: Now let's hear an example sentence.
Sydney: [NORMAL] Did you see those special effects? They blew my mind! [SLOW] Did you see those special effects? They blew my mind!
Sydney: [NORMAL] Did you see those special effects? They blew my mind!
John: Okay, what's our next expression?
Sydney: to be floored
John: meaning "to be shocked, stunned, surprised."
Sydney: [SLOW] to be floored [NORMAL] to be floored
John: Listeners, please repeat.
Sydney: to be floored
[pause - 5 sec.]
John: If you've been "floored," that means something shocked you so much that you nearly fell onto the floor.
Sydney: It sometimes has a negative connotation, as in you are shocked someone would do such a thing. But, it can also be used to mean that you were surprised or overwhelmed by a positive emotion.
John: Now let's hear an example sentence.
Sydney: [NORMAL] "I was just floored that she would do that." [SLOW] "I was just floored that she would do that."
Sydney: [NORMAL] "I was just floored that she would do that."
John: Okay, what's the last expression?
Sydney: ring a bell
John: meaning "to cause a bell to make a sound," but when it’s used as a slang expression, it means "to remind someone of something."
Sydney: [SLOW] ring a bell [NORMAL] ring a bell
John: Listeners, please repeat.
Sydney: ring a bell
[pause - 5 sec.]
John: If something "rings a bell," that means it seems familiar, but you don't quite remember. Names of people and places often "ring bells," even if we can't remember exactly who or what they are. Now, let's hear an example sentence.
Sydney: [NORMAL] "Do you remember going to that lecture four years ago?" "It rings a bell, but no." [SLOW] "Do you remember going to that lecture four years ago?" "It rings a bell, but no."
Sydney: [NORMAL] "Do you remember going to that lecture four years ago?" "It rings a bell, but no."
QUIZ
John: Okay listeners, are you ready to be quizzed on the expressions you just learned? I will describe four situations, and you will choose the right expression to use in your reply. Are you ready?
John: A magician disappears during a magic trick.
[pause - 5 sec.]
Sydney: to blow someone's mind
John: "surprise or amaze"
John: A teacher is in awe of a student’s essay.
[pause - 5 sec.]
Sydney: knock your socks off
John: "impress, amaze"
John: You hear a phrase you think you heard before.
[pause - 5 sec.]
Sydney: ring a bell
John: "to seem familiar, to remind someone of something"
John: You win the lottery.
[pause - 5 sec.]
Sydney: to be floored
John: "to be shocked, stunned, surprised"

Outro

John: There you have it; you have mastered four English Slang Expressions! We have more vocab lists available at EnglishClass101.com so be sure to check them out. Thanks everyone, and see you next time!
Sydney: Goodbye!

8 Comments

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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners! Do you know any other related slang expression? Post them in the comments.

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 01:25 PM
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Hi there Az Ho,


Thanks for your post and the positive feedback!


Please feel free to shoot through any questions you have throughout your studies.


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Az Ho
Wednesday at 11:27 AM
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❤️️❤️️❤️️❤️️❤️️

EnglishClass101.com
Saturday at 08:00 PM
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Hi Tabassom,


The expression you're asking about is "ring a bell" - it means does something remind you of something else or when you are trying to stimulate someones memory.


I hope this is helpful to you.


Cheers,

Eva

Team EnglishClass101.com



Tabassom
Friday at 06:37 AM
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Hi. I can't understand the meaning of the example for ( ring a bell) what does it say? can we use these expressions when we are ,amazed or surprised or shocked? I mean they have the same meaning. yeah?

Tnx

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 02:19 PM
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Hello Ed,


Thanks for posting!


You can totally use those, they're perfectly fine and good adaptations of the phrase. We like your style!


If you have anymore questions please let us know!


Cheers!


Patricia

Team EnglishClass101.com

Ed
Wednesday at 07:04 AM
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Hello,

Would it be correct to use in some cases instead of "knock your socks off" a modified phrase "knocked her socks off"?

or if to use your example sentence about a magician in the lesson, can I say that 'the magician knocked everybody's socks off with his disappearing trick'?

Aoi
Wednesday at 03:43 AM
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I heard "Great Scott!" from the movie Back to the Future, and it is an expression of impression/amaze, isn't it? But, is it often used in real life?