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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Expressions Related to Undesirable Situations
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to EnglishClass101.com. I'm John.
Sydney: And I'm Sydney!
John: This is Must-Know American Slang Words and Phrases, Season 1, Lesson 23. In this lesson, you'll learn expressions related to undesirable situations.
John: Americans often use these expressions when they feel baffled or are in a certain difficult situation.
SLANG EXPRESSIONS
John: The expressions you will be learning in this lesson are:
Sydney: rough time
Sydney: in a pickle
Sydney: up in the air
Sydney: slipped my mind
John: Sydney, what's our first expression?
Sydney: rough time
John: meaning "to be going through a difficult experience."
Sydney: [SLOW] rough time [NORMAL] rough time
John: Listeners, please repeat.
Sydney: rough time
[pause - 5 sec.]
John: This is a very common English phrase that's used when you are experiencing some difficulties in your life. It's sounds more natural than simply saying, "I'm sad."
Sydney: So if you're in the middle of a tough situation, you can tell your friends, "I'm going through a rough time right now."
John: Now let's hear an example sentence.
Sydney: [NORMAL] "I'm going through a rough time, my dog just passed away." [SLOW] "I'm going through a rough time, my dog just passed away."
Sydney: [NORMAL] "I'm going through a rough time, my dog just passed away."
John: Okay, what's the next expression?
Sydney: in a pickle
John: meaning "in trouble, having a dilemma."
Sydney: [SLOW] in a pickle [NORMAL] in a pickle
John: Listeners, please repeat.
Sydney: in a pickle
[pause - 5 sec.]
John: "A pickle" is a cucumber that has been preserved in brine. But, if you're "in a pickle," that means you're in trouble or having a dilemma. If you find yourself on the side of the road with a flat tire, you could say that you're "in a pickle."
Sydney: This expression is generally used by older people. It should only be used in casual contexts.
John: Now let's hear an example sentence.
Sydney: [NORMAL] "This is quite a pickle you've gotten us into." [SLOW] "This is quite a pickle you've gotten us into."
Sydney: [NORMAL] "This is quite a pickle you've gotten us into."
John: Okay, what's our next expression?
Sydney: up in the air
John: meaning "uncertain."
Sydney: [SLOW] up in the air [NORMAL] up in the air
John: Listeners, please repeat.
Sydney: up in the air
[pause - 5 sec.]
John: If something is "up in the air," that means the end result is uncertain and could go either way. Plans might be up in the air if you haven't decided exactly when or where they will take place.
Sydney: This expression can be used in both formal and informal circumstances.
John: Now let's hear an example sentence.
Sydney: [NORMAL] "Are you still going to the mountains for Christmas?" "That's still up in the air." [SLOW] "Are you still going to the mountains for Christmas?" "That's still up in the air."
Sydney: [NORMAL] "Are you still going to the mountains for Christmas?" "That's still up in the air."
John: Okay, what's the last expression?
Sydney: slipped my mind
John: meaning "to forget something."
Sydney: [SLOW] slipped my mind [NORMAL] slipped my mind
John: Listeners, please repeat.
Sydney: slipped my mind
[pause - 5 sec.]
John: If you've ever forgotten to do something, it may have "slipped your mind." This is usually used for something small, like to mail a birthday card or pick up your dry-cleaning.
Sydney: For example, if your friend reminds you that you have a lunch date tomorrow, you can say, "I'm sorry! It's totally slipped my mind!"
John: Now let's hear an example sentence.
Sydney: [NORMAL] "The meeting's today? It totally slipped my mind!" [SLOW] "The meeting's today? It totally slipped my mind!"
Sydney: [NORMAL] "The meeting's today? It totally slipped my mind!"
QUIZ
John: Okay listeners, are you ready to be quizzed on the expressions you just learned? I will describe four situations, and you will choose the right expression to use in your reply. Are you ready?
John: A man locks his keys in his car.
[pause - 5 sec.]
Sydney: in a pickle
John: "in trouble, having a dilemma"
John: A wife has trouble getting out of bed after her husband’s death.
[pause - 5 sec.]
Sydney: rough time
John: "to be going through a difficult experience"
John: A mother forgets to pack her child’s lunch.
[pause - 5 sec.]
Sydney: slipped my mind
John: "to forget something "
John: Her friends asked her what her plans for summer were, but she didn’t know.
[pause - 5 sec.]
Sydney: up in the air
John: "uncertain"

Outro

John: There you have it; you have mastered four English Slang Expressions! We have more vocab lists available at EnglishClass101.com so be sure to check them out. Thanks everyone, and see you next time!
Sydney: Goodbye!

3 Comments

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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners! Do you know any other related slang expression? Post them in the comments.

EnglishClass101.com
Friday at 06:38 PM
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Hi Ahlam,


Thank you for the cute emoticons!


We hope you liked the lesson!


Let us know if you have any questions.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team EnglishClass101.com

ahlam
Friday at 05:21 PM
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