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Lesson Transcript

In the States, the currency is the dollar. The money consists of coins and bills, in which the coins are the smaller unit called cents. There are 100 cents in a dollar. The coins come in 1, 5, 10, 25 cents, and are called penny, nickel, dime, and quarter respectively. There's actually a dollar coin, but they are less common. The bills come in 1, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100 and a few more, but those are the ones you will mainly see in daily transactions.
Let's try to say prices in English. Let's start with $ 28.50
The long way is twenty eight dollars and fifty cents. This is very straightforward. First, we say the number, then dollars. Secondly, note that the two numbers are separated by the conjunction and. Finally, we say the number of cents and the word cents. So, once again - twenty eight dollars and fifty cents. Dollars and cents are the plural forms, and the singular form is dollar and cent.
However, saying dollar and cent is not so common. Let's learn the easiest and local way of saying the price. In this case it would be, twenty eight fifty. Simply drop the words dollar and cent.Once again, twenty eight fifty.
Let's have one more example
$4.99 would be four ninety nine. The ninety nine cent pricing is very popular in the States, so it's a good one to remember. It's said fast and the pronunciation can be hard to catch. But now you know what they're saying.Four ninety nine.
Here are some different ways to talk about money. The slang term buck is used in place of dollar often in conversations. Also, a $100 bill can be called a Benjamin since it has Benjamin Franklin on the note. The word dough is a word that means money as well.
Okay, now to close out today's lesson, we'd like you to practice what you've just learned. I'll say the phrase or sentence, and why don't you try saying it out loud? Good luck everybody!
- Twenty eight dollars and fifty cents
- Four ninety nine.
- Twenty eight fifty
- Buck
- Benjamin
- Dough
All right, that's going to do it for today! See you all soon!

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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Do you have any questions about the names of US currency?

Khanh
Wednesday at 11:58 AM
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Hi Hogan Zhang,


Thank you for your comments. No worries, keep practicing and you English will be improved in no time!


Have a great day!


Khanh.

Team EnglishClass101.com

Hogan Zhang
Thursday at 11:46 AM
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Wow, I have learned how to recognize the "numbers" and the "money". The main point is if you say the "point" or not. Haha, great job, thanks a lot.

Hogan Zhang
Thursday at 11:33 AM
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Hi, It's very difficult for me to listen the numbers clearly when I was in the supermarket or convenience stores.

I have no sensitive to the numbers, I feel annoyed.

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Sunday at 09:34 PM
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Hi sanaz,


As said below, you can use "dough" as a slang term for "money."


โ€œDo you have any money?โ€ = โ€œDo you have any dough?โ€


Hope that helps!

Kellie

Team EnglishClass101.com

sanaz
Sunday at 01:05 PM
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Hi

I have a question. I didn't get what the meaning of 'dough' is and when we use that.

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Sunday at 05:04 PM
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Hi Leo,


You can use "buck" in place of "dollar" and "dough" in place of "money".


For example

"I have 10 dollars." = "I have 10 bucks."

"Do you have any money?" = "Do you have any dough?"


Hope that helps!

Kellie

Team EnglishClass101.com

Leo
Sunday at 10:21 PM
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Hi guys!


I'm really confuse to use Buck and Dough.


I would you like a some more examples!


Thanks!


Leo

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 12:02 PM
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Hi Arthur,


When talking about money, we wouldn't say "point". Just "four ninety-nine" or "four dollars and ninety-nine cents".


When we read numbers, we would say "point". So 4.99 in numbers is "four point ninety-nine".


I hope that helps!


Thanks,


Kellie

Team EnglishClass101.com

Arthur
Tuesday at 09:37 PM
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Hi, I'm new here

Would you add these words "Buck, Benjamin, Dough" to the vocabulary list? So that I can add them to flashcard.

4.99 USD......Can I read four point nine nine US dollars


And how to read "4.999+ 0.001 = 5"? The way to read numbers is different from currency?

Kyle
Thursday at 02:11 PM
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Coins come in 1 5 10 25 penny, nickel, dime, quarter

Bills come in 1, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100

28.50 - twenty-eight dollars and fifty cents

4.99 - four ninety-nine

28.50 - twenty-eight fifty

Buck, Benjamin, Dough


I am usually confused by the cents. four nine ninety-nine? what, ninety-nine? Take it easy, just ninety-nine cents. :smile: